Tis the season to visit Doug Flamm, rare book specialist at Gagosian Gallery

by leslierankowfinearts

Gagosian Gallery and Bookshop, New York, Madison Avenue

WHATEVER YOUR AESTHETIC  INTERESTS OR THOSE OF THE LUCKY PEOPLE YOU ARE GIFTING, DOUG FLAMM, WHO MODESTLY HOLDS COURT AT THE GAGOSIAN SHOP, AT 976 MADISON AVENUE, BETWEEN 76th AND 77th STREET, HAS BOTH AN EXPERT’S KNOWLEDGE OF RARE BOOKS AND ART BOOKS AND AN INTUITIVE SENSE OF EXACTLY WHICH VOLUME WILL FASCINATE AND DELIGHT THE RECIPIENT FOR MANY YEARS TO COME.

THE LRFA BLOG ALWAYS LOOKS FORWARD TO THE HOLIDAY SEASON FOR THE EXCUSE TO VISIT GAGOSIAN BOOKSHOP AND TO VISIT WITH DOUG, PICKING DIFFERENT GIFTS AND, ON OCCASION, PURCHASING AN IRRESISTIBLE ONE TO TAKE HOME.

WE ARE  DELIGHTED TO CELEBRATE OUR HOLIDAY TRADITION AND SHARE DOUG FLAMM’S LATEST PICKS FOR YOU AND YOURS. THE FIRST TWO RECOMMENDATIONS REVISIT THE SIXTIES AND SEVENTIES, AN HOMAGE TO THE NEW YORK ART WORLD BY UGO MULAS IN THE SIXTIES AND TO THE NEW YORK AVANT-GARDE  IN THE SEVENTIES BY GIANFRANCO GORGONI.

Ugo Mulas New York: The New Art Scene

This exhibition of photographs by the Italian Ugo Mulas (1928-1973) was redolent with a double nostalgia. The first was the subject – the New York art world in the 1960s and the artists who made it the culture capital of the known universe. During three visits to New York, Mulas and his camera got inside the studios, dinner parties, and happenings of the likes of Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Barnett Newman, and Andy Warhol, among others. He charted the movement from one generation to the next, from the Abstract Expressionist legacy of “go big or go home,” in a portrait of Newman in front of a vast empty white canvas, to the casual disorder of manufacture in Warhol’s “factory,” with Jackie Os scattered on the floor. The appearance of such figures as choreographer Trisha Brown notwithstanding, Mulas’s New York is a boys’ club, no matter which way they might swing sexually. But looking at these photographs, you almost wanted to have been there.

http://photographmag.com/reviews/ugo-mulas-new-york-the-new-art-scene-at-matthew-marks-gallery/

New York: The New Art Scene is Ugo Mulas’s homage to Manhattan’s art world of the mid-1960s. The book includes photographs of the Pop Art scene as well as of studio visits with Lee Bontecou, John Chamberlain, Jim Dine, Marcel Duchamp, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Barnett Newman, Kenneth Noland, Claes Oldenburg, Larry Poons, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, George Segal, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Tom Wesselmann.

UGL MULAS New York: The New York Art Scene

UGO MULAS

New York:
The New Art Scene

Text by Alan Solomon

Illustrated with approx. 500 photogravure plates by Ugo Mulas

New York: Holt Rinehart Winston, 1967.

RICHARD SERRA The New Avat-Garde, Issues for the Art of the Seventies

RICHARD SERRA

SUSTAINING AN IMPORTANT CAREER FOR NEARLY 5 DECADES, RICHARD SERRA RECENTLY COMMANDED THREE UBER GAGOSIAN GALLERY SPACES IN NEW YORK.HIS WORK WAS FIRST ATTRACTING ATTENTION IN THE SEVENTIES AND SHAPED THE DISCOURSE OF ART IN THE 20th CENTURY.

One of the most famous sculptors of his generation, Richard Serra is also one of the most important artists of the 20th century. Combining the action of Abstract Expressionism with the raw, procedural grind of Process Art, his sculptures recast Minimalism on a monumental scale. Recognizable for their patina—Serra’s favorite material is rolled Cor-Ten steel with an evenly rusted surface—as much as for their size, sculptures like Torqued Ellipses (1996-1997) at the  Dia: Beacon count among the previous century’s most iconic artworks.

https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-how-richard-serra-changed-the-course-of-public-art

THE MINIMALIST SCULPTOR, RICHARD SERRA, WITH CURRENT SHOWS IN THE FALL OF 2019 AT THREE BRANCHES OF THE GAGOSIAN GALLERY, KEEPS THE DYNAMIC OF THE SUBLIME IN SPLENDID TENSION.

The New Yorker, The Art World, October 7, 2019 ISSUE

RICHARD SERRA WILL JOLT YOU AWAKE

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/07/richard-serra-will-jolt-you-awake

GIANFRANCO GORGONI (1941-2019)
The Italian photographer Gianfranco Gorgoni, who was the premiere documenter of major Land art works—including Robert Smithson’s  SpiralJetty, 1970, and Christo and Jeanne-Claude,  Running Fence, 1976—has died at age seventy-seven. Born in Rome, Gorgoni moved to the US in 1968 to produce a photographic essay and stayed after a chance encounter with Robert Rauschenberg.In the 1970s, Gorgoni captured the portraits of artists including Ellsworth Kelly, Claes Oldenburg, Agnes Martin, Andy Warhol, Alfred Leslie,  and others, many of which were included in his book The New Avant-Garde: Issues for the Art of the Seventies (1972) and Beyond the Canvas: Artists of the Seventies and Eighties (1985).Leo Castelli staged four solo shows dedicated to the artist between 1972 and 1996, and his oeuvre was the subject of a solo exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Art in 1978. His work was also included in the Forty-Fifth Venice Biennale (1993) and can be found in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the J. Paul Getty Museum. The Nevada Museum of Art opened  “Gianfranco Gorgoni Land Art Photographs,” an exhibition of his landscape images, in October.
https://www.artforum.com/news/gianfranco-gorgoni-1941-2019-80797

The New Avant-Garde: Issues for the Art of the Seventies

AT GAGOSIAN BOOKSHOP, “NEW AVANT-GARDE, ISSUES FOR THE ART OF THE SEVENTIES”, RESPONDS TO YOUR CURIOSITY ABOUT THIS WILDLY CREATIVE PERIOD OF AMERICAN ART.

THE NEW AVANT-GARDE, ISSUES FOR THE ART OF THE SEVENTIES

Text by Gregorie Muller New York: Praeger, 1972.

New York: The New Art Scene

Documenting the art world of  the 1970s, Gianfranco Gorgoni’s exceptional photographs portray the raw energy that was present during this transformative time in American sculpture. Most notable are the images of Richard Serra throwing molten lead in Leo Castelli’s warehouse.

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SEASON’S GREETINGS!