Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

INTERNATIONAL ART ADVISORY SERVICE

The ultimate gift: artists’ books with Doug Flamm, rare book specialist at Gagosian

Six Contes Fantasques
by Maurice Toesca
Illustrated by Picasso

Artists’ books are works of art, like paintings or sculptures, but in book form. While book illustration has a much longer history, the book as art object is a product of the 20th century. Some of the early examples were created by Futurists and Dadaists in their politically-motivated pamphlets and magazines, by Fluxus artists in their happenings, and by conceptual artists’ in their work to dematerialize the art object. Artists’ books can also be unique creations undertaken with extreme care and attention to detail. Some are experimental and done by artists better known as painters or sculptors, as a way to extend their artistic practice.

Artists’ books exist at the intersections of printmaking, photography, poetry, experimental narrative, visual arts, graphic design, and publishing. They have made a place for themselves in the collections of museums, libraries, and private collectors. They have caught the interest of art historians and critics writing about art, and there are numerous studio programs in art schools dedicated to the art of the book, ushering in new generations of artists making books.

https://library.si.edu/collection/artists-books/introduction

ARTISTS’ BOOKS ARE A FAVORITE ART FORM OF THE LRFA BLOG AND NO ONE IS A MORE FERVENT ADVOCATE AND EXPERT THAN RARE BOOK SPECIALIST DOUG FLAMM AT GAGOSIAN.  HE HAS INTRODUCED US TO SO MANY UNIQUE AND MARVELOUS EXAMPLES.

Picasso
Six Contes Fantasques

TWO OF THE MOST LEGENDARY CONTRIBUTORS TO THE LEGACY OF ARTISTS’ BOOKS ARE PABLO PICASSO AND ED RUSCHA.  IN THE MID-TWENTIETH CENTURY PICASSO FOLLOWED A MORE TRADITIONAL CONCEPT, INCLUDING BEAUTIFUL LITHOGRAPHS WITH A TEXT BY THE FRENCH INTELLECTUAL, MAURICE TOESCA. ED RUSCHA REVOLUTIONIZED ARTIST BOOKMAKING BY ITS DEMOCRATIZATION, PRINTING AND DISTRIBUTION METHODS. RUSCHA CELEBRATES THE BANAL AND  THE ARTIST BOOK FORMAT IS A PERFECT VEHICLE FOR THIS SOURCE OF INSPIRATION.

Picasso
Six Contes Fantasques

AT THE GAGOSIAN SHOP AT 967 MADISON AVENUE, BETWEEN 75th AND 76th STREET, ENRICH THE LIBRARY OF SOMEONE DEAR TO YOU (OR EVEN YOUR OWN!) AND ASK DOUG FLAMM TO SHOW YOU THESE TWO COLLECTOR ITEMS. THE SHOP IS OPEN THIS SUNDAY, CHRISTMAS EVE, FROM 10:00-3:00 FOR LAST MINUTE GIFTS THAT WILL FEEL THOUGHTFUL AND PRE-PLANNED BY THE RECIPIENTS.

http://www.gagosian.com/shop/

 

PABLO PICASSO 

Six Contes Fantastiques

Text by Maurice Toesca

10 1/8 × 13 1/4 inches (25.7 × 33.7 cm)

Published by Flammarion, Paris, 1953

$12,500

———-

This copy is one of 75 copies printed on Montval wove paper, from a total edition of 225 copies. Illustrated with 6 engravings with burin by Picasso. Loose in Japan paper wrappers with chemise and slipcase as issued.

Ed Ruscha
Complete Set of Artist Books

ED RUSCHA

Complete Set of Artist Books

Twentysix Gasoline StationsVarious Small Fires and MilkSome Los Angeles ApartmentsEvery Building on the Sunset StripThirtyfour Parking Lots in Los AngelesRoyal Road TestNine Swimming Pools and Broken GlassCrackersBabycakes with WeightsReal Estate OpportunitiesA Few Palm TreesDutch DetailsRecordsColored People, and Hard Light

Various publishers, 1963–1978

A rare and highly sought-after set of sixteen artists books by Ed Ruscha. All of the books are first editions and many are either signed (seven) or inscribed (four) by Ruscha.

Each book in this set is complete with original glassine when issued and housed in a recently fabricated archival cloth clamshell box with title and date printed on the spine.

Ruscha’s books mark a significant change in bookmaking by artists as the premise is not to enhance or respond to a text. They are antithetical to the history of livre d’artistes—the books do not contain fine prints (etchings, lithographs, etc.) but are simply printed by the more common offset process. Ruscha’s use of banal subject matter further accentuates his departure from the realm of historical book-making processes.

Made mostly in small editions, these captivating books have received a great deal of critical acclaim, especially in recent years as his prominence as a major contemporary artist has increased.

THIS IS A TIME OF YEAR WITH A SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON GIVING AND GRATITUDE. THE LRFA BLOG WANTS TO THANK THE GENEROSITY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS, THEIR THOUGHTFUL INTERVIEWS AND VAST SOURCES OF EXPERTISE AND INFORMATION THAT THEY SHARE. NONE OF THIS WOULD EXIST WITHOUT YOU!

AND, OF COURSE, THANKS TO THE LRFA BLOG FOLLOWERS, WHO MAKE THIS WORTH DOING.

MERRY XMAS TO ALL!

 

 

Capturing the conceptual with Doug Flamm at Gagosian

Chris Burden
1971 – 1973
1974 – 1977

CONCEPTUAL ART IS A MOVEMENT THAT VALUES IDEAS OVER THE FORMAL OR VISUAL ELEMENTS OF AN ART WORK. FROM THE MID-1960s THROUGH THE MID-1970s, CONCEPTUAL ARTISTS PRODUCED WORKS AND WRITING THAT REJECTED THE STANDARD IDEA OF WHAT A WORK OF ART SHOULD BE. CONCEPTUALISM TOOK MYRIAD FORMS, SUCH AS PERFORMANCES AND HAPPENINGS. FOR THE CONCEPTUALIST, A WORK OF ART IS PRIMARILY AN IDEA AND THAT PREMISE PLACES CONCEPTUALIST ART AT THE EXTREME END OF THE TRADITION OF ART MAKING.

TODAY, FOR YOUR MORE CEREBRAL FRIENDS, DOUG FLAMM SUGGESTS TWO WONDERFUL BOOKS ON TWO LEGENDS OF CONCEPTUAL ART.

WELCOME BACK, DOUG!

Chris Burden was the first artist represented by Larry Gagosian, from 1978 until the present day. An artist’s artist, he was a radical and uncompromising figure with a fierce political consciousness. He ceaselessly probed the physical and conceptual limits of art to reflect on the surreal and precarious realities of contemporary life, first in performance, then in large–scale sculptures that are ludic, awe–inspiring, and deeply engaging.

Burden’s early work was ephemeral, overturning preconceptions about the status of a work of art while addressing political, social, environmental and technological change. In shockingly simple, visceral performances, he shook the conventional art world and took the new art form to as–yet unparalleled extremes.

http://www.gagosian.com/artists/chris-burden-2

IN 1974 AND 1978 BURDEN SELF-PUBLISHED TWO BOOKS DOCUMENTING HIS FIRST YEARS OF PERFORMANCE ART. THIS IS AN EXTRAORDINARY RECORD OF AN EPHEMERAL TYPE OF ART BY AN EXTRAORDINARY ARTIST.

CHRIS BURDEN

Chris Burden 71–73 and Chris Burden 74–77

7 1/2 × 10 1/2 inches ( 19 × 26.7 cm ) ; Two volumes; Fully illustrated with detailed captions

Self published by the artist, Los Angeles; 1974 and 1978

$1500

———-

The two volume series, Chris Burden 71–73 and Chris Burden 74–77 covers Burden’s first six years of performance art and is an important part of the documentation of his early works.

Rudolf Stingel
Instructions

MY CLIENTS HAVE POLITELY SUFFERED THROUGH MY EXPLANATION AND OBVIOUS DELIGHT IN TALKING ABOUT RUDOLF STINGEL’S Instructions, A “DIY MANUAL” BY STINGEL THAT DESCRIBE THE TOOLS AND STEPS NECESSARY WHEN MAKING A PAINTING. I HAD NEVER SEEN THE BOOK ITSELF UNTIL NOW BUT LOVED THE CONCEPTUAL IDEA, AN ICONOCLAST’S VIEW OF CREATIVITY.

GAGOSIAN BOOKSTORE HAS THIS UNIQUE WORK AVAILABLE AT THEIR 967 MADISON AVENUE LOCATION, ACROSS FROM THE CARLYLE, ALONG WITH A WEALTH OF OTHER TREASURES FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON AND BEYOND.

http://www.gagosian.com/shop/

RUDOLF STINGEL
Instructions

RUDOLF STINGEL

Rudolf Stingel

Instructions

Stapled printed wrappers preserved in a new cloth clamshell box

6 × 8 1/4 inches (15 × 21 cm); 24 pages; Fully illustrated in black and white; Texts in English, Italian, German, French, Spanish and Japanese

Published by Rudolf Stingel, Milan, 1989

———-

Rudolf Stingel’s Instructions (1989) is a self-published artist’s book that identifies and illustrates the tools and steps needed to make a painting. The publication includes texts in English, Italian, German, Spanish, and Japanese.

Rudolf Stingel
Instructions

 

MORE SUGGESTIONS IN OUR NEXT POST – THANKS SO MUCH FOR FOLLOWING!

Pop Art treasures with Doug Flamm, rare book specialist at Gagosian

Andy Warhol
The Gold Book

IN THE NOVEMBER 2017 ISSUE OF GAGOSIAN MAGAZINE, ANNA HAYWARD DISCUSSED ANDY WARHOL’S GOLD BOOK AND TOUCHES ON THE ARTIST’S EARLY YEARS. “FROM HIS STUDENT DAYS UNTL HIS DEATH, IN 1987, ANDY WARHOL WAS OBSESSED WITH BOOKS. THEIR IMAGE-BEARING CAPACITY, THEIR REPRODUCIBILITY, AND THEIR IMMEDIATE, TACTILE RELATIONSHIPS WITH THEIR READERS WERE ALL EXPLOITED IN THE CHARACTERISTICALLY STYLISH, COMIC, DECORATIVE, IRREVERENT ARTIST’S BOOKS THAT HE DESIGNED AND MADE.”

Warhol_Pages from GG_MagNov2017 Lo-res (1) 2

Andy Warhol
The Gold Book

DOUGLAS FLAMM, GAGOSIAN’S RARE BOOK SPECIALIST, HAS RECENTLY ACQUIRED A SIGNED AND NUMBERED COPY OF A GOLD BOOK. FROM 1957, A HIGHLY SOUGHT-AFTER EDITION OF 100, THE BOOK CONTAINS TWENTY  OFFSET LITHOGRAPHS, FOURTEEN OF THEM PRINTED ON GOLD PAPER, SIX, OF WHICH FOUR IN THIS COPY ARE HAND COLORED IN WATERCOLOR, PRINTED ON WHITE; THIS PARTICULAR EXAMPLE HAS AN ADDITIONAL ILLUSTRATION AFFIXED TO ITS COVER. AT LEAST A HANDFUL OF THE COPIES WERE GIFTS, AS WAS WARHOL’S CUSTOM – HE SENT ONE COPY TO RUSSELL LYNES, AN EDITOR AT Harper’s MAGAZINE AND A WELL-KNOWN PHOTOGRAPHER AND WRITER, AS A CHRISTMAS GIFT THAT YEAR.

WHO WILL BE THIS YEAR’S LUCKY RECIPIENT?

ASK FOR DOUG FLAMM AT GAGOSIAN BOOKSTORE, 976 MADISON AVENUE, ACROSS FROM THE CARLYLE HOTEL, TO HAVE A LOOK IN PERSON.

 

Andy Warhol
The Gold Book

ANDY WARHOL

A Gold Book.

New York, Self Published [1957]

Illustrated with 14 plates printed on gold paper including cover illustration and 6 on white paper, of which 4 with hand-coloring. With original colored interleaving tissues. [40] pp., 37 x 29 cm, bound in original gold paper boards with pastedown illustration.

First Edition. Limited to 100 copies signed by Warhol. Each copy with slight variations of coloring on the white paper prints interleaved with colored tissue.

This book encapsulates early Warhol, a world notably distinct from the canny multimedia and sharply Pop aesthetics that make up his primary legacy. The images – some from photographs, others drawn freehand – show Warholian iconography: shoes, flowers, a self-portrait. The hand painting of each copy varies. This copy has four hand colored plates. A Gold Book is both a nod to pure visual indulgence and a handheld fantasy of the artist’s life.

Andy Warhol
The Gold Book

ANOTHER GREAT POP ARTIST, WHOSE WORK IS COMMANDING INCREASING ATTENTION AT AUCTION, IS TOM WESSELMAN. WHAT BETTER GIFT THAN AN EXTENSIVE MONOGRAPH ON WASSERMANN CONTAINING SECTIONS ON DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF HIS WORK: Bedroom Paintings, Nude Series, Landscape Series, Seascapes, Smoke Series and Still Life Series.

Tom Wesselmann
Text by Slim Stealingworth

12 × 13 1/2 inches (31 × 34 cm)

Published by Abbeville Press, New York, 1980

$450

———-

WESSELMAN
                            Abbeville Press, New York, 1980

 

IN OUR NEXT POST, DOUG HAS MORE WONDERFUL SUGGESTIONS, AND WHEN THE HOLIDAYS ARE OVER, PERHAPS EVEN SOMETHING FOR ONESELF.

IN THE MEANTIME, THE LRFA BLOG THANKS YOU ALL AND WISHES EACH AND EVERYONE A VERY SPECIAL HOLIDAY SEASON!

 

Gagosian opens a bookstore in Paris under the curatorship of Doug Flamm, Gagosian’s rare book expert

Gagosian Bookstore
Rue de Ponthieu, Paris

IN THE WSJ MAGAZINE, NOVEMBER 2, 2017, LARRY GAGOSIAN SPEAKS ABOUT HIS OTHER (THAN ART) PASSION, BOOKS! FOR THREE DECADES, GAGOSIAN GALLERY HAS PUBLISHED HUNDREDS OF BOOKS AND CELEBRATED ITS 500th RELEASE LAST MONTH, STREETLAMPS, ON A SERIES OF WORKS BY CHRIS BURDEN, THE CONCEPTUAL ARTIST. THE GALLERY PUBLISHES BETWEEN 25 AND 40 BOOKS A YEAR,  A NUMBER COMPETITIVE WITH MOST ART PUBLISHING HOUSES. PRINTING IS DONE ALL OVER THE WORLD AND CATALOGS COME IN “A REMARKABLE RANGE OF STYLES, SHAPES AND TEXTURES.”

https://www.wsj.com/articles/larry-gagosians-book-club-1509632872

IN CONJUNCTION WITH GAGOSIAN’S EXHIBITION Picasso and Marie-Therese: L’amour fou”, THE EXHIBITION CATALOGUE CONTAINED AN EXPENSIVE TO PRODUCE SMALL PAPER POCKET WITH A FLIP-BOOK OF PICTURES OF THE YOUNG MARIE-THERESE MAKING FUNNY FACES IN A PHOTO BOOTH. THIS RARE GEM, CONTRIBUTED TO THE EXHIBITION BY DIANA WIDMAIER PICASSO, THE GRANDDAUGHTER OF PICASSO AND MARIE-THERESE AND CURATOR OF THE EXHIBITION, HAD NEVER BEEN SEEN BY THE PUBLIC BEFORE. IT IS THIS KIND OF SPECIAL TOUCH THAT CHARACTERIZES THE GAGOSIAN CATALOGUES, MONOGRAPHS, A QUARTERLY MAGAZINE AND NEWSPAPERS FOR THE ART FAIRS.

IT IS NO SURPRISE THAT GAGOSIAN HAS LAUNCHED A BOOKSTORE IN PARIS DEDICATED SOLELY TO PICASSO AND THAT  THEIR RESIDENT RARE BOOK EXPERT, DOUG FLAMM, WAS ENCOURAGED BY LARRY GAGOSIAN TO LAUNCH THIS NEW VENTURE.

THIS HOLIDAY MONTH, DOUG WILL INTRODUCE SOME UNIQUE AND MARVELOUS BOOKS AVAILABLE AT GAGOSIAN BOOKSHOP IN NEW YORK TO TEMPT THE MOST DISCERNING GIFT GIVER.

GAGOSIAN SHOP   976 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10075

https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=gagosian+shop+new+york+ny+10075&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

 

 

IN THIS POST,  LET’S CONGRATULATE DOUG AND GAGOSIAN GALLERY ON THE OPENING OF A PARIS BRANCH.

THE OPENING EXHIBITION IS  PICASSO: BY THE BOOK

October 19–December 22, 2017

4 rue de Ponthieu 75008 Paris

“Picasso: By the Book” will run concurrently with “Picasso and Maya: Father and Daughter,” in the Paris gallery. Curated by Douglas Flamm, Gagosian’s rare-book specialist, this bookstore will be devoted solely to Picasso. Included will be an in-depth selection of significant Picasso publications, including Christian Zervos’s thirty-three volume catalogue raisonné published by Cahiers d’Art, which remains the closest thing to a comprehensive cataloguing of Picasso’s vast oeuvre for specialists and scholars. Other selections include a complete original set of the periodical Minotaure, published by Editions Skira 1933–39, Jean Cocteau’s Picasso de 1916 à 1961 (a special edition with two extra suites of prints), and Picasso’s 1964 illustrated book, Le Carmen des Carmen, which includes three aquatints, one drypoint etching, and a lithograph.

Rare monographs and noteworthy catalogues such as a 1932 exhibition at Galerie Georges Petite, and Picasso’s last exhibition during his lifetime, in 1973 at the Palais des Papes, Avignon, will be available for sale, alongside contemporaneous art journals in which Picasso published his work, including early issues of Verve, and Cahiers d’Art. The shop will also feature prints and ceramics by Picasso as well as vintage exhibition posters and photographs of the artist by Arnold Newman, Lucien Clergue, and Edward Quinn.

The store will be open within gallery hours, Tuesday–Saturday, 11am–7pm.

IF YOU ARE IN PARIS, BE SURE TO STOP BY 4, RUE DE PONTHIEU IN THE EIGHTH ARRONDISSEMENT  OR, IN NEW YORK, LOOK DOUG UP AT GAGOSIAN BOOKSTORE ON MADISON AVENUE NEXT TO THE UPTOWN GALLERY ENTRANCE AT  976 MADISON AVENUE ACROSS FROM THE CARLYLE HOTEL.

IN OUR NEXT POST WE WILL SEE WHAT DOUG RECOMMENDS TO MAKE YOUR HOLIDAY MERRY AND BRIGHT.

UNTIL THEN!

 

Kate Abrams of Hauser and Wirth: artists, art fairs and exhibitions

Mark Bradford
Moon Rocks, 2017
Art Basel Miami Beach
Miami Beach Convention Center, F18

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH OPENS TODAY AND THE ENTIRE CITY WELCOMES ALL THE COLLECTORS, CURATORS AND VISITORS TO A CITY THAT DEDICATES ITSELF TO A WEEK OF ART AND DESIGN.  THE TOP INTERNATIONAL GALLERIES AND MANY EXCITING CONTEMPORARY ONES  STOCKPILE EXCEPTIONAL WORKS TO PUT THEIR BEST ART FAIR FOOT FORWARD. IT IS A GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO SEE PRIVATE COLLECTIONS, MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS, PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS, AS WELL AS SECONDARY AND PRIMARY MARKET WORKS IN A PACKED FEW DAYS.

Louise Bourgeois
Untitled, 2005
Fabric, thread, stainless steel
F18, Hauser and Wirth

HAUSER AND WIRTH SHINES BRIGHTLY IN THIS HIGHLY COMPETITIVE ARENA, PUBLISHING A SCHOLARLY CATALOGUE OF THE WORKS THEY ARE FEATURING AT MIAMI ART BASEL BY SUCH ICONS AS LOUISE BOURGEOIS, PIERO MANZONI AND BLINKY PALERMO, RASHID JOHNSON, BRUCE NAUMAN AND PAUL McCARTHY.

TODAY, KATE ABRAMS OF HAUSER AND WIRTH SHARES HER KNOWLEDGE OF THE ART OF THE ART FAIR AND THE IMPRESSIVE ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE GALLERY ARTISTS.

THANK YOU KATE!

Bruce Nauman
Untitled (Two Wolves, Two Deer)
F18, Miami Beach Convention Center

DO YOU LOOK AT CONTEMPORARY WORK OF EMERGING ARTISTS NOT NECESSARILY FOR CONSIDERATION BY THE GALLERY?  IF SO, WHAT YOUNGER ARTISTS ARE THE MOST INTERESTING TO YOU, AND WHY?

Yes, I really enjoy looking at the work of emerging artists, and consider it part of my job to be aware of what is happening in all levels of the art world. Many of my close friends are artists so that is a big gateway. I am biased but they are incredibly talented! Isla Hansen is a multimedia artist and is teaching art and technology at Ohio State. Buck Ellison is a photographer based in Los Angeles.

MFA shows are a good indicator as well. Columbia, Yale, Hunter all have great MFA programs.

Also – emerging does not have to mean young! There are a lot of older artists that have gone under the radar for too long. I am so happy to see that Diane Simpson is having a moment right now – I was blown away by her work in a tiny gallery a few years ago, and she recently had a show at ICA Boston. She is 82.

Diana Simpson
ICA Boston
December 2015 – March 2016

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE DIRECTION OF ARTISTS TODAY WHO ARE CONTRIBUTING SIGNIFICANTLY TO THE EVOLUTION OF CONTEMPORARY ART? DO YOU SEE A PATTERN AMONGST THEM THAT STANDS OUT?

I don’t think you can ignore the influence that technology and social media have in contemporary art now, both for better and worse.

I also am very interested to see the conversations that develop out of the recent election and current political climate. Obviously politics in artwork is not new; if anything it’s essential. But it feels particularly significant to me as a movement I am participating in and living through. I’m looking forward to seeing the way that some artists incorporate this moment into their work.   

 

Paul McCarthy
SC Western White River
Art Basel Miami Beach
F18 Hauser and Wirth


AT PRESENT THE ART FAIR COMMANDS A GREAT DEAL OF ATTENTION AS A COMMERCIAL VENUE TO EXPOSE ARTISTS TO THE GREATEST RANGE OF COLLECTORS. DO YOU SEE THAT CHANGING?

Not really. There are definitely a few alternative models developing, and some galleries are choosing not to participate in as many fairs as before – to focus on a select few.  But art fairs have been so successful that galleries now use them as venues to unveil new or newly acquired, top quality work to their audiences. They have become fully engrained in the fabric of the commercial gallery operation, and required viewing for discerning collectors. Of course there are so many now that it’s impossible to have a presence everywhere – galleries need to pick and choose which fairs and audiences are most relevant to them. But I think it’s great the way that certain galleries use the fairs as a way to present conceptual, curated or historical booths, so that the fairs are not just a “marketplace” but also a venue for seeing important presentations.

Mark Bradford
US Pavilion
Venice Biennale

IN TERMS OF THE NEW YORK AND CALIFORNIA VENUES, IS THE DOMINANT CLIENT PROFILE THAT OF AN AMERICAN COLLECTOR? HOW MUCH WORK IS OFFERED “LOCALLY” AND HOW MUCH IS OFFERED INTERNATIONALLY IN ANTICIPATION OF A SOLO EXHIBITION?

Certainly in terms of openings, public programming and events, it’s great to have more presence in the US to connect with our American clients. But in terms of offering work, it’s spread across the board. We consider all of our clients regardless of the location of the exhibition.

Phyllida Barlow Venice Biennale

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE EXHIBITIONS WE CAN ANTICIPATE IN THE 2016-2017 SEASON?

The Los Angeles gallery is still revealing it’s full potential to us. We will open a major survey exhibition devoted to the work of Jason Rhoades, curated by Paul Schimmel and spanning across all of the LA gallery spaces. In the spring, we will open Roni Horn and Dieter Roth on 22nd Street, two cornerstones of our program.

We had a major presence at this year’s Venice Biennale – Mark Bradford represented the US, and Phyllida Barlow represented Britain. 

And lots more projects yet to be announced!

THIS HAS BEEN SUCH A GREAT SERIES OF POSTS. WE ALL JOIN IN THANKING KATE FOR SHARING HER KNOWLEDGE, EXPERTISE AND DEDICATION WITH US.

THIS YEAR HAS FLOWN – ROCK CENTER’S TREE IS UP AND THE SALVATION ARMY VOLUNTEERS GATHER AT EVERY MIDTOWN CORNER IN NEW YORK. DOUG FLAMM, THE RARE BOOK EXPERT AT GAGOSIAN GALLERY WILL CATCH US UP ON A NEW OUTPOST HE HAS OPENED FOR GAGOSIAN IN PARIS DEDICATED TO PICAS AS WELL AS OFFER SOME EXCEPTIONAL GIFTS TO CONSIDER.

PLEASE JOIN US!

 

Artists and the creative process with Kate Abrams at Hauser and Wirth

John Baldessari in his studio

IN A WONDERFUL COLLECTION OF ESSAYS ENTITLED THE POWER OF MYTH, JOSEPH CAMPBELL SPEAKS OF “THE SACRED SPACE”.

To have a sacred place is an absolute necessity for anybody today. You must have a room or a certain hour of the day or so, where you do not know who your friends are, you don’t know what you owe anybody or what they owe you. This is a place where you can simply experience and bring forth what you are and what you might be.”

FOR AN ARTIST, THE SACRED SPACE IS THE STUDIO. IT IS A PLACE OF IDEAS, MATERIALS. CREATIVITY AND REALIZATION. FOR ARTISTS OF THE CALIBER OF THOSE REPRESENTED BY SUCH GALLERIES AS MARIAN GOODMAN AND BARBARA GLADSTONE, THE STUDIO, ITS FORM AND FUNCTION,  PROVIDES A BETTER UNDERSTANDING  BOTH OF THE PROCESS AND OF THE WORK ITSELF.

Lawrence Weiner in his studio

TODAY, KATE ABRAMS, A DIRECTOR AT HAUSER AND WIRTH, RECALLS HER EXPERIENCE AS AN ASSISTANT TO THE GALLERY DIRECTORS AT MARIAN GOODMAN AND HER OPPORTUNITY TO VISIT ARTISTS’ STUDIOS AND BE INVOLVED IN THEIR WORK.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE PRIMARY RECOMMENDATIONS YOU HAVE FOR SOMEONE INTERESTED IN A CAREER IN THE ARTS, SPECIFICALLY IN THE GALLERY WORLD?

See everything! Don’t be afraid to have an opinion. Internships help also.

THE ROSTER OF ARTISTS AT MARIAN GOODMAN GALLERY IS IMPRESSIVE AND INCLUDES OROZO, JULIE MEHRETU, JOHN BALDESSARI, LAWRENCE WEINER AND THE ESTATE OF FRANCESCA WOODMAN. WHICH OF THE ARTISTS’ WORK WAS THE MOST COMPELLING AND WHO CONTRIBUTED THE MOST SIGNIFICANTLY TO YOUR UNDERSTANDING AND APPRECIATION OF GREAT CONTEMPORARY ART?

Marian has an amazing program. It’s hard to understate the importance of John Baldessari or Lawrence Weiner. It was really fun to interact with both of them and their studios, to understand their whole process better. They are both making new work but you also get to interact with these historical pieces which put the new work into context. And then there’s the younger generation of artists, who are making work that will one day be those historical pieces. Julie Mehretu, Danh Vo, or Adrian Villar Rojas for example. It was so exciting to see them all have big moments at the gallery while I was there.

Julie Mehretu
Marian Goodman Gallery exhibition
Liminal Squared 2013

WHICH ARTISTS DID YOU WORK WITH SPECIFICALLY AND WHAT WERE YOUR RESPONSBILITIES? WHAT WERE THE MOST INTERESTING AND CHALLENGING ASPECTS?

I assisted the directors who worked with Julie Mehretu, John Baldessari, Lawrence Weiner, Gabriel Orozco, the Francesco Woodman Estate, and a few others. I was fortunate that both of my bosses gave me a lot of freedom to interact with the artists and their studios, so even though it was an assistant role, I was able to develop those relationships. Seeing an exhibition come to fruition by artists that we worked with was always very rewarding. Also working with the artists on specific projects – for instance publishing a catalogue for the Mehretu show, or helping to organize an Orozco show at MOT Tokyo.

Gabriel Orozco exhibition
Museum of Modern Art

The other large component of my job was sales assistance. We have to sustain the artists’ projects somehow! I definitely developed an interest in it. This was my first foray into sales strategies and client interfacing, so I made sure to pay attention.

DO YOU HAVE ANY CURATORIAL ASPIRATIONS? ARE THERE ARTISTS WHOSE SHOWS YOU WOULD LIKE TO CURATE, AND WHY?

I do, but not in a very formal way. I think those opportunities will come about organically through my relationships with artists and connections that I notice between them. Curating is not my job, so I don’t have the luxury to spend much time trying to conceptualize exhibitions. But when I do see something that I love or connect with, I take note and save it my back pocket of ideas. For now, I really enjoy having a dialogue with the artists that we represent and seeing how those conversations manifest into their work.

Zoe Leonard
In the Wake
Hauser & Wirth exhibition 2016

WHEN DID YOU START AT HAUSER & WIRTH AND WHAT ARE YOUR CURRENT RESPONSBILITIES?

I started in May 2015. Sometimes it feels like I have been there forever and sometimes like I just started! I am an Associate Director; I work closely with one Director and provide support for his sales activities, as well as develop my own. Together we also manage several artists  – Zoe Leonard, Pierre Huyghe, and Richard Jackson are a few.

Pierre Huyghe
Roof Garden
Metropolitan Museum of Art

IN OUR NEXT LRFA POST, KATE WILL BRING US UP TO DATE ON THE HISTORY AND GALLERIES THAT COMPRISE HAUSER AND WIRTH. FOR AN INSIDER’S VIEW, PLEASE JOIN US!

 

First steps in the gallery world with Kate Abrams of Hauser and Wirth

Matthew Barney
River of Fundament

Over five hours long, River of Fundament is a liquid spectacle of words and music, mercury and sulphur, molten iron, blood and feces, polluted industrial rivers in New York and Detroit, a river in Idaho where sockeye salmon go to spawn and die. Rivers of shit run through it. I came out winded, ravished, appalled. “I am asking a lot of the audience, for sure,” Barney tells me.

Based on Norman Mailer’s 1982 novel Ancient Evenings, the film conflates Egyptian myth and modern America, the death and reincarnation of the novelist, cars, sex and creativity. River of Fundament has been presented in opera houses in Munich and Adelaide, and at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.

Barney was a success almost as soon as he left Yale in 1989, being given a solo show at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 1992, and appearing in Documenta 9 and the Whitney Biennial a year later. But it’s true that his art never has been for everyone. A sculptor, performance artist and film-maker, Barney often develops his works over years.

The Guardian, June 16, 2014, excerpt from an interview with Adrian Searle

MATTHEW BARNEY, FILMMAKER EXTRAORDINAIRE IS ONE OF THE MANY INNOVATIVE AND CHALLENGING ARTISTS THAT ARE REPRESENTED BY BARBARA GLADSTONE GALLERY. THE GALLERY HAS REPRESENTED BARNEY AND HELPED TO FINANCE SUCH INTENSE PROJECTS AS “THE CREMASTER CYCLE”, A SERIES OF FIVE FEATURE-LENGTH FILMS TOGETHER WITH RELATED INSTALLATIONS, SCULPTURE, DRAWINGS AND ARTIST’S BOOKS. THAT IS JUST ONE OF MANY CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS AT GLADSTONE THAT INFLUENCE AN ENTIRE GENERATION IN TERMS OF TECHNICAL VIRTUOSITY, SUBJECT MATTER AND CONCEPTUAL IDEAS.

NOT ONLY IS THE GALLERY A MAGNET FOR ARTISTS SUCH AS BARNEY BUT ALSO FOR GALLERISTS SUCH AS KATE ABRAMS, WHO WANTS TO WORK WITH THE BEST, MOST PROVOCATIVE TALENTS IN THE ART WORLD.

TODAY, IN OUR LRFA BLOG, KATE ABRAMS, NOW AN ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AT HAUSER AND WIRTH, SHARES WITH US HER FIRST JOB IN NEW YORK AT GLADSTONE, WHAT IT ENTAILED AND HOW IT PREPARED HER FOR A GREAT CAREER TRACK .

KATE, WELCOME BACK!

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST GALLERY POSITION AND HOW DID WAS THAT EXPERIENCE THE FIRST STEP WITHIN THE GALLERY SYSTEM?

I was a gallery assistant at Gladstone Gallery. Front desk all the way! Barbara is so impressive and has amazing taste. So just being surrounded by that level of talent was a privilege and great learning experience. Matthew Barney, Carroll Dunham, Jim Hodges, Rosemarie Trockel – still some of my favorites today.

Rosemarie Trockel
Barbara Gladstone Gallery

WHAT ARE THE PRIMARY AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY OF THE GALLERY ASSISTANT, ALTHOUGH I AM SURE IT VARIES DEPENDING ON THE SCALE AND SCOPE OF THE GALLERY.

It really depends on the gallery. Everything from managing the checklists to research projects on specific works of art. It’s a lot of support but it’s important to learn how the gallery works from the bottom up. And also familiarize yourself with all the faces and names that walk through the door.

Jim Hodges
Barbara Gladstone Gallery

AS AN ASSISTANT TO THE DIRECTOR, WHAT WERE YOUR FUNCTIONS AND WHAT AREAS OF EXPERTISE DID YOU DEVELOP THE MOST FROM THIS EXPERIENCE?

Being very organized!

Matthew Barney
Barbara Gladstone Gallery

AN ARTIST WHOM I GREATLY ADMIRE AND HAVE FOLLOWED FOR SOME TIME IS MATTHEW BARNEY WHO IS REPRESENTED BY BARBARA GLADSTONE GALLERY. WHAT WAS YOUR INVOLVEMENT IN HIS 2011 EXHIBITION, DJED, AND IN HIS WORK IN GENERAL.

At the time I was assisting the director who worked closely with Matthew. ‘DJED’ was his first show at the NY gallery in 5 years and was a big production. We made a small booklet to accompany the exhibition which I helped to research, edit and produce.

WHAT OTHER ARTISTS DID YOU LIAISE WITH DURING THE TIME AT GLADSTONE? HOW WOULD YOU CHARACTERIZE THEIR WORK, SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES, AND WHAT PROJECTS AND EXHIBITIONS WERE THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR TIME THERE?

‘DJED’ was definitely a favorite show. I also loved a few of our curated shows – ‘The Unfinished Film,’ curated by Thomas Beard, and ‘Requiem for the Sun: The Art of Mono-ha,’ curated by Mika Yoshitake.

http://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-features/interviews/thomas-beard/

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/20/arts/design/requiem-for-the-sun-art-of-mono-ha-at-gladstone-gallery.html

Thomas Hirshhorn
Concordia, Concordia 2012
Barbara Gladstone Gallery

WHAT WERE SOME OF THE EXHIBITIONS THAT WERE THE MOST REWARDING AND WHICH WERE MOST CHALLENGING?

I think the exhibitions that were the most challenging were also the most rewarding. For instance Thomas Hirschhorn’s ‘Concordia, Concordia’ – Thomas turned the 21st Street gallery into the interior of the Costa Concordia, the cruise ship that capsized and sank in Italy in 2012. I found all of these terribly tacky casino-type carpet patterns for Thomas to choose from. We also had to source hundreds of chairs and other things that would make the installation look like the destroyed remains of a cruise ship dining room. We struck gold outside of Atlantic City at a casino-liquidation warehouse. We made a few trips with a truck down there.

YOU HAVE ALWAYS BEEN INVOLVED WITH GALLERIES KNOWN FOR THEIR PHENOMENALLY DEDICATED SUPPORT OF THEIR ARTISTS, SHOWING INSTALLATION, FILM AND VIDEO. YOUR COMMITMENT TO THE ARTS IS CLEARLY REFLECTED IN THE GALLERIES IN WHICH YOU HAVE WORKED.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, KATE WILL CONTINUE TO SHARE HER EXCEPTIONAL PROFESSIONAL HISTORY WITH US.

THE LRFA BLOG WISHES EVERYONE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING. WE SHOULD EXPRESS GRATITUDE EVERYDAY BUT CERTAINLY AT THANKSGIVING. THANKS TO THE EXTRAORDINARY CONTRIBUTORS FOR THEIR THOUGHTFUL AND INFORMATIVE POSTS AND THEIR INSIGHTS INTO THE ART WORLD, ART AND THE MARKET. THANKS TO THE GROWING NUMBER OF SUBSCRIBERS AND FOLLOWERS.  WHEN I STARTED THE BLOG IT WAS JUST FOR THE PURPOSE OF STAYING CURRENT AND REACHING A NEW AUDIENCE. I AM GRATEFUL FOR ALL THAT I LEARN FROM THOSE I INTERVIEW AND FOR THE OVERWHELMING SUPPORT OF THOSE THAT READ IT.

 

Roy Lichtenstein
Still life

Kate Abrams, Director at Hauser & Wirth, documents her early commitment to first-tier art

Katharine Abrams
Associate Director
Hauser & Wirth

HAUSER & WIRTH IS AN INTERNATIONAL GALLERY DEVOTED TO CONTEMPORARY AND MODERN ART FOUNDED IN ZURICH IN 1992 BY IWAN AND MANUELA WIRTH AND URSULA HAUSER. SINCE THAT TIME, THE GALLERY HAS EXPANDED EXPONENTIALLY TO ACCOMMODATE THE INNOVATIVE, RADICAL AND LARGE-SCALED WORKS PRODUCED BY MANY OF THE GALLERY ARTISTS. THE VENUES ARE BROAD IN SCOPE AND EACH SPACE UNIQUE IN FORM AND FUNCTION: AN EXCEPTIONAL SPACE ON LONDON’S SAVILE ROW, THE FORMER DIA FOUNDATION ON 22nd STREET IN NEW YORK’S CHELSEA, A CHIC TOWNHOUSE DESIGNED BY ANNABELLE SELLDORF ON THE UPPER EAST SIDE, A UNIQUE GALLERY AND MULTI-PURPOSE ARTS CENTER IN SOMERSET, ENGLAND, AND MOST RECENTLY, HAUSER & WIRTH OPENED A PHENOMENAL SPACE IN THE BURGEONING DOWNTOWN ARTS DISTRICT OF LOS ANGELES.

The Peggy Guggenheim Museum
Venice, Italy

TODAY, THE GALLERY IS A GLOBAL ENTERPRISE THAT HAS A TRADITIONAL VALUE SYSTEM OF SUPPORTING ITS ARTISTS AND ARTIST ESTATES  BY PROVIDING REMARKABLE EXHIBITION SPACES AND THE SCHOLARSHIP, CATALOGUES, PUBLIC PROGRAMS AND EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES THAT SERVE TO CONTEXTUALIZE THE ART ON VIEW.

IT IS PLEASURE TO INTRODUCE MY FRIEND AND COLLEAGUE, KATHARINE ABRAMS, DIRECTOR AT HAUSER & WIRTH, TO THE LRFA BLOG. KATE’S PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE INCLUDES POSITIONS AT TWO HIGHLY RESPECTED GALLERIES, BARBARA GLADSTONE AND MARIAN GOODMAN, AND HER CAREER PATH HAS BEEN FOCUSED AND DIRECT.

The Saatchi Gallery
Iconoclasts: Art Out of the Mainstream

KATE, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR TAKING THE TIME TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE LRFA BLOG!

WHERE IS HOME? DID YOU GROW UP IN NEW YORK OR COME TO THE CITY TO ATTEND SCHOOL?

New York is home now, but I grew up in Los Angeles. I came to New York in 2006 to attend Columbia University. And then I stayed.

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST INTRODUCTION TO MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART AND HOW DID IT LEAD YOU TO PURSUING A GALLERY CAREER?

My parents have always been interested in art and I grew up going to museums. But I think the first time it really resonated with me was when I was 13 and we went to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice. I was totally transfixed. I also vividly remember visiting the Saatchi Gallery and the Tate in London when I was 16. Venice piqued my interest and then London solidified it.

The gallery career came about organically after college. I needed a job and I happened to get one at a gallery. At that time I was also open to non-profits and institutions as well. But I’m glad it happened the way it did.

Judd Foundation
Spring Street, New York

WHAT ARTISTS FIRST CAUGHT YOUR ATTENTION AND WHY?

I was always very interested in Minimalism, both aesthetically and intellectually. Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, Carl Andre, Robert Morris – the greats. I was lucky to study closely with Branden Joseph, who came to Columbia the same year I did. First I took a lecture course on Minimalism and Post-Minimalism, and the following year I took a travel seminar where we went to Houston to see the Menil Collection and then to Marfa to see the Judd Foundation and Chinati. That trip was really important to me. I came back and immediately got an internship at the Judd Foundation on Spring Street.  

The Donald Judd Foundation
Chinati
Marfa, Texas

YOU MAJORED IN ART HISTORY AT COLUMBIA AND WROTE YOUR SENIOR THESIS ON ONE OF MY ABSOLUTE FAVORITE ARTISTS, JAMES TURRELL. WHTAT PROMPTED THAT CHOICE AND WHAT ARE THE ELEMENTS IN HIS WORK THAT RESONATE THE MOST STRONGLY?

After I got back from Marfa, I couldn’t stop thinking about the quality of the light there. The way the light interacts with Judd’s sculptures at Chinati – he purchased all the land surrounding the installation so that nothing would interrupt that. I started to be interested in the phenomenology of perception and light as a medium. A lot of people are familiar with Turrell’s projection pieces and skyspaces, but not as much about his earliest work in his studio in Venice, CA. He created a 10-hour performative piece called the ‘Mendota Stoppages’ using small apertures in the windows directed towards natural or artificial lights outside. The viewer would gradually adjust to the changing qualities of light in the space over time.

James Turrell
Mendota Stoppages

 

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, KATE ABRAMS WILL SHARE HER EARLY PROFESSIONAL PATH, FROM ONE GREAT GALLERY TO THE NEXT. WE ARE FORTUNATE TO HAVE SUCH A DEDICATED ART LOVER AND GALLERIST WITH US. PLEASE FEEL FREE TO ASK ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE.

 

The future of the American art market with Questroyal’s Chloe Heins

Main Gallery
Questroyal Fine Art

IN THEIR NEW BOOK, ALTERED TRAITS, PSYCHOLOGISTS DANIEL GOLEMAN  AND RICHARD DAVIDSON UNVEIL NEW RESEARCH IN THE FIELD OF NEUROSCIENCE TO SHOW WHAT MEDITATION AND MINDFULNESS DOES TO ACTUALLY CHANGE YOUR MIND, BRAIN AND BODY. MEDITATION INCLUDES A WIDE RANGE OF PRACTICES AND DIFFERING TYPES THAT PRODUCE UNIQUE RESULTS BUT A MIND UNDISTURBED IS A SIGNIFICANT GOAL IN ALL THE GREAT SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS. IN 1843, JOHN RUSKIN, THE ENGLISH ART CRITIC, PUBLISHED HIS FIRST VOLUME OF HIS MODERN PAINTERS , INSTRUCTING ARTISTS TO BE TRUTHFUL TO NATURE’S FORMS AS TRUTH IN APPEARANCE WOULD LEAD TO HIGHER MORAL AND SPIRITUAL TRUTHS. OUR HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL EMBRACED THIS AND DEDICATED THEIR WORK TO THE ACCURATE DEPICTION OF NATURE. STUDYING AND APPRECIATING WORKS THAT DEPICT THE SPLENDOR OF NATURE AND THE POWER OF GOD’S HAND AT WORK CAN INSPIRE THE SAME UNDISTURBED MIND.  THIS SCHOOL OF PAINTING MAKES UP THE HEART OF QUESTROYAL FINE ART’S INVENTORY.

George Lambdin
Floral Still Life
Oil on canvas

TODAY, CHLOE HEINS, THE GALLERY DIRECTOR, WILL SPEAK ABOUT ADVISING NEW COLLECTORS, THE FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN MARKET AND PLANS FOR THE FORTHCOMING SEASON.

https://www.questroyalfineart.com/

AS A YOUNG  COLLECTOR BEGINNING TO ACQUIRE WORKS OF ART, WHAT ARE THE GUIDELINES TO CONSIDER AND YOUR RECOMMENDATIONS TO STEER THEM IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION?

We advise collectors to buy the best painting they can afford. Rather than going for a subpar example by the biggest name or the highest volume of works within their budget, we advise them to begin with what they love. Then they can confirm that they are receiving a fair price and that it is a solid representation of the artist. There are many artists that are undervalued and never receive  the recognition they deserved and this can be a great opportunity for new collectors. Above all, buy what you love. This will never betray you.

Edward Moran
Lobster Fishing, Long Island
Oil on canvas

IN A TIME WHEN A FEW CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS SUCH AS BASQUIAT AND JEFF KOONS AND CONTEMPORARY MASTERS SUCH AS SIGMAR POLKE AND GERHARD RICHTER ARE COMMANDING RECORD AUCTION PRICES, HOW DO YOU INTEREST AND DIRECT A NASCENT COLLECTOR TO THE AMERICAN MARKET?

It is easy to get discouraged by the prices in the post-war and contemporary market and the rampant celebrity of the key artists, collectors, and dealers. This is why I like to discuss American art within the context of the better-known areas of the art market. Once collectors see the inexplicable discrepancy in value and realize they could buy the entire Questoyal inventory for the price of one Lucien Freud painting, they begin to take notice! We have broken down boundaries by advertising in non-art-specific publications which attract a different type of client. Bringing new collectors into the American art market is essential.

Charles Burchfield
Woodland Scene

WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN MARKET?

While it can be unpredictable, the American paintings market does not trend towards a bubble. It’s relatively steady compared to other genres of art. The new interest in American art that we are seeing indicates a bright future. Just this year, several of our colleagues have also met new clients who have become very active at a high level. However, American art dealers have to be comfortable and confident in the shadow of the post-war and contemporary market and many dealers have given up.

I am cautiously optimistic that the American art market will continue to grow, and hopefully our colleagues in the gallery and auction sectors will remain dedicated. We certainly are!

Questroyal Fine Art
Be Uncool
Published November 2017

WHAT EXHIBITIONS AND PUBLICATIONS CAN WE LOOK FORWARD TO IN THE 2017-2018 SEASON?

Our annual hardcover Important American Paintings catalogue became available in early October. Volume XVIII: Be Uncool is an exciting addition to the series and features 37 collection highlights. The concept stems from our ongoing advertising campaign urging collectors to “be uncool” and seek what is timeless, not trendy.

“Be uncool” has become an effective headline for us, capturing the attention of many readers of the New York Times Magazine, the New Yorker, and Architectural Digest. But it is more than just a promotion; it is a philosophy and a call to action…Will you accept my challenge to be uncool? Will you follow the preference of your heart and question the opinion of others ? Are you willing to sacrifice the fleeting rewards of all that is timely for the transcendent satisfaction of pursuing what is truly timeless ? 

Excerpt from the foreword by Louis Salerno, Volume XVIII, “It is Wise to be Uncool”.

CHLOE, THANK YOU SO MUCH. YOUR LOVE OF AMERICAN ART AND ITS IMPORTANCE RESOUNDS IN EVERY WORD.

PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE NEXT POST TO WELCOME KATE ABRAMS, AN ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AT HAUSER & WIRTH, ONE OF OUR MOST RESPECTED AND IMPORTANT INTERNATIONAL MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY GALLERIES. WITH LOCATIONS IN NEW YORK (2), LONDON, LOS ANGELES, ZURICH, STAAD AND SOMERSET, ENGLAND, WE HAVE PLENTY OF TERRITORY TO COVER. WE COULDN’T HOPE FOR A BETTER GUIDE THAN KATE.

 

American Art, from Blakelock to Porter, at Questroyal Fine Art, with director Chloe Heins

Questroyal Fine Art

IN A GALLERY PUBLICATION OF QUESTROYAL’S  Important American Paintings SERIES, CHLOE HEINS EXPRESSES HER DEEP COMMITMENT TO AMERICAN ART AND TO NURTURING AN INTEREST IN ITS BEAUTY AND VALUE FOR EXISTING AND NEW COLLECTORS.

IN HER OWN WORDS….

At Questroyal we spend a lot of time trying to determine what motivates people to buy art, specifically American paintings. It is probably for the best that we can’t solve this mystery, otherwise our role as art dealers would become formulaic. Yet, we still attempt to get to the heart of the matter—to understand the habitual and complex relationship between collectors and paintings.

What makes certain paintings resonate so deeply? When looking at art, what we see is ultimately a blend of the artist’s vision merged with our own perception. In a metaphoric visualization, I picture looking into a mirror and seeing the artist’s face, which then gradually begins to resemble my own reflection. The American painters I am most drawn to lived and worked using unique methods of self-discovery, reflection, and observation. Evidence of their process and perspective permeates their artwork. In the gallery, there are paintings I will hardly notice for months and others I immediately find magnetic. We all share this experience to varying degrees. But what is it about those paintings that we can’t forget?

Important American Paintings, Volume 16, Foreword

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO CONTINUE ITS CONVERSATION WITH THE GALLERY’S DIRECTOR, CHLOE HEINS.

HOW WAS QUESTROYAL ORIGINALLY FORMED, WHEN DID IT OPEN? HAS IT ALWAYS BEEN IN THE  SAME LOCATION AND HOW HAS IT EVOLVED OVER THE YEARS?

Questroyal was established by owner Lou Salerno in the late 1980s. Lou initially had a small gallery on E.80th Street before coming to 903 Park Avenue, our current location. In its first iteration at this address, Questroyal occupied two units on the 3rd floor. Over the years, the gallery expanded and now spans the whole floor.

https://www.questroyalfineart.com/

Exhibition
Questroyal Fine Art

Lou’s oldest son Brent, Questoyal’s co-owner, has been involved with the gallery since its early years. The Salernos share a passion for American art and a client-forward approach. Our inventory has also grown in size and diversity. Hudson River School paintings have always been the foundation of Questroyal’s inventory, however, over time we began to selectively purchase American Impressionism and Modernism which has become an essential part of our collection. Furthering this, over the past decade, we have pushed our twentieth-century inventory to new heights with important modern acquisitions, like Fairfield Porter’s masterpiece, Sun Rising Out of the Mist, 1973. The gallery has organized many important exhibits.

Fairfield Porter
Sun Rising Out of the Mist
1973

DO YOU ACT IN A CURATORIAL CAPACITY OR IS IT A COLLECTIVE PROCESS? WHAT ARE SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS OF GALLERY EXHIBITIONS?

Our Ralph Albert Blakelock exhibition last November was a career highlight for Lou, Brent, and me. We were thrilled with its success and continue to be amazed by Blakelock’s influence and impact. We are now gearing up for our Henry Martin Gasser exhibition this November. We have found that Gasser appeals to many types of collectors though he is far lesser-known than some of his contemporaries. Over the past few years, we have seen a considerable rise in his popularity and are excited to exhibit over 40 works in the show. His unique illustrational style is unparalleled—it is a modern, yet relatable aesthetic. The gallery has organized many important exhibits.

Ralph Albert Blakelock
Evening Slhouettes
Oil on canvas

https://www.questroyalfineart.com/artist/ralph-albert-blakelock/

THE GALLERY PUBLISHES COMPREHENSIVE AND SCHOLARLY PUBLICATIONS AND YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS ARE SO GENUINE AND WELL-WRITTEN. WHAT ARE SOME ESSAYS THAT CONTRIBUTE THE MOST TO OUR UNDERSTANDING AND APPRECIATION OF AMERICAN ART?

Thank you! Each year, I contribute the forward to our fall catalogue. I task myself with choosing a theme that is both relevant to the present day and the legacy of our nineteenth- and- twentieth-century American paintings. My goal is to help collectors see this “historic” art in current terms and to address the extreme valuation discrepancies in the art world. I like to give American art a context within the sea of other art and the constant chatter about the contemporary art market.

Our Important American Paintings catalogue series includes inspiring and relevant information on the many artists in our inventory as well as insightful comments from Lou who has an irrefutable instinct for this business.  

Vol17-Enduring-2016

Henry Martin Gasser’s private opening reception on November 9th benefits Caring Kind.

IN OUR NEXT POST, CHLOE WILL PROVIDE HER INFORMED OPINION ABOUT THE FUTURE OF AMERICAN ART.

THANK YOU FOR FOLLOWING THE LRFA BLOG, PLEASE CONTINUE TO DO SO!