Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

INTERNATIONAL ART ADVISORY SERVICE

Tag: exhibitions

Holding one’s breath while allowing artists complete creative license with Meg Malloy, partner, Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

Zipora Fried As the Ground Turns Solid Current exhibit Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

 

BOASTING A DIVERSE ROSTER OF NOTEWORTHY ARTISTS WORKING TODAY, SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO. IS AN ESTABLISHED MIDSIZE GALLERY SPACE LOCATED IN WEST CHELSEA. REPRESENTED ARE SUCH BIG-NAME VETERANS AS VIK MUNIZ AND KARA WALKER, AS WELL AS MID-CAREER POWERHOUSES SHEILA HICKS AND DEANA LAWSON. THE WORK REPRESENTS ARTISTS WHO WORK IN EVERY MEDIUM: PAINTING, PHOTOGRAPHY, SCULPTURE, VIDEO, INSTALLATION; AND IN EVERY GENRE: ABSTRACTION, NARRATION, FIGURATION, MANY ADDRESSING SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ISSUES, OTHERS ADDRESSING THE LEGACY OF ART HISTORY AND EVOLVING IT FORWARD.  THE UNIFYING FACTOR IS THE QUALITY, ENGAGEMENT AND IMPACT OF THE WORK, TO THE VIEWER, TO THE COLLECTOR AND TO THE MUSEUM CURATOR.

IN 2019 ALONE, SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO.  EXHIBITED THE WORK OF THE FOLLOWING ARTISTS, AN ABBREVIATED EXAMPLE OF THE BREADTH AND SCOPE OF THE ARTISTS THE GALLERY SUPPORTS AND ENCOURAGES.

Brenda Goodman

BRENDA GOODMAN

With over 50 years of experience as a painter, Goodman is an artist at the height of her career. She began in 1960s Detroit, as a member of the famed Cass Corridor Movement. In the early 1970s, she exhibited with Guston, Tworkov and de Kooning at the Gertrude Kasle Gallery. After moving to New York City in 1976, Goodman explored ways to integrate intensely personal issues with the freedom of abstract expressionism.

Louis Fratino

LOUIS FRATINO

Drawing inspiration from personal experience and, more recently, photographic source material, Fratino makes paintings and drawings of the male body. His work includes portraits, nudes, and intimate scenes of male couples engaged in activities ranging from the mundane to the graphically sexual. The result is a body of work that is a loving and honest expression of the contemporary gay experience.

Jennifer Packer

JENNIFER PACKER

Packer’s painted figures and still lifes are exceptional for their expressive fields of color, worked tenderly by the artist’s hand. They are images made with the utmost care–for the subject, and for the artist herself. Packer’s subjects are often friends and family, loved ones who serve as an emotive force in her life. Her representations critique the positionality, autonomy and power of the marginalized subject.

Terry Haggerty

TERRY HAGGERTY

Terry Haggerty’s paintings reveal the multi-dimensional possibilities within painting – bold color is used to enliven and give volume and depth to positive and negative space. A series of monochrome lines, corners, and edges fold around one another, activating gaps between geometric planes of color. Haggerty’s works embrace the tension between two-dimensional outline and three-dimensional form, creating images characterized as “half object, half painting.”

AND CURRENTLY, THE BEAUTIFUL RECENT ABSTRACTIONS BY

Zipora Fried

ZIPORA FRIED

Working across sculpture, photography, and drawing, Fried’s oeuvre explores the potential of color and form to transcend language and express the nuances of the human experience. The subconscious remains a focal point of interest for Fried, as the formal conditions of object and image become deconstructed and reinterpreted through their symbolic connections to one another. Every gesture of the artist’s hand, in shape and form, signifies a distinct moment in the phenomenological experience of Fried’s work.

MEG, WHAT ARTISTS DOES THE GALLERY REPRESENT, AND HOW WOULD YOU CHARACTERIZE THE WORK?

The artists that  we represent are quite varied, and it is hard to pinpoint, but I feel that all  start from social or conceptual concerns, and all have great skill and create work that is consistently engaging on both a visual and an intellectual level.

IS THERE A PARTICULARLY AESTHETIC, OR CONCEPTUAL OR ABSTRACT POINT OF VIEW THAT CONNECTS EACH ARTIST’S WORKS?

I would say it is open-ended, but each of our artists has an integrity and an unshakable commitment to what they do. 

WHAT DID YOU MOVE TO CHELSEA, AND WHAT PROMPTED THAT DECISION?

The gallery moved to Chelsea because there were great spaces, and Soho rents were through the roof.

WAS THE CURRENT 22nd STREET LOCATION THE FIRST SPACE THAT YOU TOOK, AND HOW HAS IT EXPANDED OVER THE YEARS?

We are at the same address, but the gallery has been in the unusual position of  being able to expand in place as the business grew.   We had half of our downstairs originally and then were offered the other half.   This was due to unfortunate circumstances as both Pat Hearn and Colin de Land who had that space passed away.  Then we rented the back of upstairs from Anina Nosei for storage and viewings, and then when she didn’t renew we took over  that space. 

Sheila Hicks

 

THE GALLERY ROSTER IS A STRONG MIX OF ESTABLISHED ARTISTS SUCH AS ARTURO HERRERA, SHEILA HICKS, KARA WALKER, AND EMERGING TALENTS. WHO ARE SOME OF THE ARTISTS AND WHAT ARE SOME OF THE EXHIBITIONS THAT HAVE RESONATED WITH YOU THE MOST?

That is an impossible question!  😊

YOU SHOW ARTISTS IN A WIDE VARIETY OF MEDIA. WHO ARE SOME OF THE ARTISTS THAT YOU REPRESENT THAT ARE THE MOST CHALLENGING IN TERMS OF THE EXHIBITION OF THEIR WORK? YOU ARE SO GENEROUS WITH THE GALLERY SPACE, ALLOWING THE ARTISTS LICENSE TO TREAT THE SPACE AS PART OF THE CREATIVE PROCESS.

You have to have faith in an artist’s  vision.   That said, there are times when we hold our breath. For Kara’s last show, there were three very large-scale unframed works on paper.  The audience for that show was enormous and we worried that the work could be damaged but people were so respectful.  William Córdova created a scaffolding that pushed viewers to the perimeter of the gallery. 

William Cordova
Machu Picchu

MORE ABOUT THE GALLERY, ART FAIRS, CURRENT AND FUTURE EXHIBITIONS WITH MEG MALLOY IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG.

IN THE MEANTIME, EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY, AND HAVE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!

Andy Warhol
Turkey Noodle Soup

A history of rich, scholarly and history-making exhibitions at Cheim and Read with Director Maria Bueno

Al Held
Black & White Paintings
Cheim & Read

CURATING AN EXHIBITION IS AN ART FORM IN AND OF ITSELF. THE CONCERNS ARE BOTH AESTHETIC AND PRACTICAL. A CURATOR HAS AN IDEA FOR AN EXHIBITION AND THEN STARTS TO EXPLORE THE ARTWORKS THAT WOULD BE THE FIRST CHOICES TO BEST ILLUSTRATE THE THEME. FROM A PRACTICAL POINT OF VIEW, IT IS LABOR-INTENSIVE IN TERMS OF CONVINCING THE LENDERS, BORROWING THE WORKS, EXECUTING THE LOAN AGREEMENTS, CHECKING THE CONDITION OF THE WORKS, TRANSPORTING THEM, THE INSURANCE, AND SO ON. FROM AN AESTHETIC PERSPECTIVE, THERE ARE WORKS THAT ARE ESSENTIAL CENTERPIECES OF THE EXHIBITION AND CURATORS MUST PLAN, A LONG TIME IN ADVANCE, TO ACQUIRE THEM FOR EXHIBITION.

Serpentine Pavilion

ONE OF THE MOST BRILLIANT MUSEUM CURATORS IS SUPERSTAR HANS ULRICH OBRIST, CURATOR OF THE UNIQUE SERPENTINE GALLERY IN LONDON,  WHO CONTRIBUTED THIS ARTICLE ON THE ART OF CURATION TO THE GUARDIAN IN MARCH 2014.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/mar/23/hans-ulrich-obrist-art-curator

IT’S WORTH THINKING ABOUT THE ETYMOLOGY OF CURATING. IT COMES FROM THE LATIN WORD CURARE, MEANING TO TAKE CARE. IN ROMAN TIMES, IT MEANT TO TAKE CARE OF THE BATH HOUSES. IN MEDIEVAL TIMES, IT DESIGNATED THE PRIEST WHO CARED FOR SOULS. LATER, IN THE 18TH CENTURY, IT MEANT LOOKING AFTER COLLECTIONS OF ART AND ARTIFACTS.

THERE’S A HANGOVER OF ALL THOSE THINGS IN MODERN CURATING. WHEN I CURATED MY FIRST EXHIBITION – WHICH FOLLOWED DISCUSSIONS WITH THE ARTISTS PETER FISCHLI AND DAVID WEISS,  RICHARD WENTWORTH, CHRISTIAN BOLTANSKI AND HANS PETER FELDMANN,  IN THE KITCHEN OF MY APARTMENT IN ST. GALLEN, SWITZERLAND – I HAD A PRODUCTIVE MISUNDERSTANDING WITH MY PARENTS. THEY THOUGHT I WAS GOING INTO MEDICINE BECAUSE CURATING MEANS CARING. I DON’T THINK THEY THOUGHT IT WAS TO DO WITH ART.

TODAY, CURATING AS A PROFESSION MEANS AT LEAST FOUR THINGS. IT MEANS TO PRESERVE, IN THE SENSE OF SAFEGUARDING THE HERITAGE OF ART. IT MEANS TO BE THE SELECTOR OF NEW WORK. IT MEANS TO CONNECT TO ART HISTORY. AND IT MEANS DISPLAYING OR ARRANGING THE WORK. BUT IT’S MORE THAN THAT. BEFORE 1800, FEW PEOPLE WENT TO EXHIBITIONS. NOW HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF PEOPLE VISIT THEM EVERY YEAR. IT’S A MASS MEDIUM AND A RITUAL. 

IN THE GALLERY WORLD, CHEIM & READ IS KNOWN FOR ITS EXCEPTIONAL GALLERY EXHIBITIONS.

https://www.cheimread.com/

IN TODAY’S LRFA BLOG, GALLERY DIRECTOR MARIA BUENO, WILL SHARE A VERY SMALL SLICE OF THE GALLERY’S VERY RICH AND EXTENSIVE EXHIBITION HISTORY.

MARIA, WELCOME BACK!

Jack Pierson
Installation View
Cheim & Read

 

MANY OF THE ARTISTS THE GALLERY REPRESENTS HAVE BEEN WITH THE GALLERY SINCE ITS INAUGURATION IN 1997.  WHO ARE SOME OF THE ARTISTS THAT FALL IN THAT CATEGORY?

Lynda Benglis, Louise Bourgeois, Adam Fuss, Bill Jensen, Jonathan Lasker, Jack Pierson, and Juan Usle.

Lynda Benglis
Installation View
Cheim & Read

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING AN ARTIST’S REPRESENTATION? ARE THEIR SPECIFIC STEPS, AS IN TESTING THE WATERS WITH GROUP EXPOSURE, OR DOES IT DIFFER IN EACH INSTANCE?

It differs in each instance, but the most important component of considering representing an artist is that the artist’s work fits within John Cheim’s curatorial vision and also complements the artists whom we already work with – context is extremely important to us and it is important all of our artists’ work can have a meaningful dialogue when shown together. 

Jean-Michel Basquiat In Word Only Cheim & Read

WITH A TWENTY YEAR HISTORY, THIS BECOMES AN IMPOSSIBLE QUESTION BUT WHAT WOULD YOU CONSIDER SOME OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING SOLO EXHIBITIONS?

Impossible question, indeed! Some that come to mind are IN WORD ONLY by Jean Michel Basquiat, Joan Mitchell FRÉMICOURT PAINTINGS, Louise Bourgeois SUSPENSION, and Al Held’s BLACK AND WHITE PAINTINGS.

N.B. To coincide with two major retrospective exhibitions of Basquiat’s work at the Brooklyn Museum, New York and the Museo d’Arte Moderna, in Lugano, Switzerland, in 2005, Cheim & Read presented an exceptional exhibit entitled “In Word Only” that focused on the paintings, drawings and notebooks that celebrated the use of the written word and its significance.  This exhibition was the first to exclusively feature Basquiat’s unique and significant use of language.

The Female Gaze: Women Look At Women
Cheim & Read, 2009

WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER SOME OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING GROUP EXHIBITIONS?

The Female Gaze: Women Look At Women and its counterpart , The Female Gaze: Women Look at Men, Soutine and Modern Art: The New Landscape, The New Still Life and I Am As You Will Be: The Skeleton In Art.

N.B. THESE ARE JUST A VERY FEW EXAMPLES OF THE SCHOLARSHIP AND INTELLECTUAL RIGOR THAT CHEIM & READ HAS INVESTED IN A TWENTY YEAR PERIOD WHEN CURATING WORKS FOR AN EXHIBITION. THE EXHIBITS ARE ACCOMPANIED BY BEAUTIFULLY CONCEIVED CATALOGUES THAT INCLUDE AN ESSAY ON THE EXHIBITION AND IMAGES OF THE WORKS.

The Female Gaze: Women Look At Women
Cheim & Read 2009

THE FEMALE GAZE: WOMEN LOOK AT MEN

A prescient two part exhibition on the female form as seen through the eyes of women artists and men artists took place in September 2009 at Cheim and Read.

With
 this
 premise, 
the 
show  
sought
 to
 present
 a
 collection 
of 
works
 which
 reclaim
ed the
 traditional
 domination
 of
 the
 “male
 gaze”
 and
 reorient
ed the
 significance 
of
 the 
female
 figure 
to
 allow 
for
 more
 varied
 interpretations. A variety of mediums was included- sculpture, photography, video, painting and installation- and a rich and diverse group of women artists represented including Vanessa Beecroft, Lynda Benglis, Ellen Gallagher, Nan Golden, Roni Horn, and Joan Mitchell, to name a few. 

Wendy
Steiner, 
in 
her
 essay
 “Venus 
in 
Exile:
The
Rejection 
of
 Beauty in
Twentieth-Century
 Art”
 elaborates 
further:

The 
‘self’
 judging
 the 
beauty
 of 
art,
 for 
example,
 is 
a
 perceiver
 and
 hence 
a 
conscious
 subject,
 whereas 
the
‘ Other’ 
is
 merely
 the 
object
 of 
this 
perception. 
If
 the 
Other 
is 
an
artwork, 
it
 is 
inanimate
 by 
definition;
 many 
people 
would
 argue 
that 
the
 perception
 of
 a
 woman 
(or 
man 
or
 child)
 as
 beautiful
 reduces
 her 
to 
the 
status 
of 
a
 thing 
as
 well.
Indeed,
 in 
the
 perennial
 symbolism
 surrounding
 beauty,
 the 
perceiver 
(the
 self)
 is
 active 
and
 ‘hence’
 male,
 and 
the 
artwork
 or
 woman 
(the
Other)
 is
 passive
 ( to-be-seen )
 and 
‘therefore’ 
female.

This
 exhibition 
attempts 
to 
debunk
 the
 notion
 of 
the
 male 
gaze 
by
 providing 
a
 group
 of
 works 
in 
which 
the
 artist 
and
 subject
 do
 not
 relate
  as
“voyeur”
and
“object,”
 but
 as
woman
 and 
woman.
 It
 would 
be 
interesting 
to
 ask 
the 
question
 how
 we
 would 
feel
 about
  the 
works 
in
 the
 exhibition 
if
 we
 were
 told
  they 
were
 made
 by 
a
 man.

Soutine and Modern Art: The New Landscape, The New Still Life
Cheim & Read

DO YOU INVITE GUEST CURATORS OR DOES THE THEMATIC IDEA FOR AN EXHIBIT REST WITH HOWARD AND/OR JOHN OR WITH THE GALLERY STAFF AS A GROUP?

The majority of our exhibitions are conceived and curated by John Cheim but on occasion we do invite artists like Jack Pierson to curate exhibitions. We have also had independent curators like Raphael Rubinstein curate exhibitions such REINVENTING ABSTRACTION which focused on New York abstraction in the 1980s as practiced by a generation of painters born between 1939 and 1949.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, MARIA GIVES HER ASTUTE PERSPECTIVE ON THE PLACE OF ART FAIRS IN THE CURRENT MARKET.

UNTIL THEN!

The art of relationships: art fairs, appraisal services, museum curators at Debra Force Fine Art

Debra Force
Art League Presents
Kalamazoo Institute of Arts

DEVELOPING A DIALOGUE WITH MUSEUM CURATORS AND MUSEUM BOARDS AND PLACING WORKS IN INSTITUTIONAL VENUES IS ONE OF THE GREAT ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF ONLY A HANDFUL OF GALLERIES.  IT REPRESENTS AN INVESTMENT OF TIME AND SCHOLARSHIP AS WELL AS ONE OF NURTURING RELATIONSHIPS. SEVERAL CONTEMPORARY GALLERIES HAVE DIRECTORS WHO FOCUS SOLELY ON CULTIVATING MUSEUM RELATIONSHIPS FOR THEIR ARTISTS, TRAVELING ACROSS THE COUNTRY TO NEGOTIATE EXHIBITIONS AND MEETING WITH BOARDS OF MUSEUMS AND CURATORS TO PRESENT WORKS BY ARTISTS THEY REPRESENT. IT IS AN ART FORM IN AND OF ITSELF.

AS THE CHICAGO APPRAISERS ASSOCIATION NOTES:

The trick to selling to museums whether it be a large institution like the Metropolitan Museum of Art or your local historical society is scholarly research, provenance and a lot of patience. Nothing moves fast with museums. They do not have to necessarily operate on at a yearly profit, so they move at their own maddening slow pace.

IT IS A MARK OF THE QUALITY OF THE WORK AND THE EXPERTISE OF THE DEALER THAT DEBRA FORCE HAS SUCH GREAT SUCCESS IN PLACING ART WORKS IN VERY PRESTIGIOUS MUSEUMS.

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG CONTINUES ITS DIALOG WITH DEBRA TO LEARN ABOUT THIS ASPECT OF THE ART BUSINESS.

http://www.debraforce.com

DEBRA, THE GALLERY HAS AN EXTREMELY ACTIVE AND IMPRESSIVE TRACK RECORD OF STRONG RELATIONSHIPS WITH NUMEROUS MUSEUMS. HOW DID THAT COME ABOUT?

I started out more in the museum field and have an academic background, so have always felt a special affinity for institutions.  Throughout my career, I have made a point of visiting the curator or director of the art museum wherever I am traveling and have welcomed them to the gallery.  At times, we’ve organized small events for museum collecting groups and patrons, including special Saturday visits to discuss American art, using our inventory as visuals.  I have also spoken at various institutions and to their collecting groups, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the High Museum, etc. 

I have always attempted to match works of art with the right institution and find it rewarding to do so.  Museums to which we have sold works in recent times include:  Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Vero Beach Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Montclair Art Museum, and Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among many others.

Norman Bluhm
X, 1964
Oil on canvas

WHAT WOULD YOU DEFINE AS THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A SALE TO A COLLECTOR AND A SALE TO A MUSEUM?

Both are rewarding, especially if helping a client build a collection; there is a sense of pride in coming up with a theme or plan and finding works to illustrate the goal.  From the museum standpoint, it is so exciting to place a work in an institution where it will be studied and admired for posterity.  It is less interesting to work with clients who are mostly buying art for decorative purposes, but it can be challenging just the same.

Martin Johnson Heade
Cluster of Roses In a Glass
Circa 1887-1895

THE GALLERY IS A REGULAR EXHIBITOR AND PARTICIPANT IN SOME VERY PRESTIGIOUS ART FAIRS. WHICH ONES DO YOU FIND THE MOST PRODUCTIVE AND WHY, IN TERMS OF ATTENDANCE, SALES AND INTRODUCING NEW COLLECTORS TO THE GALLERY

We do a variety of art fairs to reach different audiences.  The best one for traditional American art is the one called The American Art Fair (TAAF) which takes place every Nov. at the same time as the major American Paintings auctions.  We have sold major works there, including ones by Martin Johnson Heade, Thomas LeClear, Thomas Hart Benton, and Oscar Bluemner.  It is the only fair that extols traditional American art; no works by living artists are allowed.

Milton Avery
Pink Island, White Waves, 1959
Oil on canvasboard

Of late, because of the emphasis on art from the second half of the 20th Century and 21st Century, we have exhibited at the Seattle Art Fair in August and Art Miami in December.  In both cases, we have focused upon Post-War era works as well as Modernism.  These fairs give us a chance to meet new clients and to exhibit works that we do not feature in the gallery on a regular basis.  We might also show works by living artists such as Wolf Kahn, Wayne Thiebaud, or Jamie Wyeth.

John Marin
Hudson River Galley, 1911
watercolor on paper

The Art Fair, sponsored by the ADAA in New York in March, is a favorite of ours.  It also allows us to promote our 20th-century material, generally with a thematic approach such as a tribute to the 100th anniversary of the Armory Show of 1913, social commentary, or urban/rural landscape.  We have consistently sold well at this fair, selling works by Marsden Hartley, Walt Kuhn, Charles Sheeler, Max Weber, Charles Burchfield, John Marin, and Alice Neel, among others.

We have also tried fairs in Palm Beach and Chicago as well as others in New York, always experimenting with new venues to determine where we best fit.

THE GALLERY ALSO PROVIDES LICENSED APPRAISAL SERVICES. WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL AND WHAT DO YOU PROVIDE?

I have been doing appraisals for over 30 years, beginning when I was at Christie’s.  We presently provide formal insurance valuations for both private collectors and museums and assist the latter with insurance figures for exhibition loans.  Over the years, we have appraised entire museum collections.  We do not presently do gift tax or estate appraisals, but we do offer consultation and recommendations for clients in need of either.

O. Louis Guglielmi
Elements of the Street, 1947
Oil on canvas

THE GALLERY TAKES WORKS ON CONSIGNMENT ON OCCASION. WHAT ARE THE CRITERIA WHEN CONSIDERING A WORK OF ART FOR RESALE?

We try to find the best quality works that we can from any period of American art, beginning in the 18th Century up to about 1980. 

For example, we have portraits by Benjamin West and Thomas Sully, landscapes by Jasper Cropsey and Thomas Moran, still lifes by Heade and William Harnett, genre scenes by Eastman Johnson and Winslow Homer, Ashcan works by Robert Henri, William Glackens, and Everett Shinn, Modernist pieces by Stuart Davis, Marsden Hartley, and Arthur Dove, Regionalist scenes by Thomas Hart Benton, and Surrealist and Magic Realist pieces by George Tooker and O. Louis Guglielmi, among others. 

Winslow Homer
Green Apples, 1866
Oil on canvas

We attempt to find the best of any given artist and work with pieces in a variety of price ranges to accommodate clients with varying pocketbooks.  Generally, most of our inventory is on consignment; it is very difficult to buy works at auction for resale, given public access to price records on the internet.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, DEBRA WILL CONTINUE TO OUTLINE THE EXTENSIVE SCOPE OF SERVICES THAT THE GALLERY PROVIDES.

WE LOOK FORWARD TO HAVING A BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF THE HIGH STANDARDS THAT THE GALLERY SETS IN PROVIDING EXPERTISE IN EVERY ASPECT OF THE BUYING, EXHIBITING AND SELLING OF AMERICA ART.

UNTIL THEN, THANK YOU ALL!

 

 

NB The works illustrated in this blog are from the gallery inventory

Artists choosing artists at the Mary Boone Gallery with Ron Warren

Laurie Simmons: Clothes Make the Man: 1990-1994
Retrospective at Mary Boone Gallery
April 27 – July 27, 2018

IN 1991, NEARLY THIRTY YEARS AGO, FOR AN INSTALLATION AT MARY BOONE GALLERY, BARBARA KRUGER CREATED A TOTAL ENVIRONMENT OF WORDS AND IMAGES COVERING THE WALLS, CEILING, AND FLOOR. IN 1994, KRUGER REFINED THIS IDEA BY SEAMLESSLY PAPERING THE GALLERY WALLS, TILING THE FLOOR AND INTRODUCING A BOOMING RECORDED VOICE-OVER. THESE WERE RADICAL AND REVOLUTIONARY ART FORMS AT THE TIME. TODAY, BARBARA KRUGER COMMANDS AN EVEN MORE INFLUENTIAL AND INNOVATIVE PRESENCE THAN SHE DID THEN. MARY BOONE GALLERY HAS SUPPORTED HER IDEAS AND HER WORK SINCE SHE WAS FIRST REPRESENTED BY THE GALLERY, TRUE FOR KRUGER AND NUMEROUS OTHER ARTISTS WHOSE WORK HAS EXPANDED AND DEVELOPED OVER THE YEARS, CAREFULLY NATURED BY THEIR GALLERIST AND THEN DISSEMINATED IN GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS AROUND THE WORLD TO GAIN RECOGNITION IN THE ART WORLD AND VALUE IN THE ART MARKET.

I, FOR ONE, FIND THIS CONSISTENCY OF VISION AND FIERCE DETERMINATION EXTRAORDINARILY IMPRESSIVE.

Barbara Kruger
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG WELCOMES RON WARREN, PARTNER AND DIRECTOR AT THE GALLERY, TO DISCUSS HOW THE GALLERY SELECTS ITS ARTISTS AND ITS CURRENT AND FUTURE PLANS.

RON, PLEASE TELL US ABOUT THE GALLERY’S HISTORY WITH BARBARA KRUGER.

Barbara is an artist whose work has truly influenced culture! The look of the iconic image and text works she showed with us throughout the 1980s and 1990s is frequently mimicked in advertising and graphic design, not to mention numerous student art projects that appear online. Barbara is an old-school artist, a teacher, no assistants, operating on her own ideas and sharp perceptions of people and power. Barbara consistently applies new materials, technologies, and ideologies to her work. Our shows of her work in the 1980s included large photo-silkscreened works on vinyl, a process developed for outdoor advertising. In 1991 she pioneered the concept of a room-sized installation, covering the walls, floor, and ceiling with images and texts, and in 1994 added to this a booming narrated soundtrack. Our 2004 and 2010 exhibitions were four-channel video projections. Presently she is working mostly with large-scale architectural installations and public art works, like the wide-ranging project she did last Fall for Performa 17.  An exhibition of her work is being organized by the Art Institute of Chicago for 2020.

Barbara Kruger
Performa 17

How does the gallery identify new artists that they are interested in showing? It is a group decision amongst the directors or exclusively Mary Boone’s?

Artists are great auditors of other artists’ work. We follow up on recommendations of the artists we show, and the entire staff discusses weekly any interesting shows we have seen or ideas for exhibitions.

I have always felt that Mary Boone is truly dedicated to her artists. Are artists assigned on a day-to-day basis to various directors or is the scheduling of exhibitions, at the gallery, other galleries and in museum exhibitions a group process?

We all work together for all the artists.

Art fairs are such a dominant venue for exposure and sales. Which fairs does Mary Boone Gallery participate in and why?

The emphasis on art fairs is a relatively new thing. The art calendar has become crowded with so many fairs world-wide, it does put a strain on the galleries, as well as the artists to produce enough work. Some galleries maintain staff that only travel from fair to fair! In order to show the best selection of fresh material, we have made the decision to show only at Art Basel Miami Beach. Our booth at the fair is very much a hands-on extension of the Gallery.  

 

Tomoo Gokita
Installation shot

How are you reaching the Asian market?

With the internet and Instagram, the art world really has become global—it’s a cliché, but it’s true. There is an extraordinary network of information and images being exchanged. Many collectors from Asia have come to us through interest in the artists we show. Often that initial interest is driven by our exhibition of artists from Asia, like Ai Weiwei or Tomoo Gokita, and then the collector becomes intrigued by other artists in our program. We also share our artists with galleries in China, Japan, and Korea.

 

Matt Bass
Installation
May 2018

What are some of the exhibitions the gallery is planning in the year ahead?

Our current show features new paintings by Math Bass whose work I love. Math was a student of Barbara Kruger in the MFA program at UCLA. She had a Project Space exhibition last year at the Yuz Museum, Shanghai.  Although Math has done performance at the Whitney Museum and project exhibitions with MoMA PS1 and has the current Lobby Artist Commission at the Jewish Museum, this will be her first solo New York gallery exhibition.

Check out the great review of this exhibition in the  May 28, 1918 prestigious New Yorker magazine.

RON, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR A GREAT SERIES OF POSTS!

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, WE INTRODUCE OUR FIRST EXCLUSIVELY PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY, NEW YORK’S YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY. IT IS A PLEASURE TO LEARN ABOUT THIS VERY SPECIFIC AREA OF COLLECTING WITH THE GALLERY DIRECTOR, MATTHEW WHITWORTH.

STAY TUNED!

Building bridges: artist/gallery/collector, with Max Teicher of Gagosian Gallery

GAGOSIAN GALLERY LONDON April 27 - June 17, 2016 "Alberto Giacometti Yves Klein: In Search of the Absolute" Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

GAGOSIAN GALLERY LONDON
April 27 – June 17, 2016
“Alberto Giacometti Yves Klein: In Search of the Absolute”
Installation view
Photo by Mike Bruce

GAGOSIAN GALLERY CURATES MUSEUM QUALITY EXHIBITIONS ON A REGULAR BASIS, OFTEN THEMATIC IN CONTENT OR ON OCCASION FOCUSING ON A SPECIFIC PERIOD OF AN INDIVIDUAL ARTIST’S WORK. THE GALLERY ENJOYS A RICH HISTORY OF EXCEPTIONAL EXHIBITIONS DEDICATED TO THE WORK OF ALEXANDER CALDER, JOHN CHAMBERLAIN, WILLEM DE KOONING, LUCIO FONTANA, ANDY WARHOL, AND OTHERS. FOR EXAMPLE, A SERIES OF OUTSTANDING SURVEY EXHIBITIONS EXPLORED DIFFERENT PERIODS OF PICASSO’S WORK, CURATED BY THE ESTEEMED PICASSO EXPERT, JOHN RICHARDSON.

ARTISTS, ARTISTS’ ESTATES AND COLLECTORS ANTICIPATE THAT GALLERIES  OF THIS CALIBER WILL NOT ONLY SUPPORT THE WORK OF ARTISTS THEY REPRESENT WITH A MULTI-FACETED PLATFORM OF WORLD-WIDE GALLERY AND MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS BUT ALSO WITH  ART HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND CONNOISSEURSHIP. THUS, IN ADDITION TO THE SHOWS THEMSELVES,  THE GALLERY PUBLISHES SCHOLARLY EXHIBITION CATALOGUES AND ARTISTS’ MONOGRAPHS AND PROVIDES A HIGHLY SOPHISTICATED PUBLICITY  NETWORK THAT REACHES EVERY POTENTIAL AUDIENCE BY BOTH TRADITIONAL METHODS AND SOPHISTICATED 2.0 MARKETING. http://www.gagosian.com/

GAGOSIAN GALLERY CHELSEA September 10 - October 17, 2015 "ROY LICHTENSTEIN: Greene Street Mural" Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

GAGOSIAN GALLERY CHELSEA
September 10 – October 17, 2015
“ROY LICHTENSTEIN: Greene Street Mural”
Installation view
Photo by Rob McKeever

THESE ARE THE ACTIVITIES AND EVENTS THAT COMMAND PUBLIC ATTENTION. BEHIND THE SCENES, NURTURING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GALLERY AND ARTIST IS AS CRUCIAL A FUNCTION FOR THE WELL-BEING OF BOTH ARTIST AND DEALER.

THE LRFA BLOG IS VERY PLEASED TO CONTINUE ITS CONVERSATION WITH MAX TEICHER OF GAGOSIAN GALLERY.

MAX’S FIRST-HAND EXPERIENCE AS AN ARTIST, SHARED BY MANY OF US ON THE BUSINESS SIDE OF THE ARTS, FOSTERS HIS EMPATHY AND RAPPORT WITH ARTISTS. AS A COLLECTOR IN HIS OWN RIGHT, HIS APPRECIATION OF CONTEMPORARY ART AND THE DECISION-MAKING SELECTION PROCESS ADDS A DIMENSION TO HIS EXPERTISE AND EXPERIENCE.

GAGOSIAN GALLERY NEW YORK March 10 - 19, 2016 "Masterworks from the Chinese Past" In collaboration with Gisèle Croës Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

GAGOSIAN GALLERY NEW YORK
March 10 – 19, 2016
“Masterworks from the Chinese Past”
In collaboration with Gisèle Croës
Installation view
Photo by Rob McKeever

MAX, WHEN DID YOU FIRST START AT GAGOSIAN AND IN WHAT CAPACITY?

I started interning at the gallery when I was 19. I was always happy to help in any way. I was then lucky enough to be an art handler. That helped me build personal relationships with objects and I learned the process of how the gallery works and how much effort people put into it.

HOW DID YOUR AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY EVOLVE OVER THE EIGHT YEARS YOU HAVE WORKED AT GAGOSIAN? DOES THE GALLERY HAVE A STRICT HIERARCHY OF RESPONSIBILITY OR IS THERE A FLUIDITY AND OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN VARIOUS ASPECTS OF GALLERY MANAGEMENT?

I can’t speak for everyone else’s development here, but I do feel like it is a terrific place for people to find their role on the team. Everyone is different and everyone has specific purposes and this is the kind of place that brings out the best in these people.

GAGOSIAN GALLERY CHELSEA February 17 - April 18, 2015 "In the Studio: Paintings" Curated by John Elderfield Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

GAGOSIAN GALLERY CHELSEA
February 17 – April 18, 2015
“In the Studio: Paintings”
Curated by John Elderfield
Installation view
Photo by Rob McKeever

DO YOU COLLECT AND, IF SO, WHAT TYPES OF WORK AND WHY?

Of course I collect! I think that one of our great collectors here at Gagosian said it well. He said that the moment you put your first piece on the wall, you can no longer live without art. My collection is made up of artists that have an appreciation for technical skill and craftsmanship. I find it impossible to solely collect so I often go on studio visits and engage in brainstorming with the artists. There are several that I have consistently supported for several years now.

DID YOU PROPOSE EXHIBITIONS OF SPECIFIC ARTISTS AND HOW DO THESE EXHIBITS AND ARTISTS REFLECT YOUR INTEREST IN THE CONTEMPORARY ART WORLD?

I have been fortunate enough to build bridges between many artists, curators, gallerists, and collectors. Sometimes an exhibition can start from a casual conversation with an artist to years of suggesting their work to others. Great art always finds a way of being presented to large audiences.

UNREALISM The Moore Building, Miami Design District Art Basel Miami December 2015

UNREALISM
The Moore Building, Miami Design District
Art Basel Miami December 2015

AT LAST DECEMBER’S MIAMI ART BASEL, GAGOSIAN LAUNCHED AN ENORMOUS EXHIBITION OF FIGURATIVE WORKS ENTITLED UNREALISM  IN COLLABORATION WITH JEFFREY DEITCH. I HAD THE PLEASURE OF VIEWING THE EXHIBIT WITH YOU AS MY GUIDE AND BENEFITED FROM YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF SUCH A WIDE RANGE OF FIGURAL ARTISTS.

WHAT DOES THE RENEWED INTEREST IN FIGURATIVE PAINTING AND SCULPTURE REPRESENT TO YOU AND WHAT DO YOU THINK THE INFLUENCE OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND DIGITAL PRINTING HAS ON THIS RENAISSANCE?

I think these things come in waves. I think that post-war era figurative painting has come in and out. I have even heard of several universities that banned it until only 10 years ago. I think technology is always expanding the abilities for artists to create. Ever since oil painting took over tempera painting in the renaissance, technology has continued to open windows. Today with digital photography, everyone with a mobile phone is a curator or an artist on Instagram or social media with what they are putting up there.

GAGOSIAN GALLERY LONDON BRITANNIA STREET November 2012 - January 2013 "ZENG FANZHI" Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

GAGOSIAN GALLERY LONDON
BRITANNIA STREET
November 2012 – January 2013
“ZENG FANZHI”
Installation view
Photo by Mike Bruce

IN THE NEXT LRFA POST, MAX WILL SHARE HIS INSIGHTS ON THE ART OF COLLECTING ART. HIS EXPERIENCE AS BOTH AN ASTUTE COLLECTOR AND  DEALER PROVIDES A 360 DEGREE PERSPECTIVE.  DO ASK MAX ANY QUESTIONS YOU HAVE ON THIS SUBJECT.

THANKS FOR READING!