Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

INTERNATIONAL ART ADVISORY SERVICE

Tag: Georgia O’Keeffe

The Bank of America Private Bank Art Conservation Project, with Art Lending Services VP, Dana Prussian

 

Dana Prussian Art Lending Services, Bank of America Private Bank

 

BANK OF AMERICA PRIVATE BANK OFFERS EXTENSIVE ART LENDING SERVICES. AS WELL AS COLLATERALIZING ART COLLECTIONS, THE BANK HELPS COLLECTORS TO DESIGN ESTATE PLANS THAT TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION THE VALUE OF THEIR ART COLLECTIONS, BOTH AS AN ALTERNATIVE ASSET AND AS A LEGACY. THEY ASSIST IN THE CONSIGNMENT PROCESS FOR A SALE OF A WORK OR A COLLECTION AT AUCTION. APART FROM THE ART OF THE BUSINESS OF ART, BANK OF AMERICA PRIVATE BANK HAS A TRULY IMPRESSIVE RANGE OF PHILANTHROPIC ENDEAVORS THAT SUPPORT MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS, ART PANELS AND LECTURES, ART FAIRS AND ART CONSERVATION.

ART AND CULTURE

Bank of America believes the arts matter: they help economies thrive, help individuals connect with each other and across cultures, and educate and enrich societies. We support more than 2,000 visual and performing arts organizations worldwide that provide inspirational and educational sustenance, anchor communities, create jobs, complement school curricula, and generate substantial revenue for local businesses.

Vincent van Gogh
Starry Night
MoMA Collection

BANK OF AMERICA ART CONSERVATION PROJECT

We are pleased to present the 2019 Bank of America Art Conservation Project grant recipients. In reviewing the twenty-two projects, we are reminded of the tremendous need for art conservation in cultural institutions across the globe. And we are honored and proud to help these institutions and others preserve their treasures for generations to come.

With this year’s selections, we will have provided funding for more than 170 projects in thirty-three countries, representing thousands of works across different art movements, media and time periods- and, importantly, cultures. All the works we help to conserve share one thing in common however. They reflect the creativity, ingenuity and passion of people throughout the world over hundreds, even thousands, of years.

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO WELCOME BACK DANA PRUSSIAN, VP, ART LENDING SERVICES, BANK OF AMERICA. HER BACKGROUND IN BOTH ART AND FINANCE MAKES HER THE PERFECT FIT FOR THIS PROFESSION AND HER ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL STEPS WERE KEENLY FOCUSED ON THIS DREAM JOB SINCE THE BEGINNING.

DANA, WELCOME BACK TO THE LRFA BLOG!

HOW DOES BANK OF AMERICA PRIVATE BANK COMPETE IN THIS HIGHLY CHARGED MARKET WITH SOME OF THE OTHER ART SERVICE COMPANIES, EITHER AT BANKS AND INVESTMENT FIRMS OR PRIVATE SPECIALIZED COMPANIES?

Paul Cezanne
The Bather
MoMA Collection

Let’s just say I followed Bank of America’s progress veryyyy closely and jumped the minute they opened a role. 😉

WHAT ARE THE CRITERIA FOR COLLECTORS LENDING AGAINST COLLECTIONS TO UNLOCK CAPITAL?  HAS THAT CRITERIA CHANGED OVER THE YEARS TO REFLECT THE GAINS AND GLOBALIZATION OF THE ART MARKET AND IN WHAT WAYS?

Our criteria has not changed much over the years (collectors need a certain sized collection with both commercial and diverse works and a robust balance sheet), but appetite for art lending has expanded greatly. Since interest rates have been hovering around historic lows, more clients are looking to use this as a balance sheet arbitrage, unlocking capital from art to redeploy into higher-return areas of their financial lives. We have also seen more clients use art loans as working capital lines to expand privately held companies. Since the elimination of the 1031 Like-Kind Exchange in 2017, it has also become prevalent to leverage art to generate liquidity.

WHAT ARE WAYS IN WHICH AN ART COLLECTION CAN DIVERSIFY A PORTFOLIO?

We never recommend that a client start an art collection as an investment or a way to diversify his portfolio. Passion comes first. Once someone has been bitten by the collecting bug (it’s real), they should consider whether their collection fits into their estate plan and how they want to manage it over time. It’s still quite common to see rising collectors go to great lengths to prove they’re not simply investors, whether it’s by marketing themselves quietly to dealers or acquiring non-commercial works to round out their collections.

Pablo Picasso
Three Musicians
MoMA Collection

BANK OF AMERICA PRIVATE BANK SUPPORTS A GREAT MANY MUSUEM EXHIBITIONS, ART PANELS, ART EDUCATIONAL EVENTS. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS THAT WERE THE MOST INTERESTING OR EFFECTIVE?

Bank of America provides unbelievable support to museums and art institutions worldwide. We get to reap those benefits by helping deliver unique experiences and programming to our collectors. You probably saw that we sponsored the reopening of MoMA and the conservation of Starry Night and other iconic works. We took small groups of collectors through MoMA’s Conservation Lab while the museum was closed so they could see these works off the wall, unframed, and under a microscope. Cezanne’s The Bather, Van Gogh’s Starry Night, Picasso’s Three Musicians. I was blown away. So were our clients. In Paris BofA sponsored the Da Vinci exhibit at the Louvre and hosted a small private group. 

SOME OF THE OTHER 2019 CONSERVATION PROJECT BENEFICIARIES INCLUDE “SPRING” IN THE COLLECTION OF THE GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM IN SANTA FE. THIS LARGE-SCALED WORK REPRESENTS A TURNING POINT IN O’KEEFFE’S LIFE AT A TIME WHEN SHE HAS THE NEWFOUND FREEDOM TO MOVE PERMANENTLY FROM NEW YORK TO SANTE FE. THE WORK INCORPORATES ALL OF THE ICONS EVOCATIVE OF NEW MEXICO: LANDSCAPE, BONE AND FLOWER.

Georgia O’Keeffe Spring, 1948

AND WERE AS FAR-RANGING AS THE RESTORATION OF THREE TAPESTRIES BY MARLENE DUMAS, “THE BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT”, IN THE CONSTITUTIONAL COURT ART COLLECTION IN JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA. THE TRIPTYCH CONSISTS OF THREE FIBER WORKS WEIGHING APPROXIMATELY 620 POUNDS, AND A ROBUST PRESERVATION-APPROPRIATE HANGING SYSTEM WAS DESIGNED FOR PERMANENT DISPLAY.

 

Marlene Dumas
The Benefit of Doubt
Tapestry Triptych

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, DANA WILL SHARE HER ASTUTE PERCEPTION OF THE CURRENT AND FUTURE ART MARKET. TUNE IN THEN!

 

 

The LRFA blog welcomes Meg Malloy, partner at Sikkema Jenkins & Co. gallery

Meg Malloy
Partner
Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO. ENJOYS A LONG AND RESPECTED HISTORY IN THE CONTEMPORARY ART WORLD FOR DISCOVERING EMERGING ARTISTS WHO GO ON TO GAIN GREAT CRITICAL AND COMMERCIAL SUCCESS AND SUPPORTING ESTABLISHED CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS WHOSE CAREERS THEY NURTURE. LOCATED AT 530 WEST 22nd STREET IN THE WEST CHELSEA ARTS DISTRICT IN NEW YORK CITY, THE GALLERY WAS FOUNDED IN 1991 BY BRENT SIKKEMA AS WOOSTER GARDENS. BRENT SIKKEMA BEGAN HIS GALLERY WORK IN 1971 AT THE DIRECTOR OF EXHIBITIONS AT THE VISUAL STUDIES WORKSHOP IN ROCHESTER, NEW YORK. HE OPENED HIS FIRST GALLERY IN BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, IN 1976. MICHAEL JENKINS, WHO HAD WORKED ON PROJECTS WITH THE GALLERY SINCE ITS OPENING IN 1991, JOINED AS DIRECTOR IN 1996, AND BECAME A PARTNER IN 2003.

Sikkema Jenkins Gallery
530 West 22nd Street
Chelsea, New York

SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO. WAS ORIGINALLY LOCATED ON WOOSTER STREET IN SoHo AND IN 1999 MOVED TO ITS PRESENT CHELSEA LOCATION SUBSEQUENTLY UNDERGOING EXTENSIVE RENOVATION AND EXPANSION.  THE GALLERY IS AN EXTREMELY INVITING ENVIRONMENT, WITH A DEDICATED AND ACCESSIBLE STAFF EAGER TO EDUCATE AS WELL AS TO PLACE WORKS.

MEG MALLOY, A PARTNER AT SIKKEMA JENKINS, IS THE PERFECT REPRESENTATIVE OF THE OPEN UNPRETENTIOUS SPIRIT OF THE GALLERY AND THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO WELCOME HER TODAY.

MEG, THANK YOU, IN THIS BUSY SEASON OF THE ART YEAR, FOR YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO THE LRFA BLOG.

Vik Muniz: Surfaces
Current exhibition
Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

WHAT WERE YOUR EXPERIENCES GROWING UP THAT ENCOURAGED AN INTEREST IN ART?

I was born in Chicago and raised in Glencoe, a suburb north of the city. I am the oldest of six.   My mother had wanted to be an artist, and going to museums was a part of my childhood.  The Art Institute also had a great outreach program and before any school trip there, museum docents would come to school and educate us about what we might see.  My parents were involved in a local theater group and I took part in the youth version, always on the management side as a producer or v.p.-  never as a performer.    In high school and college, friends and I used to take the train to the city and to go the Art Institute.  We would just wander.  I was always struck by Georgia O’Keeffe’s Sky Above Clouds, which was installed at the top of a grand staircase at the museum: it seemed so majestic, and it motivated me to read her biography. I loved thinking about her work, and what sounded to me like an impossibly exciting life in art.

 

Georgia O’Keeffe
Sky Above Clouds

DID YOU PAINT OR HAVE AMBITIONS TO BECOME A PROFESSIONAL ARTIST?

 I never had any talent for art making, though  I enjoyed it.  I really thought I would go into publishing. I worked on the school newspapers in both junior high and high school.  One close friend did have parents who were collectors, and another had a mom who ran a gallery downtown.    

WHAT WAS YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND, AND HOW DID IT LEAD YOU INTO THE ART WORLD?

 I went to The University of Illinois at Champaign Urbana and studied Comp Lit.  

My plan was to follow my favorite aunt’s career path in publishing.   Because comp lit is interdisciplinary, we often looked at visual art. My interest in its history was piqued, and I added art history classes to my course of study.  I was a resident advisor and had a number of artists on my floor  – I  loved visiting their studios and talking about what they  were doing.

Kara Walker
Turbine Commission Tate Modern

Then  I took a museum studies class and decided I should go into museum education.   With that goal in mind, I decided to go to grad school in art history, and ended up at UC Berkeley. There I had a job at the art museum bookstore, and then became the intern for Connie Lewallen, a wonderful curator and human being.   She ran the Matrix program, which focused on one contemporary artist at a time in a frequently changing exhibition program, always with an accompanying brochure.  I loved the variety and the engagement with the artists and their ideas.  It was compelling.  I also became the de facto house sitter for the curators — all of whom had great contemporary art and libraries, and I loved being immersed in those environments.

Erin Shirreff
San Francisco Museum of Art

SO MANY INFLUENCES LEADING YOU TO NEW YORK AND A CAREER IN THE ARTS. IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, MEG WILL  DETAIL HER FIRST EXPERIENCES IN THE NEW YORK ART WORLD.

PLEASE JOIN US!

Shifting tastes: the market for American art with expert Debra Force of Debra Force Fine Art

AT THE AMERICAN ART AUCTIONS, FINE PAINTINGS, SCULPTURES AND WORKS ON PAPER ARE OFFERED FROM THE COLONIAL TO THE POST-WAR PERIOD, INCLUDING WORKS BY THE HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL, THE AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISTS AND THE ASH CAN SCHOOL. OVER THE PAST DECADE, THE AMERICAN ART DEPARTMENT AT CHRISTIE’S STATES THAT IT HAS SET MORE THAN 100 WORLD RECORDS, ACHIEVING RECORD PRICES FOR IMPORTANT NAMES SUCH AS EDWARD HOPPER, ANDREW WYETH AND GEORGIA O’KEEFFE. HOWEVER, BOTH THE AUCTION HOUSES AND GALLERIES SPECIALIZING IN THIS AREA HAVE SEEN A DOWNTURN IN THIS MARKET.

https://www.christies.com/departments/American-Art-3-1.aspx

ONE OF THE EXCEPTIONS WAS THE CHRISTIE’S SALE OF THE EXTRAORDINARY DAVID AND PEGGY ROCKEFELLER COLLECTION THAT REPRESENTED ONE OF THE BEST SINGLE OWNER COLLECTIONS TO COME TO MARKET. HIGHLIGHTS OF AN AMERICAN ART COLLECTION DESCRIBED AS “VIRTUALLY ENCYCLOPAEDIC” INCLUDED EDWARD HOPPER’S CAPE ANN GRANITE, PAINTED IN THE SUMMER OF 1928 ($8.4m), GEORGIA O’KEEFFE’S NEAR ABIQUIU, NEW MEXICO ($8.4m) and MILTON AVERY’S WOMEN WITH REBOZA ($2.5m). THIS SALE, HOWEVER, WAS AN EXCEPTION TO THE GENERAL CLIMATE OF THE AMERICAN MARKET.

WE ARE FORTUNATE TO HAVE DEBRA FORCE, OF DEBRA FORCE FINE ART, A SEASONED EXPERT IN AMERICAN ART OF EVERY PERIOD, PROVIDE HER ANALYSIS OF THE PRESENT AND FUTURE MARKET IN AMERICAN ART.

http://www.debraforce.com/

DEBRA, HOW DO YOU VIEW THE AMERICAN MARKET AT THE PRESENT TIME AND HOW HAS IT CHANGED IN THE LAST DECADE?

The traditional American art market is stable.  It had been at its height up to 2008, but became much softer after that date.  As collectors become older, they are no longer buying as much and younger people do not seem to have an interest in this aspect of Fine Art.  Thus, we are dealing with a more limited market base and of course, do not have international interest in this area. 

Prices for many things are much reduced from what they were over ten years ago, particularly for early and historical material, genre painting, Hudson River painting, and Ashcan artists.  However, we are seeing some revitalization with certain artists in these areas as well as with the American Impressionists.  For those looking for this type of material, there are more reasonable prices and, in some cases, bargains to be had.  Museums are finding that they can now buy artists on their wish lists that fall into these categories. 

Joseph Stella
The Red Pitcher
Oil on canvas

American Modernism and Regionalism, as well as works by African-American and women artists, are very hot, while Surrealism and Magic Realism are rising in popularity. Many of the post-war second- and third-tier Abstract Expressionists are also coming under the umbrella of traditional American art as we move more solidly into the 21st Century.

WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN ART MARKET? DO YOU FEEL THAT SOME OF THE LESSER KNOWN ARTISTS WHO WERE WILDLY COLLECTED BY THE LAST GENERATION WILL REBOUND IN TERMS OF PRESENCE AND PRICE?

It is my hope that younger people will turn to and revere traditional American art, which suffers somewhat like the American furniture and decorative arts market, as time marches on.  To do so, American history needs to be taught at both secondary and college levels, museums need to exhibit this type of art and not just focus upon what is “sexy” or of the moment, and auction houses and galleries need to embrace it, rather than shying away from it. 

Milton Avery
Woman with Rebozo, 1946
Christie’s sale, David Rockefeller Collection

Much of the material that is less collectible today does not receive adequate recognition in the marketplace and is routinely relegated to lesser sales or online auctions rather than in the mainstream or in prominent sales.  [Certainly, although the provenance had added cache to the works sold at the Rockefeller sale at Christie’s, the overwhelming exposure did wonders to attract buyers to much of the 19th-century material that sold for double or more what they had been making.]  The validity of the past that has much to teach us in understanding the world today as well as the evolution of Contemporary art, needs to be made apparent to younger generations. 

Georgia O’Keeffe
New Mexico – near Taos 1929
Christie’s sale, David Rockefeller Collection

The other challenge is garnering international interest in American art, as we head toward a more global society.  This is already happening to a degree as the Terra Foundation and others sponsor exhibitions of American art abroad that have been well received to the audiences there; hopefully, this will translate into the market as well. 

As older collectors divest their collections, more major works of art will presumably enter the market and therefore, should generate renewed interest among known buyers as well as attracting new ones.

Presently, buyers are more attracted to well-known artists rather than those less renowned.  Until the market for traditional American art is more buoyant overall, I fear that more minor artists will continue to be neglected.  The only departure from this state is the collectability of lesser Modernist and Post-War artists who are now embraced, as prices for the more blue-chip works from this era are escalating.

DEBRA, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR KNOWLEDGE, EXPERTISE AND ANALYSIS OF AMERICAN ART.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, I AM HONORED TO INTRODUCE WENDY CROMWELL, WHO SERVES ON THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ART ADVISORS (APAA), AN OUTSTANDING NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION MADE UP OF LEADING ART ADVISORS, CURATORS AND CORPORATE ART MANAGERS. APAA IS DEDICATED TO ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING THE HIGHEST PRINCIPLES AND GUIDELINES FOR ACQUIRING, MAINTAINING AND SELLING ART.

PLEASE JOIN US!

 

Hirschl and Adler’s Eric Baumgartner on the American art market

 

Edward Hopper Hirschl and Adler Galleries New York

Edward Hopper
Hirschl and Adler Galleries
New York

OVER THE PAST DECADE, AMERICAN ART HAS COMMANDED OVER 100 WORLD RECORDS AT AUCTION. AT THE SOTHEBY’S SALE OF AMERICAN ART LAST NOVEMBER,  GEORGIA O’KEEFFE’S EXQUISITE JIMSON WEED, WHITE FLOWER NO. 1 SOLD FOR $44.4 MILLION, BREAKING THE PREVIOUS RECORD FOR A FEMALE ARTIST AT AUCTION. http://www.sothebys.com/en/news-video/blogs/all-blogs/sotheby-s-at-large/2014/11/female-artist-record-iconic-okeeffe-flower-painting.html AT CHRISTIE’S IN DECEMBER 2013, THE DEPARTMENT SET A NEW WORLD RECORD FOR EDWARD HOPPER WITH THE SALE OF EAST WIND OVER WEEHAWKEN AT $40,485,000 MILLION. http://www.cnbc.com/id/101249817#.

AMERICAN ART HAS BEEN AT THE FOREFRONT OF THE MARKET FOR MANY YEARS AND HAD GAINED A PRONOUNCED UPTICK IN RECENT YEARS. IT IS AN EXTREMELY SELECTIVE MARKET AND THE DEPARTMENTS AT BOTH AUCTION HOUSES ARE REAPING THE REWARDS OF CAREFUL EDITING OF THE WORKS FOR SALE AND EQUALLY JUDICIOUS ESTIMATES. THERE HAVE BEEN A “HANDFUL OF PEOPLE OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES, WHICH IS VERY EXCITING”,  ACCORDING TO ELIZABETH GOLDBERG WHO HEADS SOTHEBY’S AMERICAN ART DEPARTMENT. FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, THERE IS DEFINITELY  CYCLICAL INTEREST IN DIFFERENT PERIODS OF AMERICAN ART. OF LATE, AMERICAN IMPRESSIONIST MASTERS SUCH AS WILLIAM MERRITT CHASE AND CHILDE HASSAM HAVE TAKEN A BACKSEAT TO THE ENERGY AND MORE AVANT-GARDE SPIRIT OF THE AMERICAN MODERNIST MASTERS.

OF COURSE, QUALITY IS THE NORTH STAR OF ALL COLLECTING.

THE  LRFA BLOG IS VERY PLEASED TO HAVE AMERICAN ART EXPERT, ERIC BAUMGARTNER OF HIRSCHL AND ADLER GALLERIES SHARE HIS ASTUTE KNOWLEDGE OF THE AMERICAN ART MARKET.  THE GALLERY IS LOCATED AT THE CROWN BUILDING ON 57th AND FIFTH IN NEW YORK, THE EXHIBITIONS REFLECT THE GALLERY’S EXTENSIVE HISTORY, KNOWLEDGE AND LOVE OF AMERICAN ART AND FURNITURE.  http://www.hirschlandadler.com/

ERIC, DO YOU SEE AN EBB AND FLOW OF INTEREST IN DIFFERENT MOVEMENTS AND AREAS OF COLLECTING OF AMERICAN ART AND, IF SO, IN WHAT WAYS?

As far as American art is concerned, most definitely! For instance, middle-range 19th-century American paintings are more challenging to sell today, while on the other hand, interest in a broad spectrum of American modernism is growing. Collectors of modernism are moving beyond the core group of artists associated with Alfred Stieglitz’s gallery stable—Demuth, Hartley, Marin, O’Keeffe, Sheeler—and embracing surrealism (John Atherton, Charles Howard, Kay Sage) and early abstraction (Howard again, Henry Fitch Taylor).

CHARLES HOUGHTON HOWARD Bouquet, 1932 Oil on canvas 31 x 41 inches

CHARLES HOUGHTON HOWARD
Bouquet, 1932
Oil on canvas
31 x 41 inches

Another branch of modernism that is seeing market growth is Regionalism. As great works by the core Regionalists Thomas Hart Benton and Grant Wood have gotten nearly impossible to find, deserving attention is being paid to artists who, in their day, didn’t break through to a national audience: Marvin Cone of Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Alexandre Hogue of West Texas; Joe Jones of Saint Louis, Missouri; and John Rogers Cox of Indiana come to mind.

 

THOMAS COLE An Italian Autumn Oil on canvas 32 x 48 inches

THOMAS COLE
An Italian Autumn
Oil on canvas
32 x 48 inches

Having said that, however, we still feel that there is a viable and competitive audience for blue-chip works by such 19th-century artists as Thomas Cole, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Martin Johnson Heade, and Winslow Homer; it’s an example that buying into real quality never goes out of fashion.
WHAT IS THE NATURE OF THE GALLERY SYSTEM? IS EVERYONE ON STAFF AN EXPERT IN A PARTICULAR AREA AND HOW DOES THE CURATORIAL/EXHIBITION CALENDAR EVOLVE? DO INDIVIDUAL STAFF MEMBERS PROPOSE EXHIBITIONS OR DO YOU HAVE A CURATORIAL TEAM?

Hirschl & Adler Galleries is organized by department: American art, European art, American furniture and decorative arts, and contemporary art. I head the American department, Gregory Hedberg leads our European department, Stuart and Liz Feld head our decorative-arts program, and Shelly Farmer runs our contemporary division, Hirschl & Adler Modern. However, none of us are pigeonholed; for example, I can bring in European paintings on consignment for sale, and have done so on many occasions. Of course, the entire sales staff has full access to our extraordinarily large and diverse inventory, so when it comes time to offering—and, we hope, selling—each sales person can tap into works from any department to meet the needs and interests of our clients. Our gallery exhibition calendar is generally established on a six to nine-month lead, and anyone on our very talented staff can propose and curate an exhibition that fits our program. In fact, two of our more popular and successful summer exhibitions—Duets (2013) and Our American Life (2014)—were organized and curated by our support staff.

DO YOU HAVE A PARTICULAR PERIOD OF ART THAT RESONATES THE MOST WITH YOU?

My love of Hudson River School landscape paintings began in my college years when I wrote my senior honors thesis on John Frederick Kensett’s luminist pictures. Kensett painted many traditional landscapes—scenic views of the Catskills, White Mountains, and Adirondacks—in a picturesque style that prevailed at mid-century, but when he hit the New England coast, particularly the coast of Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island, his compositions turned remarkably spare. I find this dichotomy in his work utterly fascinating, and have often wondered what drove him to adopt such a different style. Kensett, one of the most traditional pictorialists in the Hudson River School, quite suddenly switched to a revolutionary compositional technique of expansive sky, open horizon lines, and an accentuated awareness of atmosphere. Kensett was not alone, of course, as his contemporaries Sanford Robinson Gifford, Martin Johnson Heade, Fitz Henry Lane, and occasionally William Trost Richards, also embraced this compositional formula that we today call luminism.

WILLIAM TROST RICHARDS Along the Shore, New Jersey, 1870 Oil on canvas 14 3/8 x 26 3/8 inches

WILLIAM TROST RICHARDS
Along the Shore, New Jersey, 1870
Oil on canvas
14 3/8 x 26 3/8 inches

DO YOU AND YOUR WIFE, ALSO A KNOWLEDGEABLE AND DEDICATED AMERICAN ART GALLERIST, COLLECT?

My wife, Katherine, and I collect New England furniture from the first half of the 18th century, the so-called William and Mary era. “Collect” is perhaps too generous a term. We own a handful of pieces and enjoy living with them. I personally love photography—I have been pursuing photography myself in a serious way since about 1972—and hope to one day collect vintage photographs. At the moment, our vintage photography collection numbers a grand total of one: a black-and-white photograph of the Norfolk & Western railroad by O. Winston Link. I suppose it’s a start!

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, ERIC BAUMGARTNER WILL INTRODUCE US TO HIRSCHL AND ADLER MODERN. WE WELCOME ALL COMMENTS AND QUESTIONS, AND APPRECIATE YOUR CONTINUED READERSHIP AND PARTICIPATION!