Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

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Tag: Hauser & Wirth

Airport please!to visit Hauser & Wirth Menorca and Rashid Johnson’s extraordinary Sodade exhibition

Rashid Johnson
Sodade
Hauser & Wirth, Menorca

Rashid Johnson is known for his conceptual works that reflect on the themes of race and class. He studied art at Columbia College Chicago and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and he now lives and works in New York. Johnson is a photographer, as well as creates audio installations, videos, and sculptures. In 2019, his first feature-length film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. Johnson’s work is included in the permanent collections of many institutions, including the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.

ARTIST STATEMENT

Young American artist seeks audience to enjoy poly-conscious attempts at post-medium condition production.
Must enjoy race mongering, disparate disconnected thoughts and sunsets (really). Familiarity with the work of Sun Ra, Joseph Beuys, Rosalind Krauss, Richard Pryor, Hans Haacke, Carl Andre and interest in spelunking in the death of identity a plus. I’m looking for an audience with a good attention span that is willing to stay with me through the good and the bad.

I enjoy creating movies, producing sculptures, painting and making photographs. My interests are costuming, Sam Greenlee novels, Godard films and masturbation.
Ability to hold conversation using only rap lyrics, and a sense of humor a must.

Hauser & Wirth Menorca

HAUSER & WIRTH MENORCA

For his first solo exhibition in Spain, Rashid Johnson continues to work with a complex range of iconographies to explore collective and historical expressions of ongoing and displacement, while speaking to the times we live in. The exhibition, entitled Sodade,  opened on June 19 and continues until November 13, 2022.

‘Sodade’ is the title of a Cape Verdean song from 1950s, popularized by Cesária Évora, that narrates a profound emotional state of longing on ‘the long way’ to São Tomé. Originating in the Portuguese ‘saudade,’ the term signifies a feeling of melancholy and missing, and becomes hybridized in the Cape Verdean use with a shift in the spelling. In ‘Sodade,’ Johnson continues to draw from critical history and narratives around migration and journeys, with a similar gesture of hybridization.

Rashid Johnson
Surrender Paintings
Hauser & Wirth, Menorca

The exhibition presents a newly developed series of bronze sculptures and Seascape paintings, alongside Bruise Paintings and Surrender Paintings, the latter of which is the latest offering to evolve from the iconography of his long- established Anxious Men series. The works are accompanied by the Education Lab, which provides a creative learning program for diverse audiences throughout the duration of the exhibition.

Rashid Johnson
The New Black Yoga
film

Capturing both subjective and collective historical states in real time, the artist has pivoted the Anxious Red paintings iconography, which portrayed crowds of bright red faces, to Bruise Paintings and Surrender Paintings in hues of blues and whites. Johnson selects his typical materials and tools—such as shea butter and black soap—for the importance of their historical narratives. Here he has chosen to use the canonically significant, and universally recognizable, medium of oil paint in order to communicate his message all the more urgently.

Rashid Johnson
Bruise Paintings
Hauser & Wirth, Menorca

For the Bruise Paintings, Johnson has created the color Black&Blue in collaboration with R&F paints, which he layers and stretches across the canvas giving the impression of a wider range of colours from a single hue. The repetition and expressiveness of the blue figures bring mobility to the works, a nod to the importance of gesture in Johnson’s oeuvre. With a lyrical sense of melancholy, the Bruise Paintings speak to the times we live in and create a liminal space where healing has begun but the reminisce of trauma is still evident.

Rashid Johnson
 Hauser & Wirth Menorca

Continuing to pivot the Anxious Men iconography, Johnson applies Titanium White oil paint on raw linen in the series of Surrender Paintings, depicting ghostly faces to suggest acceptance and reconciliation. As the artist explains, ‘Emptied out of color, the Surrender Paintings feature white application only on raw linen canvases, conjuring a feeling of redemption and recognition. There’s a simplicity and quiet nature in how these new series relate to collective experiences of the last months.’

Rashid Johnson
Seascape paintings
Hauser & Wirth Menorca

The newly developed series of Seascape Paintings and boat sculptures draw from historical narratives of migration and journeys. The artist radically engages with the surface of the canvases with a process of removal similar to that of early works such as Cosmic Slops, in which Johnson carved marks into black soap and wax. For the Seascape Paintings, painted canvases are coated completely with Neutral White or Prussian Blue oil paint which Johnson wipes away and scratches with shapes reminiscent of individual row boats. The repetition of the motif and their scale suggest the possibility to escape, as well as of isolation, longing and drifting at sea.

A group of sculptures cast in bronze continue Johnson’s exploration of vessels and act as funerary pyres. Drawing from historical traditions from cultures across the globe in which the boat is a symbol of redemption and rebirth, the boats are cast from clay forms to which the artist has buried an array of objects of symbolic significance. VHS tapes, a CB radio, books and oyster shells are found in the carved sculptures, the latter referencing Zora Neale Hurston’s essay ‘How it Feels to be Colored Me.’ ‘I do not weep at the world, I am too busy sharpening my oyster knife,’ Hurston writes, ambiguously recalling the opulence of oyster eating and the aggressiveness of the knife.

In ‘Sodade,’ Rashid Johnson continues to incorporate diverse materials rich with symbolism and personal history, exploring collective narratives of longing and migration while providing a poignant sense of history now.

Rashid Johnson
Sodade
Seascape Paintings
Hauser & Wirth Menorca

ABOUT THE ARTIST: RASHID JOHNSON

Born in Chicago in 1977, Rashid Johnson is among an influential cadre of contemporary American artists whose work employs a wide range of media to explore themes of art history, individual and shared cultural identities, personal narratives, literature, philosophy, materiality, and critical history. After studying in the photography department of the Art Institute of Chicago, Johnson’s practice quickly expanded to embrace a wide range of media—including sculpture, painting, drawing, filmmaking, and installation—yielding a complex multidisciplinary practice that incorporates diverse materials rich with symbolism and personal history.

The LRFA blog finds Rashid Johnson’s work to be the perfect example of a Black artist creating of beautiful artworks that stand on their own qualitatively supported by the strongly principled political statements and symbolism of  a black artist coming into prominence in these times.

Rashid Johnson
Bruise Paintings
Hauser & Wirth, Menorca

RASHID JOHNSON IN MINORCA: A JOURNEY THROUGH MIGRATION, Longing and Togetherness

https://www.wallpaper.com/art/rashid-johnson-hauser-wirth-menorca

Boats have been populating Rashid Johnson’s view lately, particularly in the last two years, after the artist started spending more time on the Hamptons side of Long Island. Since then, boats have unearthed connotations beyond vehicles or charming visual accents on the shore. The epiphany coincided with a heightened sense of solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and with those struggling through the pandemic – unity, agency and co-existence, Johnson noticed, are notions contained both within his professional and personal circles and the likeness and purpose of a boat.

During those long, idyllic days spent looking at the horizon, he heard numerous expressions of togetherness and, all being somewhat true, he also pondered the meaning of being in the same boat. What was the direction? Or who were his fellow travellers? Johnson’s answers – or at least his searches for them – are a series of paintings and sculptures with boat motifs in his new show at Hauser & Wirth’s art center in Menorca. Proving that motivation works in mysterious ways, the Brooklyn-based artist made the show’s large-scale grid paintings, and four firepit sculptures encrusted with VHS tapes, a CB radio, book and oyster shells, while unaware of their intended venue. ‘When the opportunity to show them surrounded by water arose, it was clear that the works belonged to Menorca,’ he says.

Johnson’s East Williamsburg studio – which could well moonlight as a warehouse or a mini-factory – is occupied by a combination of works-in-progress and those waiting to dry. Standing amid canvases laid atop one another or leaned side by side, Johnson is dressed leisurely, in all black, on a breezy, slow-paced February afternoon, the kind of afternoon that deserves a chunky cookie, which he offers up.

Partly inherent to his aura, Johnson’s calmness also stems from his having bid farewell to the show’s artworks. They are already on a journey across the Atlantic Ocean, perhaps facing the ebbing sea towards the Strait of Gibraltar, through which they will cut for the tiny Spanish island. One can imagine Johnson’s impressions of boats, either nocturnal-hued repetitions over linen or firm formations in bronze, swaying back and forth against the diligent waves. Movement, however, is not always desirable. The history of the Atlantic is awash with forced migration, and Johnson’s show borrows its title, ‘Sodade’, from another piece of art that perfectly captures this reality. The namesake Cape Verdean song, famously uttered in Cesária Évora’s velvety voice, is an ode to the longing and fear of loss promised by the sea. The heart-aching lyrics pay tribute to Cape Verdeans, past and present, who have left the island in search of other opportunities: ‘Quem mostrava esse caminho longe? Quem mostrava esse caminho longe? Esse caminho pa São Tomé (Who showed you this distant way? Who showed you this distant way? This way to São Tomé)’. Written by Armando Zeferino Soares in the 1950s, these lines, in the Cape Verdean Creole version of Portuguese, express sodade, meaning longing.

Johnson’s encounter with the song is intertwined with a sense of melancholy and longing that has lingered over his last few years. When the artist shared his sentiments with a friend, they told him about a Portuguese word that somewhat sums up his state: saudade. One of those words that capture a very specific feeling that lacks a translation in another language, saudade expresses yearning for something so close yet undeniably distant. Johnson’s research into the expression reminded him of Évora’s song and the Cape Verdean Creole version of the word. ‘The Creole telling is about cultural formation through colonialism, but also how language gets deformed and reshaped in the hands of folks dominated by an outside presence,’ he adds. Johnson intentionally used the Creole spelling in his show’s title, to honour the struggle against oppression and resilience in the face of loss, in particular, loss tied to the sea.

Seascape painting
Rashid Johnson
Hauser & Wirth Menorca

Over the past two decades, Johnson’s practice, spanning painting, sculpture  installation and film, has explored notions of authorship, potential, empowerment and even entitlement. All correspond to a sense of agency. His paintings – thick, nearly sculptural and blanketed by grids of faces, or dressed in shards of mirror and mosaic – compel us to think, understand and express. Johnson believes that painting has the function of a soapbox or pedestal, a platform for the exchange of ideas. ‘The visual layer is an entry point for them to penetrate into work and be prompted, or even confused, by what’s beyond.’

More literally, the show’s boat sculptures are also functioning firepits, an invitation to convene, warm up and converse. ‘The vehicle has been so present in my work – language can be a vehicle for ideas, as can paint, aesthetics or mark-making,’ he says. In that sense, he likens a boat to a stage, the kind he built in Astor Place in downtown Manhattan last June, with non-profit arts organisation Creative Time. For a month, his Red Stage was activated by poets, dancers, musicians, thinkers, and anyone who had anything to say. He calls them pyres. ‘An open stage or a burning boat allows the audience to reflect on the ideas of autonomy and collectivity, especially when we are doing so much coalition-building around Black Lives Matter, the environment, and LGBTQIA movements.’

Johnson’s oeuvre, while unifying, does not compromise on subjective and singular experiences. Reflection, both internal and physical, is the key in his mixed-media mosaic and mirror paintings, which have the energy of abstract expressionism and the social heft of murals. Radiant, meticulous and poetic, the coalescence of shards ‘invites the viewers to piece the bits together and build their collective experience’. This subtle invitation to communion is a core element of the Anxious Men and Bruise Paintings series, characterised by determined hand gestures and infinite repetitions. Whether a face or an abstract circle, the army of motifs over linen multiply to hallucinatory masses, challenging the viewer to separate each figure from the next. The effort, however, is futile – better to surrender to Johnson’s orchestration of a painterly cosmos and plunge into the synthesis of brushstrokes in black and blue.

Rashid Johnson
Bruise Paintings
Hauser & Wirth, Menorca

Johnson’s colour palette stems from a dynamic between his cultural observations and the alchemy of oil paint. Blue is the fruit of his contemplation on the history of blues music, as well as many artists’ periods dedicated to the hue. ‘Oftentimes, I allow the colour to think about itself,’ he adds. Yellow, which he commonly renders in an alarming hue, is tied to his occasional use of shea butter in some of the sculptures. ‘There is a snowflakeness to mark-making because a gesture can never be repeated,’ he says. ‘But there is satisfaction in just trying to repeat yourself as a mantra.’ The democracy Johnson finds in the grid form – whether with faces, boats or circles – allows him to honour each gesture equally, ‘and aspires to give every section the same opportunity for amplification’, not unlike a voice to be heard or an arm raised.

Johnson builds his grids as a meditative act, rather than basing them on any numeric order. The facial impression in the Anxious Men series was initially intended as a self-portrait, but the feedback he received proved that the sentiment spoke to many. ‘That moment was satisfying, to recognise that this was an opportunity to think about the world as opposed to being trapped in my own existential conundrum.’ A mosaic interpretation of the series is now a mural at the Delta terminal at New York’s LaGuardia airport. Connecting with people in places where they don’t necessarily expect to experience art, he believes, is a promising endeavour: ‘You can traffic through it; you can engage or totally ignore, but regardless, art should have agency in these spaces.’


Fire Pits: bronze sculpture
Rashid Johnson
Hauser & Wirth, Menorca

The artist’s admiration for the architectural marvels of his hometown of Chicago, and his frustration with its segregated urbanisation, contribute to his understating of the impact and the role of an object within an environment. His philosophy of occupying a space is twofold: ‘I’ve been quite careful about not perverting the work when it travels, because my voice must travel along with the themes, concepts and ideas.’ Johnson visited Menorca and Barcelona six years ago, and found himself inspired by the mosaics of Gaudí and Miró. ‘That trip encouraged me to experiment with the medium,’ he remembers. While his mosaic paintings are not included in the ‘Sodade’ show, a similar reflection on formation and singularity constitutes the show’s Seascape, Surrender and Bruise Paintings series. The idea of people gathering around his boat sculptures is exciting. ‘So rarely do artworks have jobs,’ Johnson says. ‘But in the case of a firepit, there is the potential of heat, energy, and a place of activation.’

Airport, please! the LRFA blog heads to Norway, to Pierre Huyghe’s mysterious installation at Kistofos

Pierre Huyghe
Second Law
Kistefos, Norway
Pierre Huyghe, Second Law, 2021. Scanned forest, real-time simulation, generative mutations and sounds, intelligent camera, environmental sensors, animals, plants, micro-organisms and materialized mutations: synthetic and biological material aggregate © Pierre Huyghe. Courtesy of the artist; Hauser & Wirth, London; Kistefos. 3D

 

‘Second Law’ has emerged and will be on view at Kistefos museum this coming summer. ‘Second Law’ is an entity, a milieu, both physical and digital, permeable, continuously shaped by flood waters and modified by what it perceives. It is simultaneously an island and the possibility of what this island could be under alternate conditions of reality. As the world changes according to the mutations of covid, it is fascinating to follow this highly intelligent artist/scientist into a world of his creation. The LRFA blog flies to Oslo, Norway to the forest of Kistefos to see his predictions of our brave new world. Please join me.

The entire site has been scanned, down to its details, and digitized. In the simulated environment, unbound from physical limitations, algorithmic and biological agents intelligences cooperate. A fiction based set of rules is played out by learning machines that continually generate mutations of existing features, such as trees, trash, animals or humans. The mutations change behaviours in real time according to external factors, accelerating their growth with the flood water, and transforming over the years. At times they randomly exit the simulation to manifest themselves physically on the actual island. They sustain or decompose, modifying the island’s appearance and progressively contaminate the existing reality with another possibility of itself. At the far end of the forest stands a screen where an autonomous eye navigates the simulated environment, witnessing its ever-changing nature.

KISTEFOS , NORWAY

Kistefos is located one hour north-west of Oslo. There are two entrances to the park with parking on both sides. People with reduced mobility are asked to arrive from Entrance South.

 

 

PIERRE HUYGHE :  BIOLOGY AD ARCHAEOLOGY OUT OF TIME

Pierre Huyghe, De-extinction, , Film, 19 min, 2014

It is an aquarium. It is an artwork. It is an aquarium. It is an artwork. It is an aquarium inside an artwork. It is an artwork inside an artwork. It is a “creation” in the true sense of the word.

Pierre Huyghe’s aquariums in Hauser & Wirth (13 September – 1 November 2014, London) are live ecosystems enclosed by the artist in glass cubes. Huyghe has installed aquariums, among other places, at the Marian Goodman Gallery in New York in 2011 and more recently, in 2013, at the Centre Pompidou, Paris. Since 2005, he has been interested in biology and organism self-development, like in 2008, when he transformed, for a 24-hour period, the Sydney Opera House into a fog-filled arboretum, or in 2010, when he planted a calendar’s worth of flora in Madrid’s Crystal Palace for Reina Sofia, representing different seasons and holidays throughout the year and then letting them battle for ground rights. He stood out in dOCUMENTA XIII (Kassel, 2012), remarking his interest with “presence”, composing in a park an installation that included a real painted dog, a beehive-headed sculpture (with bees, of course), marijuana and poisonous fruits, left to their destiny without any control.

Pierre Huyghe Nympheas Transplant

The biotopes[1] of IN. BORDER. DEEP at Hauser & Wirth, despite their life-independence, have a narrative within. They have been, in fact, transplanted from Monet’s ponds in his garden in Giverny, the one represented in his famous “Nymphéas” paintings. Fabulously, Huyghe’s research went deep into the origin of his living organisms, so that the lighting sequence in the vitrines is programmed according to the variations of the weather in Giverny (speeded and alternated) during the shortest day in 1914, the autumn of 1917 and the entire period from 1914 and 1918, when Monet was there. The audience is witness of events suspended in time. Are the ecosystems mirrors of the past or are they developing in an uncertain future?

PIERRE HUYGHE AT THE MET

It’s always interesting to see how an artist’s ideas can fall flat in one medium but resound in another. Whether due to an uneven mastery of craft or to the particular nature of his efforts of late, French artist Pierre Huyghe is having just this kind of moment with two works recently on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Pierre Huyghe                       Untitled (human mask)

Huyghe has long investigated the ways in which nature and humanity both consort with and conspire against one another, and his latest projects — a video and a rooftop installation — are no exception. The difference is that one of these works is terrifically compelling, while the other isn’t in the slightest.

Huyghe shot his video Untitled (Human Mask) in Fukushima, Japan, in 2014, three years after a tsunami touched off the world’s largest nuclear meltdown since Chernobyl. The piece opens with images of the city’s gutted buildings and decimated streets, then quickly cuts to the quiet of an abandoned sake house where we observe a solitary monkey, masked, wigged, and dressed to look like a young girl. For nearly nineteen minutes, we watch the primate sitting, waiting, pacing the confined, creepy space, our eye continually redirected to the visual disruptions between animal body and human costume.

Huyghe isn’t rethinking audience pathos and the performing animal. This isn’t Bresson’s Au Hasard Balthazar — or even Hollywood’s Doctor Dolittle — but the work’s twisted achievement is the way in which it undermines the emotional expressiveness audiences typically project onto cine-creatures. The monkey’s expressionless white mask and prim uniform disconnect a viewer somewhat from the depressing spectacle of her domestication. Is she happy? Is she sad? Who can tell? Huyghe doesn’t seem at all interested in probing the depths of human barbarity in this case. Rather, his camera remains shortsighted, enamored only with the monkey’s uncanny presence.

If catastrophe teaches one lesson, it’s that time is never on our side. Although the moving image has always shadowboxed this inevitable blow, Huyghe unfortunately taps none of the power of video to develop his ideas and images via their duration. What Untitled (Human Mask) ultimately reveals is standard-issue art world trauma laundering — an act of apocalypse chic. He reduces the whole of the Fukushima disaster to a few short establishing shots, adrenalized by a twitchy editing style and a fashionably cacophonous soundtrack: a soupçon of atrocity tourism to whet a viewer’s palate with the illusion of gravitas

Pierre Huyghe at the Met
Installation, February 11,2022

By contrast, Huyghe’s smart, subtle installation on the Met’s rooftop garden is nothing if not alert to time as the great coconspirator. Here he plays at excavating the primal landscape of the island of Manhattan, removing certain of the Met’s heavy granite roof tiles to create miniature topographies of native stones, thin streams of water, and sprouts of indigenous plants. A sizable piece of schist sits at one end of the roof, while a chunk of lava floats in an aquarium at the other. Swimming inside the tank are a lamprey eel and a few tadpole shrimp, ancient creatures unchanged by evolution’s push forward.

The tank drips into the artist’s manmade landscapes, watering the flora that’s doomed to be pulled sooner or later from its temporary place. Artificial ecosystems always manage to serve as unsettling metaphors for “growth to nowhere,” and this may be Huyghe’s sharpest move of all.

Look up and west from the museum’s roof to gaze over the treetops of Central Park. To the east you’ll see a grand apartment building encased in scaffolding, its restoration under way. To the south, behold the gross overgrowth of the midtown skyline, now dominated by 432 Park Avenue, a Kafkaesque malignancy that promises New Yorkers “the grand experience of estate living — in the sky.” For the moment it’s the tallest building in the neighborhood, but will soon be bested by two others concurrently going up along the same corridor.

This too, you may remind yourself as you look from Huyghe’s weird and witty return to Eden, is all just future rubble.

Met installation
Pierre Huyghe

https://www.villagevoice.com/2015/08/18/the-met-doubles-down-on-pierre-huyghe/

https://observer.com/2015/05/pierre-huyghe-on-why-he-chose-to-dig-up-the-mets-roof-garden/

As we create new worlds, new habits and new ecosystems, post-pandemic, Pierre Huyghe’s haunting installations open the door to a multitude of possibilities.

Airport, please! LRFA heads to Oudolf Field at Hauser & Wirth Somerset

 

Hauser & Wirth Somerset

‘For me, garden design isn’t just about plants, it is about emotion, atmosphere, a sense of contemplation. You try to move people with what you do. You look at this, and it goes deeper than what you see. It reminds you of something in the genes — nature, or the longing for nature.’ s—Piet Oudolf –

Installation view
Wilder than wildness itself
Hauser & Wirth, Somerset

Five acclaimed artist-makers have originated new multidisciplinary works in response to Oudolf Field, a 1.5-acre perennial meadow designed by Piet Oudolf at Hauser & Wirth Somerset. During a time of claustrophic social distancing and staying at home, visions of Somerset danced in our heads The fresh air to breathe, the green rolling hills, and now the LRFA blog is thrilled to have an opportunity to visit the extraordinary space created and developed by Hauser and Wirth in Somerset, England.

A living canvas, the garden passes from the vigour of the growing season to the poignancy of decay. In summer Oudolf Field embraces movement and energy, each plant, grass and flowerhead alive with their own gravity and tension. In winter texture and tone form abstract compositions. The works presented evoke the immersive experience of the garden, drawing upon Oudolf’s philosophy that rather than copying nature, the intention is to create a feeling, deepening our connection with its seasons and cycles. ‘Wilder than Wildness itself’ explores the duality of the ephemeral and the permanent. Deeply personal works in resin, glass, textile and clay reflect a unique visual aesthetic, the progression of time, the passage of life and perceptions of beauty.

http://hauser and wirth somerset piet oudolf

installation view
Wilder than wildness itself
Hauser & Wirth, Somerset

OUDOLF

Oudolf is a leading figure in the New Perennial movement; his projects are characterized by a strong pictorial relationship to a garden’s composition and layout. Inspired by art, nature and time, Oudolf’s gardens are achieved through areas of naturalistic planting, using swathes of perennials and grasses combined with structured pathways, shrubs and trees.
An internationally-renowned landscape designer, Oudolf was born in 1944 in Haarlem, Netherlands. Since 1982, he has lived and worked in Hummelo, a tiny village in east Netherlands, where he started a nursery with his wife Anja, to grow perennials. His garden has since become renowned for its radical approach and ideas about planting design. Oudolf has received many high profile commissions around the world, including for The High Line, New York, in a collaboration with landscape architect James Corner, and ‘Hortus Conclusus’ with Peter Zumthor at Serpentine Gallery, London.

Installation view
Wilder than Wildness itself
Hauser & Wirth, Somerset

 

HAUSER & WIRTH, SOMERSET

Hauser & Wirth Somerset supports an immersive artist-in-residence program, encouraging artists to benefit from the idyllic surroundings and to integrate with the local community.

On-site restaurant, Roth Bar & Grill, serves seasonal, locally sourced produce, and is replete with works of art including a site-specific bar created by Björn and Oddur Roth, the son and grandson of artist Dieter Roth.

The centre is located on the outskirts of Bruton, on Durslade Farm, which is a working free-range farm, providing produce for Roth Bar & Grill. The gallery opened in 2014 – prior to this the buildings had remained derelict for several decades, until they were sensitively restored and new buildings added by Paris based architectural firm Laplace. Durslade Farmhouse, the original six-bedroom farmhouse, also renovated by Laplace, is available to rent for short stays.

Hauser & Wirth Somerset has been awarded a RIBA South West Award 2015, a Civic Trust 2015 Award, and in 2014 it was the winner of the William Stansell Historic Buildings Award, for Durslade Farmhouse. In 2015 it ran its own competition for young architects, titled The Shed Project.

Installation view
Wilder than Wildness itself
Hauser & Wirth, Somerset

Heading to Hauser & Wirth’s new gallery, in Monaco, with Airport, please!

Louise Bourgeois
Spider in Monaco

Over a nearly 30-year history, Hauser & Wirth has created physical spaces in locations where their artists and collectors reside—of course in the large urban cities of London, New York, and Los Angeles but also in legendary resort communities and seasonal gathering spots such as Southampton and St. Moritz. In July 2021, Hauser & Wirth will also open an extraordinary center for the arts on King’s Island, in the port of Mahon in Menorca. The artists and estates represented by the gallery has always been  its driving force for expanding in the areas of art, education, conservation and sustainable development. The impact of the events of the last year and one-half have acted as a compelling catalyst to accelerate Hauser & Wirth, and every major network of galleries, auction houses, and art fairs, in developing new and innovative, often technologically based, ways to present and sell works of art.

https://www.hauserwirth.com/

Hauser & Wirth
Gallery Interior
Monaco

On June 19th, located in the heart of Monaco, near the historic Hôtel de Paris, Hauser & Wirth’s latest gallery features a spectacular main exhibition space, an impressive 350 square yards cube with 30 foot high walls, lit by a dramatic skylight. The conversion of the site has been conducted by Selldorf Architects, New York, which has collaborated with Hauser & Wirth on its spaces internationally since the founding of the gallery in 1992. In Monaco, Hauser & Wirth occupies the lower spaces of a building designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and owned by the Société des Bains de Mer.

https://www.hauserwirth.com/news/32176-hauser-wirth-monaco-opens-inaugural-exhibition-louise-bourgeois

The inaugural exhibition ‘Louise Bourgeois. Maladie de l’Amour’ (Love Sickness although it sounds so much better in French!) runs from  June 19th until September 26th, 2021. A monumental public sculpture from the French American artist’s Spider series, a bronze arachnid over three meters tall, will be installed in the gardens adjacent to the gallery.

One Monte-Carlo
Gallery facade
Monaco

‘When we were invited to play a part in the continuing revival of the art scene in Monaco,’ says Iwan Wirth, President, Hauser & Wirth, ‘we saw that it offered an exceptional opportunity to present our artists in the heart of city, engaging with the vibrant contemporary scene across the south of France, strengthening our European presence. In former times, Monaco was a destination for artists, writers, and filmmakers who were as captivated as we have been by the Côte d’Azur.

Louise Bourgeois
Hauser & Wirth Monaco

INAUGURAL EXHIBITION, HAUSER & WIRTH, MONACO: LOUISE BOURGEOIS

The works in the inaugural exhibition by Louise Bourgeois span a period between 1947-2008 and draw on recurring themes of anxiety and longing, emotions which the artist repeatedly evoked to create her personal visual vocabulary. Along with Bourgeois’ monumental Spider sculpture dating from 1996, one of the artist’s most enduring and iconic motifs, two further aluminium sculptures are suspended inside the gallery. ‘Untitled’ (2004) gently rotates, as a continuously morphing form. The abstract spiral belongs to an important series Bourgeois made during the 1990s and shares a particular affinity to a previous work entitled ‘Les Bienvenus’ (1996), commissioned by the French Government and installed in the Parc de la Mairie in the village of Choisy-le-Roi, France, where she grew up.

Louise Bourgeois

LOUISE BOURGEOIS

Bourgeois’s work is inextricably entwined with her life and experiences. ‘Art,’ as she once remarked in an interview, ‘is the experience, the re-experience of a trauma.’  Employing motifs, dramatic colors, dense skeins of thread, and a vast diversity of media, Bourgeois’s distinctive symbolic code enmeshes the complexities of the human experience and individual introspection.

Rather than pursuing formalist concerns for their own sake, Bourgeois endeavored to find the most appropriate means of expressing her ideas and emotions, combining a wide range of materials – variously, fabric, plaster, latex, marble and bronze – with an endless repertoire of found objects. Although her work covers the range of painting, drawing, printmaking, and performance, Bourgeois remains best known for her sculpture.

 

Bourgeois’s work was included in the seminal exhibition ‘Eccentric Abstraction,’ curated by Lucy Lippard for New York’s Fischbach Gallery in 1966. Major breakthroughs on the international scene followed with The Museum of Modern Art in New York’s 1982 retrospective of her work; Bourgeois’s participation in Documenta IX in 1992; and her representation of the United States at the 45th Venice Biennale in 1993. In 2001, Bourgeois was the first artist commissioned to fill the Tate Modern’s cavernous Turbine Hall. The Tate Modern’s 2007 retrospective of her works, which subsequently traveled to the Centre Pompidou in Paris; The Guggenheim Museum in New York; The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles; and The Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden in Washington D.C., cemented her legacy as a foremost artist of late Modernism.

 

In response to the isolation and distancing of the pandemic, many of the major galleries have successfully opened branches in luxurious resort areas, Palm Beach and the Hamptons, on the East Coast. The debut of a new Hauser & Wirth gallery on the Cote d’Azur is a seductive destination and supports Monaco’s efforts to establish an active art scene with Monaco Art Week and the Monte-Carlo fair.

See for yourself! Airport, please!

The Verbier Art Summit: Innovation and Change with Madeleine Paternot, co-founder of Verbier’s 3-D Sculpture Park

Art Geneve 2019
Geneva, Switzerland
January 31 – February 3

FROM JANUARY 31st TO FEBRUARY 3, 2019, ART GENEVA’S SALONS DES ARTS IS HOLDING THE 8th EDITION OF ITS MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART FAIR. OVER THE COURSE OF 7 YEARS, ARTGENEVE HAS ESTABLISHED ITSELF AS AN INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED CONTEMPORARY AND MODERN ART FAIR. THIS YEAR, IT WILL GAIN IN EVER-INCREASING POPULARITY BY THE ADDITION OF DECORATIVE ARTS, HISTORIC AND CONTEMPORARY DESIGN AND TRIBAL ART, AND FEATURE PAD (THE PAVILION OF ART AND DESIGN FAIR THAT IS SO WELL ATTENDED IN PARIS AND LONDON).

Art Geneve
Palexpo, Geneva
January 31 – February 2nd, 2019

PACE GALLERY IS OPENING A NEW SPACE IN GENEVA IN MARCH AND IS PARTICIPATING FOR THE FIRST TIME IN ARTGENEVE. THE GALLERY, LOCATED IN THE CENTER OF THE CITY AT THE QUAI DES BERGES 15-17, PROVIDES PACE A PLATFORM TO FURTHER STRENGTHEN ITS ENGAGEMENT WITH THE REGION’S CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS, COLLECTORS AND PUBLIC.

TO QUOTE MARC GLIMCHER, PACE’S PRESIDENT AND CEO:

“As the art world grows increasingly global, embracing new commercial centers and strengthening relationships with communities of collectors around the world are key elements of our mission to advance the international engagement with our artists’ work.”

HAUSER AND WIRTH RECENTLY ADDED YET ANOTHER GALLERY TO ITS INTERNATIONAL EMPIRE, ITS THIRD IN SWITZERLAND, WITH A NEW SPACE IN ST. MORITZ, . THE SWISS DEALERS HAVE RETURNED TO THEIR ROOTS, OPENING LAST DECEMBER WITH AN EXHIBITION OF WORK BY LOUISE BOURGEOIS.

ON A YOUNGER NOTE, VITO SCHNABEL GALLERY WAS FOUNDED IN ST. MORITZ IN 2015 AND CURRENTLY FEATURES AN EXCEPTIONAL EXHIBITION, THE AGE OF AMBIGUITY, CURATED BY BOB COLACELLO, WITH A DIVERSE RANGE OF ARTISTS SUCH AS RASHID JOHNSON, JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT, JAQUELINE HUMPHRIES, AND ANDY WARHOL.

Vito Schnabel Gallery
St. Moritz

GAGOSIAN HAS HAD ITS FEET FIRMLY PLANTED IN SWISS SOIL SINCE 2010, OPENING AT THAT TIME WITH A STUNNING INAUGURAL EXHIBITION, “GIACOMETTI IN SWITZERLAND”, CURATED BY THE GIACOMETTI FOUNDATION AND BY ANNETTE GIACOMETTI, AND IS CURRENTLY EXHIBITING OUR SARDONIC KITSCH AMERICAN PAINTER, JOHN CURRIN.

Verbier Art Summit 2019
February 1 – 2

SWITZERLAND IS BURSTING WITH CONTEMPORARY ART AND IDEAS IN EARLY FEBRUARY AND TODAY’S LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO HAVE  MADELEINE PATERNOT, CO-FOUNDER OF VERBIER’S 3-D FOUNDATION AND SCULPTURE PARK, SHARE THE DETAILS OF THE EVENTS TAKING PLACE AT THE VERBIER ART SUMMIT.

Verbier Art Summit

MADDY, WELCOME BACK. PLEASE TELL US ABOUT JAMES CAPPER’S WORK AND WHY HE WAS CHOSEN AT THE 2018 ARTIST IN RESIDENCE.

Capper’s work AERO CAB creates a modern platform for visitors to consider the role of the engineer in relation to creating solutions in fragile natural environments in places such as Verbier, and to the possibilities of broadening the scope from the technical aspects of engineering to those aspects that directly affect communities and the environment.  Capper, an artistic engineer, was invited to Verbier, Switzerland to become immersed in the local glacial environment to develop new work responding to the 200th year anniversary of the Giétro Glacier and its catastrophe of 1818.

In 1815,  ‘Year Without Summer’, marked the beginning of a three-year period of severe climate deterioration of global scale, unforeseen chaotic and chilling weather caused many glaciers in Switzerland to increase in mass. The Giétro Glacier therefore advanced and loomed over the valley. This caused alarm of the threat of falling ice, avalanches and the possibility of the ice dam that had formed, bursting. The Giétro Catastrophe is one of the most famous and most disastrous historical events in the Swiss Alps related to climate change. Its folklore is embedded in the local history of the surrounding areas and recently resurrected due to this year’s anniversary fused with current debates on effects of the present-day period of amplified global warming – the Anthropocene.

James Capper
Artist in Residence 2018
Verbier 3-D Foundation

The Verbier Art Summit is an international platform for discourse connecting thought leaders to key figures in the art world to generate innovative ideas and drive social cahnge. This year, our 3-D Foundation offers test runs of AERO CAB with artist James Capper. 

Verbier 3-D Foundation Art Summit Events:

Friday 1st February :
13h – 14h: Art Walk in the snow through the Verbier 3-D Sculpture Park with artist James Capper and 3-D curator Alexa Jeanne Kusber

James Capper’s AERO CAB Test Runs at the Verbier Art Summit

As part of our continued cultural partnership in 2019 with the Verbier Art Summit, we would like to invite you to experience an afternoon of experimental sculptural demonstrations (test runs) of AERO CAB with the artist that will take place on 2 Feb and 3 Feb 2019.

Saturday 2nd February :
13h – 14h: Test run of AERO CAB with artist James Capper

Sunday 3rd February :
13h – 14h: Test run of AERO CAB with artist James Capper

 

The Verbier 3-D Foundation is pleased present, AERO CAB a new sculptural work by British artist  James Capper which is currently on exhibit at an altitude of 2,300 meters in the Verbier 3-D Sculpture Park. The artistic engineer was invited to participate in our 2018 Artist Residency to become immersed in the local glacial environment to develop new work in response to current debates on climate change.

James Capper’s sculptural machines have specific, functional uses, but the tangible impact they have on the environment also engages with essential questions concerning the relationship between the natural world, art and technology. The application of hydraulic engineering ensures each work has the capability of landmarking or sculpting when operated, however, the experimentation and refinement deployed transcends componentry and purpose, rendering them as works of art.

This all comes together when Capper operates his creations in person, as the testing of his work is a crucial part of the artist’s practice – the outcome never specifically predetermined. Once the behaviour of AERO CAB is identified during these test runs, Capper will continue to develop the work through the medium of film.

Visitors are also invited on 1 February for a curator-led walk through of Verbier 3-D Sculpture Park with Verbier 3-D’s Chief Curator Alexa Jeanne Kusber and artist James Capper.

Alexa Jeanne Kusber is an American independent curator and creative based in Zurich. Throughout her career, she has maintained a focus on questioning and expanding the notion of curating.

She co-curates the Residency Programme with British curator Paul Goodwin at the Verbier 3-D Foundation, creating a space for artists and experimentation to meet in an alternative context in which the artists’ practices are challenged to create cutting-edge contemporary art in relation to place.

Furthermore, we are excited to be included in the VIP programming for Art Geneva for the AERO CAB event on 2 February.

James Capper
Aero Cab

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, WE RETURN TO PRIVATE VIEW NY, MADDY’S MOST RECENT UNDERTAKING, ITS LINKS WITH THE VERBIER ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM AND SOME WONDERFUL PAST AND CURRENT EXHIBITIONS.

PLEASE JOIN US!

Kate Abrams, Director at Hauser & Wirth, documents her early commitment to first-tier art

Katharine Abrams
Associate Director
Hauser & Wirth

HAUSER & WIRTH IS AN INTERNATIONAL GALLERY DEVOTED TO CONTEMPORARY AND MODERN ART FOUNDED IN ZURICH IN 1992 BY IWAN AND MANUELA WIRTH AND URSULA HAUSER. SINCE THAT TIME, THE GALLERY HAS EXPANDED EXPONENTIALLY TO ACCOMMODATE THE INNOVATIVE, RADICAL AND LARGE-SCALED WORKS PRODUCED BY MANY OF THE GALLERY ARTISTS. THE VENUES ARE BROAD IN SCOPE AND EACH SPACE UNIQUE IN FORM AND FUNCTION: AN EXCEPTIONAL SPACE ON LONDON’S SAVILE ROW, THE FORMER DIA FOUNDATION ON 22nd STREET IN NEW YORK’S CHELSEA, A CHIC TOWNHOUSE DESIGNED BY ANNABELLE SELLDORF ON THE UPPER EAST SIDE, A UNIQUE GALLERY AND MULTI-PURPOSE ARTS CENTER IN SOMERSET, ENGLAND, AND MOST RECENTLY, HAUSER & WIRTH OPENED A PHENOMENAL SPACE IN THE BURGEONING DOWNTOWN ARTS DISTRICT OF LOS ANGELES.

The Peggy Guggenheim Museum
Venice, Italy

TODAY, THE GALLERY IS A GLOBAL ENTERPRISE THAT HAS A TRADITIONAL VALUE SYSTEM OF SUPPORTING ITS ARTISTS AND ARTIST ESTATES  BY PROVIDING REMARKABLE EXHIBITION SPACES AND THE SCHOLARSHIP, CATALOGUES, PUBLIC PROGRAMS AND EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES THAT SERVE TO CONTEXTUALIZE THE ART ON VIEW.

IT IS PLEASURE TO INTRODUCE MY FRIEND AND COLLEAGUE, KATHARINE ABRAMS, DIRECTOR AT HAUSER & WIRTH, TO THE LRFA BLOG. KATE’S PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE INCLUDES POSITIONS AT TWO HIGHLY RESPECTED GALLERIES, BARBARA GLADSTONE AND MARIAN GOODMAN, AND HER CAREER PATH HAS BEEN FOCUSED AND DIRECT.

The Saatchi Gallery
Iconoclasts: Art Out of the Mainstream

KATE, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR TAKING THE TIME TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE LRFA BLOG!

WHERE IS HOME? DID YOU GROW UP IN NEW YORK OR COME TO THE CITY TO ATTEND SCHOOL?

New York is home now, but I grew up in Los Angeles. I came to New York in 2006 to attend Columbia University. And then I stayed.

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST INTRODUCTION TO MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART AND HOW DID IT LEAD YOU TO PURSUING A GALLERY CAREER?

My parents have always been interested in art and I grew up going to museums. But I think the first time it really resonated with me was when I was 13 and we went to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice. I was totally transfixed. I also vividly remember visiting the Saatchi Gallery and the Tate in London when I was 16. Venice piqued my interest and then London solidified it.

The gallery career came about organically after college. I needed a job and I happened to get one at a gallery. At that time I was also open to non-profits and institutions as well. But I’m glad it happened the way it did.

Judd Foundation
Spring Street, New York

WHAT ARTISTS FIRST CAUGHT YOUR ATTENTION AND WHY?

I was always very interested in Minimalism, both aesthetically and intellectually. Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, Carl Andre, Robert Morris – the greats. I was lucky to study closely with Branden Joseph, who came to Columbia the same year I did. First I took a lecture course on Minimalism and Post-Minimalism, and the following year I took a travel seminar where we went to Houston to see the Menil Collection and then to Marfa to see the Judd Foundation and Chinati. That trip was really important to me. I came back and immediately got an internship at the Judd Foundation on Spring Street.  

The Donald Judd Foundation
Chinati
Marfa, Texas

YOU MAJORED IN ART HISTORY AT COLUMBIA AND WROTE YOUR SENIOR THESIS ON ONE OF MY ABSOLUTE FAVORITE ARTISTS, JAMES TURRELL. WHTAT PROMPTED THAT CHOICE AND WHAT ARE THE ELEMENTS IN HIS WORK THAT RESONATE THE MOST STRONGLY?

After I got back from Marfa, I couldn’t stop thinking about the quality of the light there. The way the light interacts with Judd’s sculptures at Chinati – he purchased all the land surrounding the installation so that nothing would interrupt that. I started to be interested in the phenomenology of perception and light as a medium. A lot of people are familiar with Turrell’s projection pieces and skyspaces, but not as much about his earliest work in his studio in Venice, CA. He created a 10-hour performative piece called the ‘Mendota Stoppages’ using small apertures in the windows directed towards natural or artificial lights outside. The viewer would gradually adjust to the changing qualities of light in the space over time.

James Turrell
Mendota Stoppages

 

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, KATE ABRAMS WILL SHARE HER EARLY PROFESSIONAL PATH, FROM ONE GREAT GALLERY TO THE NEXT. WE ARE FORTUNATE TO HAVE SUCH A DEDICATED ART LOVER AND GALLERIST WITH US. PLEASE FEEL FREE TO ASK ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE.