Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

INTERNATIONAL ART ADVISORY SERVICE

Tag: installation

Airport, please! the LRFA blog heads to Norway, to Pierre Huyghe’s mysterious installation at Kistofos

Pierre Huyghe
Second Law
Kistefos, Norway
Pierre Huyghe, Second Law, 2021. Scanned forest, real-time simulation, generative mutations and sounds, intelligent camera, environmental sensors, animals, plants, micro-organisms and materialized mutations: synthetic and biological material aggregate © Pierre Huyghe. Courtesy of the artist; Hauser & Wirth, London; Kistefos. 3D

 

‘Second Law’ has emerged and will be on view at Kistefos museum this coming summer. ‘Second Law’ is an entity, a milieu, both physical and digital, permeable, continuously shaped by flood waters and modified by what it perceives. It is simultaneously an island and the possibility of what this island could be under alternate conditions of reality. As the world changes according to the mutations of covid, it is fascinating to follow this highly intelligent artist/scientist into a world of his creation. The LRFA blog flies to Oslo, Norway to the forest of Kistefos to see his predictions of our brave new world. Please join me.

The entire site has been scanned, down to its details, and digitized. In the simulated environment, unbound from physical limitations, algorithmic and biological agents intelligences cooperate. A fiction based set of rules is played out by learning machines that continually generate mutations of existing features, such as trees, trash, animals or humans. The mutations change behaviours in real time according to external factors, accelerating their growth with the flood water, and transforming over the years. At times they randomly exit the simulation to manifest themselves physically on the actual island. They sustain or decompose, modifying the island’s appearance and progressively contaminate the existing reality with another possibility of itself. At the far end of the forest stands a screen where an autonomous eye navigates the simulated environment, witnessing its ever-changing nature.

KISTEFOS , NORWAY

Kistefos is located one hour north-west of Oslo. There are two entrances to the park with parking on both sides. People with reduced mobility are asked to arrive from Entrance South.

 

 

PIERRE HUYGHE :  BIOLOGY AD ARCHAEOLOGY OUT OF TIME

Pierre Huyghe, De-extinction, , Film, 19 min, 2014

It is an aquarium. It is an artwork. It is an aquarium. It is an artwork. It is an aquarium inside an artwork. It is an artwork inside an artwork. It is a “creation” in the true sense of the word.

Pierre Huyghe’s aquariums in Hauser & Wirth (13 September – 1 November 2014, London) are live ecosystems enclosed by the artist in glass cubes. Huyghe has installed aquariums, among other places, at the Marian Goodman Gallery in New York in 2011 and more recently, in 2013, at the Centre Pompidou, Paris. Since 2005, he has been interested in biology and organism self-development, like in 2008, when he transformed, for a 24-hour period, the Sydney Opera House into a fog-filled arboretum, or in 2010, when he planted a calendar’s worth of flora in Madrid’s Crystal Palace for Reina Sofia, representing different seasons and holidays throughout the year and then letting them battle for ground rights. He stood out in dOCUMENTA XIII (Kassel, 2012), remarking his interest with “presence”, composing in a park an installation that included a real painted dog, a beehive-headed sculpture (with bees, of course), marijuana and poisonous fruits, left to their destiny without any control.

Pierre Huyghe Nympheas Transplant

The biotopes[1] of IN. BORDER. DEEP at Hauser & Wirth, despite their life-independence, have a narrative within. They have been, in fact, transplanted from Monet’s ponds in his garden in Giverny, the one represented in his famous “Nymphéas” paintings. Fabulously, Huyghe’s research went deep into the origin of his living organisms, so that the lighting sequence in the vitrines is programmed according to the variations of the weather in Giverny (speeded and alternated) during the shortest day in 1914, the autumn of 1917 and the entire period from 1914 and 1918, when Monet was there. The audience is witness of events suspended in time. Are the ecosystems mirrors of the past or are they developing in an uncertain future?

PIERRE HUYGHE AT THE MET

It’s always interesting to see how an artist’s ideas can fall flat in one medium but resound in another. Whether due to an uneven mastery of craft or to the particular nature of his efforts of late, French artist Pierre Huyghe is having just this kind of moment with two works recently on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Pierre Huyghe                       Untitled (human mask)

Huyghe has long investigated the ways in which nature and humanity both consort with and conspire against one another, and his latest projects — a video and a rooftop installation — are no exception. The difference is that one of these works is terrifically compelling, while the other isn’t in the slightest.

Huyghe shot his video Untitled (Human Mask) in Fukushima, Japan, in 2014, three years after a tsunami touched off the world’s largest nuclear meltdown since Chernobyl. The piece opens with images of the city’s gutted buildings and decimated streets, then quickly cuts to the quiet of an abandoned sake house where we observe a solitary monkey, masked, wigged, and dressed to look like a young girl. For nearly nineteen minutes, we watch the primate sitting, waiting, pacing the confined, creepy space, our eye continually redirected to the visual disruptions between animal body and human costume.

Huyghe isn’t rethinking audience pathos and the performing animal. This isn’t Bresson’s Au Hasard Balthazar — or even Hollywood’s Doctor Dolittle — but the work’s twisted achievement is the way in which it undermines the emotional expressiveness audiences typically project onto cine-creatures. The monkey’s expressionless white mask and prim uniform disconnect a viewer somewhat from the depressing spectacle of her domestication. Is she happy? Is she sad? Who can tell? Huyghe doesn’t seem at all interested in probing the depths of human barbarity in this case. Rather, his camera remains shortsighted, enamored only with the monkey’s uncanny presence.

If catastrophe teaches one lesson, it’s that time is never on our side. Although the moving image has always shadowboxed this inevitable blow, Huyghe unfortunately taps none of the power of video to develop his ideas and images via their duration. What Untitled (Human Mask) ultimately reveals is standard-issue art world trauma laundering — an act of apocalypse chic. He reduces the whole of the Fukushima disaster to a few short establishing shots, adrenalized by a twitchy editing style and a fashionably cacophonous soundtrack: a soupçon of atrocity tourism to whet a viewer’s palate with the illusion of gravitas

Pierre Huyghe at the Met
Installation, February 11,2022

By contrast, Huyghe’s smart, subtle installation on the Met’s rooftop garden is nothing if not alert to time as the great coconspirator. Here he plays at excavating the primal landscape of the island of Manhattan, removing certain of the Met’s heavy granite roof tiles to create miniature topographies of native stones, thin streams of water, and sprouts of indigenous plants. A sizable piece of schist sits at one end of the roof, while a chunk of lava floats in an aquarium at the other. Swimming inside the tank are a lamprey eel and a few tadpole shrimp, ancient creatures unchanged by evolution’s push forward.

The tank drips into the artist’s manmade landscapes, watering the flora that’s doomed to be pulled sooner or later from its temporary place. Artificial ecosystems always manage to serve as unsettling metaphors for “growth to nowhere,” and this may be Huyghe’s sharpest move of all.

Look up and west from the museum’s roof to gaze over the treetops of Central Park. To the east you’ll see a grand apartment building encased in scaffolding, its restoration under way. To the south, behold the gross overgrowth of the midtown skyline, now dominated by 432 Park Avenue, a Kafkaesque malignancy that promises New Yorkers “the grand experience of estate living — in the sky.” For the moment it’s the tallest building in the neighborhood, but will soon be bested by two others concurrently going up along the same corridor.

This too, you may remind yourself as you look from Huyghe’s weird and witty return to Eden, is all just future rubble.

Met installation
Pierre Huyghe

https://www.villagevoice.com/2015/08/18/the-met-doubles-down-on-pierre-huyghe/

https://observer.com/2015/05/pierre-huyghe-on-why-he-chose-to-dig-up-the-mets-roof-garden/

As we create new worlds, new habits and new ecosystems, post-pandemic, Pierre Huyghe’s haunting installations open the door to a multitude of possibilities.

Airport, please! LRFA heads to Oudolf Field at Hauser & Wirth Somerset

 

Hauser & Wirth Somerset

‘For me, garden design isn’t just about plants, it is about emotion, atmosphere, a sense of contemplation. You try to move people with what you do. You look at this, and it goes deeper than what you see. It reminds you of something in the genes — nature, or the longing for nature.’ s—Piet Oudolf –

Installation view
Wilder than wildness itself
Hauser & Wirth, Somerset

Five acclaimed artist-makers have originated new multidisciplinary works in response to Oudolf Field, a 1.5-acre perennial meadow designed by Piet Oudolf at Hauser & Wirth Somerset. During a time of claustrophic social distancing and staying at home, visions of Somerset danced in our heads The fresh air to breathe, the green rolling hills, and now the LRFA blog is thrilled to have an opportunity to visit the extraordinary space created and developed by Hauser and Wirth in Somerset, England.

A living canvas, the garden passes from the vigour of the growing season to the poignancy of decay. In summer Oudolf Field embraces movement and energy, each plant, grass and flowerhead alive with their own gravity and tension. In winter texture and tone form abstract compositions. The works presented evoke the immersive experience of the garden, drawing upon Oudolf’s philosophy that rather than copying nature, the intention is to create a feeling, deepening our connection with its seasons and cycles. ‘Wilder than Wildness itself’ explores the duality of the ephemeral and the permanent. Deeply personal works in resin, glass, textile and clay reflect a unique visual aesthetic, the progression of time, the passage of life and perceptions of beauty.

http://hauser and wirth somerset piet oudolf

installation view
Wilder than wildness itself
Hauser & Wirth, Somerset

OUDOLF

Oudolf is a leading figure in the New Perennial movement; his projects are characterized by a strong pictorial relationship to a garden’s composition and layout. Inspired by art, nature and time, Oudolf’s gardens are achieved through areas of naturalistic planting, using swathes of perennials and grasses combined with structured pathways, shrubs and trees.
An internationally-renowned landscape designer, Oudolf was born in 1944 in Haarlem, Netherlands. Since 1982, he has lived and worked in Hummelo, a tiny village in east Netherlands, where he started a nursery with his wife Anja, to grow perennials. His garden has since become renowned for its radical approach and ideas about planting design. Oudolf has received many high profile commissions around the world, including for The High Line, New York, in a collaboration with landscape architect James Corner, and ‘Hortus Conclusus’ with Peter Zumthor at Serpentine Gallery, London.

Installation view
Wilder than Wildness itself
Hauser & Wirth, Somerset

 

HAUSER & WIRTH, SOMERSET

Hauser & Wirth Somerset supports an immersive artist-in-residence program, encouraging artists to benefit from the idyllic surroundings and to integrate with the local community.

On-site restaurant, Roth Bar & Grill, serves seasonal, locally sourced produce, and is replete with works of art including a site-specific bar created by Björn and Oddur Roth, the son and grandson of artist Dieter Roth.

The centre is located on the outskirts of Bruton, on Durslade Farm, which is a working free-range farm, providing produce for Roth Bar & Grill. The gallery opened in 2014 – prior to this the buildings had remained derelict for several decades, until they were sensitively restored and new buildings added by Paris based architectural firm Laplace. Durslade Farmhouse, the original six-bedroom farmhouse, also renovated by Laplace, is available to rent for short stays.

Hauser & Wirth Somerset has been awarded a RIBA South West Award 2015, a Civic Trust 2015 Award, and in 2014 it was the winner of the William Stansell Historic Buildings Award, for Durslade Farmhouse. In 2015 it ran its own competition for young architects, titled The Shed Project.

Installation view
Wilder than Wildness itself
Hauser & Wirth, Somerset

Airport, please! Staying local, visiting Miami’s Team Lab Superblue

Superblue
Miami, Florida
Es Dezeen

Superblue is a groundbreaking enterprise dedicated to producing, presenting and engaging audiences with experiential art. One of the best results of the isolation of the pandemic has been the extraordinary strides in technology that the art world has incorporated. Previously content to focus on showing and seeing works of art in person, the art world was one of the last industry’s to allow the digital world to take priority over the physical one. Covid-19 has changed all that.  Art fairs went OVR, the mega-galleries and auction houses invested significant sums in developing new innovative technologically-oriented ways to expose art to collectors and galleries and to the global public. A new opportunity to collect art has emerged with cryptoart and nfts. Overall, a great deal of innovation in a very short time.

https://www.showclix.com/event/superblue-miami-tickets?_ga=2.118410944.890293004.1623334986-302149040.1623334986&_gac=1.73160964.1623334986.f990899f9d211f0e7f07e95dbd64ec3d

OPENING EVENT

Located at 1101 NW 23rd Street, in Miami, Superblue’s inaugural program features the debut of a new immersive environment, Every Wall Is a Door, featuring a new project by British designer, Es Devlin, a transcendent digital world created by teamLab, and an enveloping light-based work from none other than James Turrell, represented by Pace Gallery, from his iconic Ganzfeld series. Bringing together new and recent projects by teamLab in one, all-encompassing experience, this suite of interconnected artworks takes audiences on an exploration of the ambiguity between living and nonliving states of being, and the relationship between humanity and the natural world.

http://Superblue miami teamlab

TEAMLAB

teamLab is an interdisciplinary community of artists, programmers, engineers, CG animators, mathematicians, and architects that aims to transcend boundaries of perception, explore time, and the interaction between the self and the world which is integral to the ultimate form of the work – underscoring their collective presence as a means of creation and where distinctive parts interact to become a unified whole. Superblue is an independent new concept that straddles the divide between art and entertainment.

Mollie Dent-Brocklehurst

Conceived by Marc Glimcher, president and CEO of Pace Gallery, and the legendary British Mollie Dent-Brockhurst whose professional experience ranges from establishing the Garage Museum of Contemporary in Moscow to working in the gallery and auction worlds, Gagosian and Sotheby’s and curating exhibitions at her family property in England, Sudeley Castle. She has now teamed up with her former boss at Pace Gallery, president and CEO Marc Glimcher, to found Superblue. Dent-Brocklehurst, who is the enterprise’s CEO, says Superblue is courting a “much wider audience” than the standard gallery or museum.

James Turrell
Ganzfeld Series
Superblue

JAMES TURRELL  GANZFELD SERIES

In this project, the artist is on a mission to manipulate the viewer’s perception and experience by just using light. Never known as one to hurry in person or work, Turrell even describes himself as a tortoise as opposed to considering himself as a hare. He is now past 70 years of age and sports white hair and a mustache. For the past 40 years, this artist has been involved in the Roden Crater, a project that requires movement of more than one million cubic feet of earth, but nothing can convince him that he should have been done by now. With such a long term project under his wings, how did the idea of light come about? Here, Turrell creates a similar experience of “Ganzfeld”: a German word to describe the phenomenon of the total loss of depth perception as in the experience of a white-out.

https://publicdelivery.org/james-turrell-ganzfelds/

SUPERBLUE

Superblue represents a radical business model: a for-profit venture that exhibits seriously respected artists who produce experiential works, rather than objects, and pays them a cut of ticket sales. Now projected to open in Miami in early spring (Covid has delayed its debut several times), Superblue will mount the kind of large-scale, immersive exhibitions that have become wildly popular in recent years: Think Random International’s Rain Room, which had thousands waiting for hours in sweltering heat to experience a tech-generated rainfall, or teamLab, represented by Pace Gallery,  a digital-heavy collective that opened its own Tokyo exhibition space in 2018 and drew over 2 million visitors in its first year.

http://Robb Report, Lifestyle News, December 27, 2020

After more than a year of long stretches at home, narrowed perspectives of the world, limited travel and virtually no adventure except virtual ones, experiencing SUPERBLUE’S EVERY WALL IS A DOOR, immersive environment will feel like the ultimate freedom!

Airport, please!

Airport, please! Sarah Sze: Night into Day reopens at the Fondation Cartier in Paris

Sarah Sze
Night Into Day
Fondation Cartier

As an artist, I think about the effort, desire, and continual longing we’ve had over the years to make meaning of the world around us through materials. And to try and locate a kind of wonder, but also a kind of futility that lies in that very fragile pursuit. 

Sarah Sze

In 1994, after ten years in the town of Jouy-en-Josas near Versailles, the Fondation Cartier moved into the airy glass and steel building in central Paris designed especially by Jean Nouvel, who is also the creator of the Institut du Monde Arabe and the Musée du Quai Branly buildings. Famous in France and internationally for his unique way of dematerializing architecture, his challenge for Cartier was to harmoniously bring together 12,000 square feet of exhibition space and six stories of offices on the boulevard Raspail.

For her second solo exhibition at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, internationally renowned artist Sarah Sze presents a fully immersive installation that transforms the visitor’s experience of Jean Nouvel’s glass building. The exhibit had to close due to the pandemic but is reopening on May 19th. A genius of architecture, Jean Nouvel, has created the perfect aesthetic environment for the genius of Sarah Sze’s installations.

Sarah Sze, who represented the United States at the 2013 Venice Biennale, presents two immersive installations in the gallery spaces of Jean Nouvel’s iconic building. Commissioned by the Fondation Cartier, her new works explore how the proliferation of images—printed in magazines, gleaned from the Web, intercepted from outer space—fundamentally changes our relation to physical objects, memories, and time. The works also engages with the materiality and history of Nouvel’s structure and its surrounding garden. Enveloping the architecture, these sculptures will alter the visitor’s sense of gravity, scale, and time, confusing the boundaries between inside and outside, mirage and reality, past and present.

Sarah Sze
Night Into Day
Fondation Cartier

Twice Twilight and Tracing Fallen Sky, created specifically for this exhibition, are the latest works from Sze’s Timekeeper series, begun in 2015. This series investigates the image and the increasing overlaps in our experience of the virtual and material worlds. The planetarium and the pendulum, age-old scientific tools designed to map the cosmos and trace the earth’s rotation, inspire the structure of these sculptures. Sze has long been interested in scientific models as tools to measure time and space and to explain the natural world.

With dramatic shifts in scale—from the vast trajectory of the sun, to the minute action of lighting a match—the artist conveys the mystery and complexity inherent in our constant attempts to measure and model time and space. In contemplating the essence of these concepts, Sze reveals both the wonder and the futility behind our efforts to understand what will always remain just beyond our grasp.

Sarah Sze
Timekeeper Series

SARAH SZE: TIMEKEEPER SERIES

For over 20 years, Sarah Sze has produced celebrated works of art, synthesizing a near boundless range of everyday materials into intricate constructions that are both delicate and overwhelming. Sze’s monumental site-specific installation Timekeeper, originally presented at the Rose Art Museum and now in the collection of the Guggenheim Museum, combines sculpture, video and installation into a sprawling experiential work that approaches some of the most complex themes of her career: time’s passage and its marking in mechanical and biological forms. Iterations of the work have also been exhibited at the Copenhagen Contemporary Museum in Denmark, The High Museum of Art in Atlanta.

Timekeeper
Sarah Sze

The Timekeeper installation was a catalyst for a book which explores major new ideas in Sze’s work and practice. This ambitious work is extensively documented here alongside significant new texts by noted scholars on Sze and the themes that inform—and are informed by—her art, including the experience of time. In addition to the scholarly texts and abundant photographs of the work, the Timekeeper catalogue includes a section designed by Sze that function as a flip book to demonstrate the movement of time.

https://www.amazon.com/Sarah-Sze-Timekeeper/dp/1941366139

Sarah Sze

SARAH SZE

Sarah Sze was born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1969. Sze builds her installations and intricate sculptures from the minutiae of everyday life, imbuing mundane materials, marks, and processes with surprising significance. Combining domestic detritus and office supplies into fantastical miniatures, she builds her works, fractal-like, on an architectural scale.

Often incorporating electric lights and fans, water systems, and houseplants, Sze’s installations balance whimsy with ecological themes of interconnectivity and sustainability. Whether adapting to a venue or altering the urban fabric, Sze’s patchwork compositions seem to mirror the improvisational quality of cities, labor, and everyday life. On the edge between life and art, her work is alive with a mutable quality—as if anything could happen, or not.

Sarah Sze
Venice Biennale, 2013

Sarah Sze received a BA from Yale University (1991) and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts (1997). She has received many awards, including a Radcliffe Institute Fellowship (2005); John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2003); Louis Comfort Tiffany Award (1999); and the Rema Hort Mann Foundation Award (1997).

Major exhibitions of her work have appeared at the Asia Society Museum, New York (2011); 10th Biennale de Lyon (2010); BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art (2009); Malmö Konsthall (2006); Whitney Museum of Amerian Art (2003); Walker Art Center (2002); São Paulo Bienal (2002); Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (1999), and Foundation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris (1999), the Carnegie International (1999), and the 48th Venice Biennale (1999). Sarah Sze lives and works in New York City.

2013 Venice Biennale

2013 VENICE BIENNALE

Her works manipulate the space, be it a gallery, domestic interior or public space. In 2013, she represented the United States of America at the 55th International Art Exhibition — La Biennale di Venezia in Venice, Italy. Her exhibition Triple Point featured installations inside and outside the Pavilion building. Much of Sarah Sze’s solo show evolved on-site over a three-month installation period. For Triple Point, the artist used elements from the urban landscape of Venice such as photographs of stone, leaves from the Giardini, tickets from the Vaporetto.

In many ways, the work of Sarah Sze is, to the LRFA blog, an important predecessor of the new NFT cryptoart that is commanding so much attention.

Stay tuned!

Airport, please! Artfields, a town in South Carolina, transformed into a cultural destination, reopens after the pandemic

ARTFIELDS
April 23 – May 1, 2021

We believe art is a field that endures—through flourish and fallow. …Artfields

Spring has finally arrived. A time of regeneration. And there is nothing that represents the symbol of regeneration more than the town of Lake City, South Carolina. Today, the LRFA blog travels to a small town in South Carolina, by plane to Florence, SC and then 20 minutes by car, for an overwhelmingly engaging experience: ARTFIELDS: 2021, April 23-May 1st.

Artfields mural

The town itself, every shop, restaurant, The Inn at the Crossroads, the Library, the McNair Space Center, as well as three large gallery exhibition spaces established since Artfields was founded, is transformed into both indoor and outside spaces that display art, installation, video, sculpture, painting, photography, murals, and craft.

https://www.artfieldssc.org/

Darla Moore

Conceived and founded by visionary investor and philanthropist, Darla Moore, Artfields started in 2013 with a simple goal: to honor the artists of the 12 Southeastern states launching a phenomenal  annual art competition and festival to transform her once small, poor rural hometown into a thriving cultural destination. Passionate about the state of South Carolina and its rich legacy, Darla founded the Moore School of Business in its capital, Columbia, to further her commitment to education, in 2019 she endowed the Continuum, a 46,000 square foot center for tech education and workforce development in Lake City.

Moore Farms Botanical Garden

She founded and chairs the Palmetto Institute, a nonprofit think tank aimed at bolstering per capita income in South Carolina. She is the founder and chair of The Charleston Parks Conservancy, a foundation focused on enhancing the parks and public spaces of the City of Charleston, to highlight just a few of the commitments she has made to support and transform her beloved hometown and state.

Jones-Carter Gallery

The competition and exhibition offers over $100,000 in cash prizes. The winners of two People’s Choice Awards are determined by the votes of people visiting ArtFields; a panel of art professionals selects all the other awards, including the $50,000 Grand Prize and $25,000 Second Place award. Winners of the competition have had life-altering opportunities to engage in inspiring foreign travel, to exhibit in other venues and to develop their potential as professional artists.

Jamieson Kerr
Director, Artfields Collective

Up to 400 works of art are on display in locally-owned venues, from renovated 1920s warehouses and professional art spaces such as Jones-Carter Gallery and TRAX Visual Art Center to the library, the history museum, the Ronald E. McNair Life History Center, restaurants, boutiques and other shops. During ArtFields, Lake City, once one of South Carolina’s most prosperous agricultural communities, becomes a living art gallery as they recognize, celebrate and share the artistic talent of the Southeast.

Carla Angus
Education and Program Manager

As a visible way to show the power of art to revitalize and invigorate, the ArtFields Collective commissions artworks each year to enhance overlooked corners of the town. The Collective has commissioned over 9 murals and sculptures and an additional 9 artworks have been commissioned and contributed by other involved donors.

The ArtFields Collective is living, breathing proof of the power of art, a reminder that its beauty and soul and energy live within each of us—even in the harshest of seasons. In these divided and divisive times, Lake City’s Artfields has integrated its black and white, young and old, residents into a united, engaged community, working together to choose artworks, to welcome visitors and school groups to exhibitions and cultural events throughout the year  and to enjoy the rewards of living in the thriving town of Lake City.

Make ARTFIELDS a destination during the festival or at any time of the year. It is truly an enlightening, moving (and fun!) experience.

Lake City, South Carolina

Have a look at a huge selection of talent in this year’s competition!

https://www.artfieldssc.org/galleries/?festival_year=2021

 

Airport, please! We’re off to Maryland, to experience Glenstone, a synergy of great art, architecture and nature

Glenstone Museum

Guided by the personal vision of its founders, Mitchell and Emily Wei Rales, Glenstone is a private contemporary art museum located in Potomac, Maryland, just 15 miles from downtown Washington, D.C.

Glenstone founders
Emily and Mitchell Rales

Glenstone opened its doors to the public in 2006 and has provided discerning visitors with an experience of great art housed in a phenomenal architectural series of building in a beautiful setting. Glenstone seamlessly integrates art, architecture and nature into a serene and contemplative environment. A great destination at any time, now that spring is here and given the seemingly endless restrictions of the covid-19 virus, Glenstone offers a memorable and safe outdoor experience.

Richard Serra

The art collection assembles post-World War II artworks of the highest quality that trace the greatest historical shifts in the way we experience and understand art of the 20th and 21st centuries. These works are presented in a series of refined indoor and outdoor spaces designed to facilitate meaningful direct encounters with the works.

Charles Ray
Horse Rider

The Gallery was designed by the legendary architect, Charles Gwathmey, a founding partner of Gwathmey Siegel. In addition, the Pavilions offer 50,000 additional square feet of exhibition space featuring changing shows focused on the work of a single artist.

The Pavilions Water Court

Designed by Thomas Phifer and Partners, the eleven Rooms are unique, some hosting changing exhibitions and others conceived to show a particular artist’s work, thus deepening our understanding of the scope and breadth of the work and its place in the history of 20th and 21st Century art.

Michael Heizer

The rooms are connected by an enclosed passage that looks out onto an 18,000 square foot water court offering the viewer a chance to enjoy nature as well with its cultivation of seasonally changing plant life. In addition, 300 acres of landscape offer a thoughtfully conceived setting for the remarkable art and architecture that includes paths, trails, streams, meadows and forests as well as the extraordinary collection of contemporary outdoor sculpture.

Ellsworth Kelly

Next week, on April 8th, the museum will open its first touring exhibition of the works of the pioneer artist/quilt maker, Faith Ringgold. The collection of Glenstone Museum includes some of Faith Ringgold’s most politically powerful, flag inspired works. The paintings speak to America’s violent history of racism and injustice. Glenstone is the only venue in the United States for the exhibition which travels on to London’s Serpentine Museum and Sweden’s Bildmuseet.

“Faith Ringgold’s powerful depictions of the African American experience are as arresting today as they were when she first started making art nearly 60 years ago,” Emily Wei Rales, director and co-founder of Glenstone, said in a statement. Rales, who is curating the Glenstone exhibition, continued: “Her art has had a strong presence at the museum ever since we displayed one of her iconic paintings in our inaugural installation at the Pavilions in 2018, so it only seemed fitting for Faith Ringgold to be the first touring exhibition hosted at Glenstone. We are thrilled to collaborate with the Serpentine and the Bildmuseet in touring this major retrospective around the world, and in bringing it to American audiences.”

Faith Ringgold
Who’s Afraid of Aunt Jemima?

In the South, many of the quilts made during the Civil War were made by African-America slaves on plantations. As an artist concerned with feminism and racem Ringgold had immersed herself in creating story quilts as an expression that acknowledges both cultural and personal history. Domestic arts—sewing, quilting, weaving—have long been associated with women, and her quilting reflects the folk traditions and the struggles and achievements of Black women.

All the more reason to make Glenstone a destination this spring!

Faith Ringgold The American Collection#6 The Flag is Bleeding #2, 1997

Heading west, with Airport, please! to the Desert X 2021 Art Biennial in Coachella Valley, CA

Coachella Valley, California
Nicholas Galanino
Indian Land

“As much as the desert is a state of place, it is also a state of mind. Its borders are not singular but multiple, and it is defined as much by social geography as physical boundary.”

Neville Wakefield

Ghada Amer
Women’s Qualities

The call of the outdoors, warmer weather and the austere beauty of Coachella Valley, California, are overwhelmingly tempting reasons to head west, to see the third edition of Desert X, a massive exhibition featuring large-scaled  site-specific works by artists who explore the desert as both a place and an idea.

Alicia Kwade
ParaPivot (sempiternal clouds)

Desert X is amongst one of the first art experiences in the region since the lockdown. Apart from the artist projects it has commissioned, DX21 offers a safe viewing experience for public art. The works explore the reality of those who live in the desert and the socio-political context that shapes their lives. Curated by artistic director Neville Wakefield, and co-curator Cesar Garcia Alavarez, Desert X 2021 features many newly commissioned works that challenge our society’s conventions while imagining a shared future. As we, at long last, see an end to the restrictions of the covid-19 pandemic, this seems the perfect moment for these sculptural installations.

Eduardo Sarabia
The Passenger

Participating artists include Ghada Amer, Judy Chicago, Alicja Kwade, Oscar Murillo, and many others commissioned specifically for this project built on themes explored in previous iterations, looker deeply at ideas essential to the sustainability of our future, our identity and our history.

DX21 acknowledges the Cahuilla People as the original stewards of the land and pays its respects to the Cahuilla nation, past, present and emerging, whose identity is linked with the Coachella Valley since its inception. Projects will explore the themes of land rights and ownership, the desert as border, migration, and the racial narratives of the West.

Serge Attukwei Clottey
The Wishing Well

Neville Wakefield is a distinguished curator interested in exploring the ways in which art behaves outside of institutional venues. This interest led him to co-found Elevation1049, a site-specific biennial in Gstaad, Switzerland, and, for the last three years, to organize the recurring Desert X exhibitions in the Coachella Valley region of Southern California. As senior curatorial advisor for PS1 MoMA and curator of Frieze Projects, he gained a reputation for challenging the conditions that shape art in both commercial and noncommercial contexts. He has worked extensively with international institutions, including the Schaulager in Basel where he curated the Matthew Barney retrospective Prayer Sheet with the Wound and the Nail.

Kim Stringfellow
Jackrabbit Homestead

The LRFA blog recommends a stay at Two Bunch Palms, a contemporary wellness escape, famous for its lithium rich geothermal hot springs and lush grounds.  You’ll return to our constrained daily life truly refreshed.

Two Bunch Palms

Airport, please! James Turrell’s Skyspaces: down memory lane in today’s LRFA Blog post

 

Live Oak Quaker Meeting House
Houston, Texas

 

The LRFA Blog is looking forward to the James Turrell installation at Mass MoCA that opens in May.

“I can make the sky any color you choose.” — James Turrell

Thirty years in the making, James Turrell’s largest free-standing circular Skyspace opens on the MASS MoCA campus in May 2021. Measuring 40 feet in diameter and 40 feet high, this repurposed concrete water tank transforms into one of Turrell’s signature immersive light installations, carving out a small piece of the sky and framing it as a canvas with infinite depth. Skyspace joins Into the Light, a long-term retrospective of Turrell’s work, making MASS MoCA the only North American institution offering a comprehensive overview of the artist’s career.

The LRFA blog was reminded of a marvelous adventure a long time ago in Houston, when Texas seemed a safer destination than now. Then, any and all art-related trips were welcome, some spontaneous, most planned, to include client visits, seeing collections, visiting galleries and heading to the local museums. A memorable and beloved detour was a trip to the outskirts of the city of Houston. As an avid James Turrell fan, I was determined to visit as many of Turrell’s Skyspaces as possible, and also to pay tribute to a great client and friend who had visited Turrell’s Roden Crater and commissioned the artist to create a skyspace at his children’s school, The Greenwich Academy, in Connecticut.

The Skyspace project at Live Oak Friends Meeting House was completed in 2001 and incorporates two James Turrell installations. The first, Meeting House 2000, later re-named One Accord,  is open to the sky in clear weather. The second installation, called Night Piece, uses neon lights to simulate the evening sky. Created by James Turrell — one of the most important artists to pioneer the use of light as a medium, and himself a Quaker – the Skyspace is designed to allow viewers to experience what Turrell has called “a light that inhabits space, so that you feel light to be physically present.”

Quaker ideas about light are integral to Turrell’s practice.

“We use the vocabulary of light to describe a spiritual experience. One of the tenets in Quaker meditation is that you ‘go inside to greet the light.’ I am interested in this light that’s inside greeting the light that’s outside.”

Recommended reading: Art21’s Interview with Turrell on the Live Oak Quaker Meeting House.

file:///Users/leslierankow/Desktop/“Live%20Oak%20Friends%20Meeting%20House”%20—%20Art21.html

BIOGRAPHY

James Turrell was born into a devout Quaker family in Los Angeles in 1943. He tells a story of sitting in the Quaker meeting house with his grandmother when he was five or six years old. When everyone closed their eyes at the beginning of the meeting, he asked his grandmother what they were supposed to be doing. She told him: “Just wait, we’re going inside to greet the light.'”

Turrell was part of a generation accustomed to enormous advancements in technology and the excitement of the space race. In 1968 and 1969, he, along with artist Robert Irwin, worked on the Art and Technology program of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art with Ed Wortz, a scientist at a Southern California aerospace firm. Turrell was considered a member of the Light and Space Movement, that includes Mary Corse and Larry Bell.

James Turrell
Roden Crater
Arizona

The Roden Crater, though unfinished, has already been transformed over the past thirty years into a celestial observatory that intertwines art, architecture, and astronomy. Roden Crater is a 380,000-year-old extinct volcano in Arizona’s Painted Desert that Turrell acquired in the late 1970s. The land artist has spent nearly 50 years turning into his largest Skyspace  project yet, removing millions of cubic yards of earth to change its shape, and adding tunnels and chambers from which to view the sky. When completed, the project will contain 21 viewing spaces and six tunnels. While this project is not yet open to the public, several smaller projects of independent architectural spaces (Skyspaces) emulate chambers in the Roden Crater. Over 100 Skyspaces can be viewed in museums and countries across the world. Kanye West’s film Jesus is King, allowed us a glimpse into the Roden Crater since it served as the location for the film.

Jesus is King
Kanye West
Roden Crater

 

The LRFA blog recommends a pilgrimage to visit as many of James Turrell’s Skyscapes as possible, for now at least online. A very good Rx for the isolating and claustrophobic effects of quarantine restriction.

 

 

Outstanding highlights from Sikkema Jenkins with gallery partner Meg Malloy

Sheila Hicks

LAUNCHING SOLO SHOWS AND GROUP EXHIBITIONS EVERY MONTH THROUGHOUT THE YEAR CREATES A PHENOMENAL WORKLOAD FOR A GALLERY BUT THIS IS JUST THE PROVERBIAL TIP OF THE ICEBERG OF THE EFFORT IT TAKES TO SUPPORT ARTISTS, PLACE THEIR WORK IN COLLECTIONS, BOTH PRIVATE AND PUBLIC, GAIN INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION FOR THEIR WORK AND ORGANIZE EXHIBITIONS IN OTHER GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS. SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO. EXEMPLIFIES A GALLERY DEDICATED TO A LONG-TERM COMMITMENT TO THEIR ARTISTS, CONTINUALLY ADDING NEW TALENT TO A ROSTER OF ESTABLISHED ARTISTS, AND GIVING THEM A PERMANENT COLLABORATION BETWEEN GALLERY AND ARTIST TO PROVIDE BOTH COMMERCIAL AND CRITICAL SUCCESS.

THE LRFA BLOG IS VERY PLEASED TO WELCOME  BACK MEG MALLOY, PARTNER AT SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO., TO SHARE A VERY FEW OF THE MANY HIGHLIGHTS OF GALLERY NEWS AND TO SPEAK ABOUT THE GALLERY’S HOPES AND PLANS FOR THE FUTURE.

https://www.sikkemajenkinsco.com

Arturo Herrera

MEG, WELCOME BACK. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE EXHIBITIONS THAT YOU HAVE HAD IN THE LAST FIVE YEARS AT THE GALLERY THAT ARE PARTICULARLY MEMORABLE?

Kara’s last show was so exciting. We placed all of the works in the main space with major museums, and all of them have been on view at those institutions since those acquisitions.  I was just up at the Harvard Museums where I saw how many classes were held in front of Kara’s piece,  and it was great to see the work MoMA bought front and center in the rehang of the collection!   Mitch Epstein’s show addressing our uses and abuses of the land was very powerful, and will be shown at the Amon Carter next year.  Vik’s current show Museum of Ashes is striking a chord with visitors. It focuses on the tragic fire at  the National Museum in Rio and the loss of its irreplaceable artifacts, by recreating them out of the actual ashes.  

Louis Fratino

Louis Fratino’s show was so fresh and tender, and Jennifer’s work for her most recent show was just so powerful. It’s hard to convey how much pleasure I get  out of each of our artists’ shows.  Walking through the space and looking for four to five weeks, you really connect and see more, or learn to understand something different over time. It  Is such a gift.

MANY OF YOUR ARTISTS ARE HONORED WITH MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS AND SHOWS AT OTHER PRESTIGIOUS GALLERIES HERE AND ABROAD. HOW DO YOU ARRANGE FOR THESE AND HOW DO YOU PUBLICIZE THEM TO THE ARTIST AND GALLERY’S BEST ADVANTAGE?

We send out email blasts and use Instagram to announce exhibitions and awards.  We have also started making e-books for our shows with installation shots  to better share with a non local audience what the gallery and our artists are up to!

Josephine Halvorson

RECENT AWARDS AND MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS: 

Jeff Gibson wins the  MacArthur Foundation Fellowship

Kara Walker’s commission at Turbine Hall at the Tate Modern

Vik Muniz opening the new museum in Sarasota

Josephine Halvorson wins the James and Audrey Foster prize at the ICA, Boston

Jennifer Packer at MoCA this spring and the Serpentine this fall

Erin Shirreff at SF MoMA  now through November

Deana Lawson with survey forthcoming at Ica Boston at PS 1

Arturo Herrara’s  new work at Corbett vs Dempsey forthcoming

Marlene McCarty exhibit at the UB Art Galleries in Buffalo

Sheila  Hicks in MoMA’s Surrounds, the installation section on the 6th floor

Erin Shirreff

HOW HAVE YOU SEEN THE GALLERY SYSTEM CHANGE AND ADAPT TO GLOBALIZATION IN GENERAL AND HOW HAS SIKKEMA JENKINS APPROACHED THESE CHANGES IN PARTICULAR?

There is a wider worldwide audience.  There is also a lack of interaction as people use places like Artsy for inquiries.  I don’t like that!  I think we need a sense of who a buyer is. 

WE ARE IN THE THROES OF THE PRESENCE OF UBER-GALLERIES BOTH IN THE BRICKS AND MORTAR WORLD AND AT THE ART FAIRS. HOW DO SUBSTANTIAL, LONG-TERM BUT MORE MODEST GALLERIES DEAL WITH THIS COMPETITION?

We cannot compete with the uber galleries. But we can keep doing what we do best. Show great artists, work as hard as we can for them, place the work in the best collections we can, and remain approachable!

Mitch Epstein

WHAT EXHIBITIONS ARE YOU PLANNING FOR THE SEASON AHEAD?

We are currently showing Zipora Fried, a wonderful artist who was with the great  Stellar Rays until they closed. It is our first solo show with her and we are thrilled.  In the back galleries we are showing new  Cameron Martin paintings paired with vintage Kepes photographs.   Cameron’s show at James a Fuentes last year was a stunner, and we are delighted to show these new pieces.  In January, we will show new work by William Cordova and Josephine Halvorson’s Foster Prize show.  Then we will show Kara Walker, including some pieces that will go to Kunstmuseum  Basel for her forthcoming show there. In  May we will show  Merlin James, a still undervalued painter who’s got a terrific artists following.

We have to get Arturo Herrera and Kay Rosen on the books, both such strong wonderful artists

Kay Rosen

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE PLANS FOR THE GALLERY IN THE FUTURE?

To keep going!  To support our artists as best we can and to keep the non-uber gallery alive!

MEG, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR WONDERFUL CONTRIBUTION TO THE LRFA BLOG AND TO SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO.  GALLERY. IT IS NO WONDER THAT THE GALLERY HAS SUCH A LOYAL AND DEDICATED TEAM AND CONTINUES TO GROW AND THRIVE.

TIS THE SEASON, AND IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOGS, WE ARE DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE THE LRFA BLOG ANNUAL TRADITION:  POSTS FROM DOUG FLAMM, GAGOSIAN’S RARE BOOK EXPERT, WITH THIS YEAR’S IRRESISTIBLE GIFTS.

 

Welcome to Dallas! with Turon Travel expert, Nicholas Christopher

Dallas Arts District
Master Plan

DALLAS, FOUNDED AND NAMED BY JOHN NEELY BRYAN IN 1841, BEGAN AS A PERMANENT SETTLEMENT NEAR THE TRINITY RIVER AND ROSE TO HISTORICAL PROMINENCE AS THE GATEWAY CITY FOR THE OIL AND COTTON INDUSTRIES. TODAY, DALLAS IS HOME TO A COMMUNITY OF GENEROUS AND DEDICATED ART COLLECTORS AND PATRONS WHO SUPPORT THEIR CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS AND MUSEUMS WITH A GENEROSITY AS BIG AS THE STATE ITSELF.

THOSE ATTENDING THE DALLAS ART FAIR, APRIL 6th (PREVIEW) THROUGH APRIL 12th, ARE SURE TO ENJOY A WARM WELCOME. THE CITY OF DALLAS FEATURES THE LARGEST CONTIGUOUS URBAN ARTS DISTRICT IN THE UNITED STATES AND INCLUDES FIVE CULTURAL CENTERS DESIGNED BY INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED ARCHITECTS  I.M. PEI, RENZO PIANO AND NORMAN FOSTER AND REM KOOLHAAS.

DALLAS IS A GREAT DESTINATION ANY TIME OF YEAR AND THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO WELCOME TRAVEL EXPERT, NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER, FOUNDER AND PRINCIPAL OF TURON TRAVEL, THE TRAVEL AGENCY TO THE ART WORLD, AS OUR GUIDE. THANK YOU, NICHOLAS!

https://www.turontravel.com/about-us

The 2017 Dallas Art Fair is enjoying its 9th year.  This annual art event anchors the Dallas Art District, the largest arts district in the nation, spanning 68 acres and 19 contiguous blocks. The district is comprised of museums, performance halls, corporate offices, residences, restaurants, churches and even a school. The Dallas Art District has been a thirty-year plan in the making and now boast buildings by four Pritzker Prize winning architects within a span of several blocks and also includes significant buildings from as far back as the late 1880s, just 40 years after Dallas was founded.

The 2017 DALLAS ART FAIR, opening on Thursday April 6th and continuing through Sunday, the 9th, will feature prominent national and international art dealers and galleries exhibiting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, video, and installation by modern and contemporary artists. As with all successful fairs, Dallas’ arts institutes, galleries and museums put forth new and exciting exhibitions to complement the mission of the fair.

Dallas Art Fair
Preview Gala 2016

This makes for a full week around the Dallas Art Fair with the annual Preview Gala Benefit setting the stage. The Preview Gala benefits the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center and Dallas Contemporary, and will offer art patrons and Dallas’ top collectors the opportunity to preview and purchase exhibited works prior to the public opening of the fair.

The Dallas Art Fair venue is conveniently set in a private park located across from the Dallas Museum of Art and the Nasher Sculpture Center.

http://dallasartfair.com/visiting-the-fair/

https://www.dma.org/visit

The Dallas Museum of Art’s collection contains over 24,000 works of art from all cultures and time periods spanning 5,000 years of human creativity. The collection is dynamic; new acquisitions are being added all the time and the galleries are constantly changing. A particularly compelling current DMA exhibition for those attending the Art Fair is entitled Passages in Modern Art: 1946–1996.

Jasper Johns
Device
1961-1962

Taken from the DMA’s acclaimed contemporary collection, this exhibit is a great indicator of the dedication and support of the Dallas art community and includes recent acquisitions, rarely seen works, and newly conserved paintings and sculpture. Art by such iconic artists as Bernd and Hilla Becher, Philip Guston, Jasper Johns, Yayoi Kusama, and Mark Rothko is presented alongside their lesser-known contemporaries.

Yayoi Kusama
Accumulation
1962-1964

https://www.dma.org/art/exhibitions/passages-modern-art-1946-1996

Nasher Sculpture Center by Renzo Piano

The birth and growth of the Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection started more than 50 years ago. In 1950, the Nashers traveled to Mexico, where they became interested in pre-Columbian art and bought the first works in what would become a sizable collection of objects from ancient Latin America. They soon bought other ethnographic and archaeological works and also acquired a number of important American modernist paintings and prints. Mr. Nasher often credits this early involvement with pre-Columbian and other tribal arts as having whetted the Nashers’ appetite for, and appreciation of, modern three-dimensional works.

Henry Moore
Piece no. 3: Vertebrae 1968
Nasher Sculpture Center

By the late-1960s, the Nashers had made their first significant acquisitions of modern sculpture. These included Jean Arp’s Torso with Buds (1961), two major bronzes by Henry Moore, Three Piece No. 3: Vertebrae (1968) and Two Piece Reclining Figure No.9 (1968, no longer in the Collection), and Barbara Hepworth’s large and powerful Squares with Two Circles (Monolith) (1963, cast 1964). In rapid succession, they went on to acquire works by, among others, Joan Miró, Alexander Calder and Isamu Noguchi.

Pierre Huyghe
La déraison, 2014
Concrete, marble, heating system, water, and plants, 36 ¼ x 97 ¾ x 51 in.

At the Nasher, don’t miss the remarkable installation of two works by Pierre Huyghe, 2017 Nasher Prize Laureate. Huyghe has profoundly expanded the parameters of sculpture through artworks encompassing a variety of materials and disciplines. As part of the celebrations surrounding Nasher Prize, the Nasher Sculpture Center presents two important works by the artist: an active marine ecosystem and a living sculpture.

 

Pierre Huyghe
Untitled, 2013
Live marine ecosystem, aquarium, resin shell

The Arts District is home to many other Arts Institutions all within walking distant of the fair.  There is the Fashion Industry Gallery which also houses the Dallas Art Fair,  along with The Annette Strauss Artist Square, the Belo Mansion/Dallas Bar Association, Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, Dallas Black Dance Theatre, Dallas Symphony Orchestra, Dallas Theater Center/Arts District Theater, Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, and the Trammell & Margaret Crow Collection of Asian Art.  Plenty to see and do during your stay in Dallas.

JOIN US FOR THE NEXT LRFA POST WITH NICHOLAS TO VISIT OTHER ART EXHIBITIONS AND HAVE A DELICIOUS BITE OR TWO ALONG THE WAY!