Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

INTERNATIONAL ART ADVISORY SERVICE

Tag: Paris

Airport, please! heads to Dubai to visit Galerie Perrotin’s opening of another new space in the Middle East

Galerie Perrotin Dubai

Emmanuel Perrotin founded his first gallery in 1990 at the age of twenty-one. He has worked closely with his impressive  roster of international artists, some for more than twenty-five years, to help fulfill their ambitious projects. Perrotin has galleries in Paris, Hong Kong, New York, Seoul, Tokyo, and Shanghai, totaling approximately 7,500 square meters (80,500 square feet) of exhibition space across its ten locations.

Located since 2005 in an eighteenth-century mansion, Perrotin has three gallery spaces totaling approximately 1,600 square meters (17,000 sq. ft.) in the Marais district of Paris. Two years after it opened, the original Paris gallery expanded into its space on Impasse Saint-Claude. In 2014, Perrotin opened a 700-square-meter (7,500 sq. ft.) showroom known as the Salle de Bal, in a former ballroom in the Hôtel d’Ecquevilly, a seventeenth-century hôtel particulier. In June 2020, Perrotin opens a space totaling 70 square meters (750 sq. ft.) on Avenue Matignon in the west of Paris.

In 2021, a new gallery dedicated to secondary market will take a five-storey townhouse, (4,090 square feet, 380 sq. m.) located 8 avenue Matignon nearby Christie’s and Sotheby’s.

https://www.perrotin.com

In all, the Paris gallery spaces amount to 29,600 square feet (2,750 sq. m.).

Emmanuel Perrotin

 

In May of 2012, Perrotin opened its Hong Kong gallery on the seventeenth floor of 50 Connaught Road Central (650 sq. m./approx. 7,000 sq. ft.), overlooking Victoria Harbour. In 2020, the Hong Kong gallery moved across the harbor to K11 ATELIER Victoria Dockside on the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront.

Galerie Perrotin New York, upper east side

From 2013 to 2016, Perrotin New York was housed in a historic building on the Upper East Side’s iconic Madison Avenue. After three successful years there, the gallery expanded in April of 2017 to a 2,300-square-meter (25,000 sq. ft.) space, relocating to 130 Orchard Street in New York’s most dynamic arts neighborhood, the Lower East Side. Perrotin New York includes a bookshop featuring unique editions and books published by the gallery.

Galerie Perrotin Seoul

In 2016, Perrotin inaugurated a 240-square-meter (2,600 sq. ft.) space in Seoul. Perrotin Seoul is located in the heart of Jongno-gu district, the city’s museum and gallery district, in close proximity to the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art and Daelim Museum and just in front of the Blue House, the official residence of the President, and Gyeongbok Palace.

Galerie Perrotin Tokyo

In June of 2017, Perrotin opened a space in Tokyo on the ground floor of the Piramide Building. The gallery is located in the center of the Roppongi area, a vibrant cultural neighborhood that is home to a large number of museums, including the Mori Art Museum, Suntory Museum of Art, and National Art Center, as well as many well-established galleries. In 2019, the gallery expanded to a 230 square meter (2,500 sq. ft.) space. In 2019 the gallery expanded, and it now totals 230 square meters (2,500 sq. ft.) of exhibition space in Tokyo.

Galerie Perrotin Shanghai

In 2018, Perrotin launched a gallery in Shanghai, in the heart of the city’s Bund quarter. Perrotin Shanghai occupies the top floor of a historic three-story brick building known as the Amber Building, a former warehouse built in 1937, used by the Central Bank of China during the Republican period. Totaling 1,300 square meters (14,000 sq. ft.), the gallery space includes a mezzanine and several exhibition rooms. In keeping with the building’s modernist elegance, original 1930s elements have been preserved, including the wooden beam ceiling, which is 6 meters (20 ft.) in height.

Perrotin participates in more than twenty art fairs each year, including Art Basel (Basel, Miami, Hong Kong); Frieze (London, New York, Los Angeles); FIAC (Paris); the Dallas Art Fair; Expo Chicago; ART021 and West Bund Art & Design (Shanghai); the Armory Show and TEFAF (New York); and artgenève (Geneva).

The gallery has expanded its mission in recent years, most notably through the production of thoughtful editorial content, such as podcast and video, as well as developing a programmatic calendar, which includes panel discussions, education workshops for children, and concerts.

The gallery also publishes catalogues, editions, and goodies, available in its bookstores.

Galerie Perrotin Dubai

Perrotin is pleased to announce the opening of a new gallery in Dubai in 2022. It is interesting to mark the geographical locations of his galleries as they are hot spots for new collectors and new pockets of wealth.

Now established in seven cities—Paris, Hong Kong, New York, Seoul, Tokyo, Shanghai, and Dubai—the gallery continues to expand its reach with the opening of this new permanent address in the Middle East.

Perrotin Dubai will be operated by both Perrotin Primary Market and Perrotin Secondary Market, founded by Tom-David Bastok, Dylan Lessel and Emmanuel Perrotin.

The gallery is located in the DIFC, the heart of Dubai, not far from Christie’s, Sotheby’s and other galleries, and close to many of the city’s best restaurants and landmarks.

The new 100-square-meter space will present primary market works by artists represented by the gallery alongside secondary market works, a recently launched and successful business that continues to grow.

As the war in the Ukraine grows, the world morphs into a new political shape, threatened by Putin’s actions and by American sanctions. The LRFA blog wants to explore the new Middle East, courtesy of the vision of Emmanuel Perrotin and his galleries in this very wealthy  part of the world.

Airport, please! Heading to the Tornabuoni Gallery to see Alighiero Boetti’s Thinking About Afghanistan

 

MAPPA, 1971
Alighiero Boetti

In the Spring of 1971 while in search of something distant, Alighiero Boetti discovered Afghanistan. It was the beginning of a relationship that tied the man and his work to the people of Afghan for 23 years until his death in 1994. Boetti maintained these ties during the period of exile following the Soviet invasion of 1979, even welcoming some of his assistants into his own household in Italy. Afghanistan is the scene of the production of many of Boetti’s best-known works including Mappa 1971-1994 ,made by female Afghan embroiderers. His artistic intention, his experience of the country and his intellectual curiosity gave rise to works that act as both cutural and geopolitical seismographs. Boetti’s work bears witness to the socio-politico transformations that affected the Middle East in the 70s and 80s, seeing, ,for example, the embroiderers flee to Peshawar in Pakistan where some of the last tapestries were produced.

Tornabuoni Art
Paris, France

During our recent pandemic, our time of claustrophia, social distancing and limited travel wore heavily on all of those who impulsively booked a flight at will, going to art fairs, to unexplored cities, to see a museum exhibit and coming home, freedom! to escape one’s quotidian life and relationships. The LRFA blog, as a matter of fact, was inspired by the need to travel the world if only in the imagination.

TORNABUONI ARTE, Paris

Alighiero Boettti- Thinking about Afghanistan presents a selection of work at the gallery’s 16, avenue Matignon, 7500 in Paris, a converted train station flooded with skylights and architectural elements, continued from October 18 through December 22nd, 2021.

The exhibit presented a selection of works typical of this period, The Lavori Postali (Postal Works) which are iconic tapestries and a series of works on paper conceived in Boetti’s Roman studio when he could not travel to Afghanistan. These include The First Work of the Year While Thinking about Afghanistan – and includes a rich selection of photographs and archival documents owned by the Boetti estate, which provides insight into the context in which Alighiero Boetti worked.

Alighiero Boetti

BIO ALIGHIERO BOETTI Turin 1940- Rome, 1994

Alighiero Boetti – or Alighiero e Boetti as he liked to sign his works from 1971 – was born in Turin, Italy. The son of lawyer Corrado Boetti and violinist Adelina Marchisio, he began his career as a self-taught artist, after having briefly studied Business and Economics at the University of Turin.

In 1967, the Christian Stein gallery in Turin offered Boetti his first solo show, within a context marked by the recent birth of Arte Povera. The young artist was subsequently invited to take part in all group exhibitions around this theme, that paved the way for total freedom of artistic expression, and in shows on Conceptual Art such as ‘When Attitudes become Form’ at the Kunsthalle Basel in 1969.

The latter marked Boetti’s detachment from Arte Povera in favor of conceptual experimentation through duplication, symmetry and multiplication. His works then focused on codes of classification and communication, working with numbers, maps and alphabets, playing with a variety of materials and techniques, reminiscent of ancient Asian craftsmanship.

Boetti’s passion for Afghanistan began in the early 1970s with a few trips that later turned into long stays, and in 1971 Boetti and his wife opened the ‘One Hotel’ in Kabul. During this time Boetti began working on the Mappe (Maps), entrusting the realization of his famous tapestries to Afghan female embroiderers. The colours and shapes of the flags changed according to the world’s geopolitical context at the time of the realisation (1971-1994). Kabul inspired another famous series entitled Frasi messe al quadrato (Squared Sentences). After the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan (December 1979 – February 1980), the discontinuation of the production of tapestries led him to work with Afghan refugees in Peshawar, Pakistan (as from 1986).

Lavori Postale
Alighiero Boetti

A great traveller, Boetti spent long periods in different continents. Countries like Ethiopia, Guatemala and Japan inspired him to create his Lavori postali (Postal Works) with local stamps. Evoking the passing of time, these pieces were based on the mathematical mutation of the stamps and on the unpredictable adventure of the world’s postal services.

The revolutionary aspect of Boetti’s work was the creation of a paradigm within which to act for the people involved in the creative process, thus radically questioning the role of the artist and the impact of chance, sequence, repetition and authorship in the creation of a work of art. His work and attitude have strongly influenced the next generation of artists in Italy and around the world.

Traveling to Afghanistan at the beginning of the 1970s, he was introduced to the traditional craft of embroidery, which marked a turning point in the artist’s career. In his consequent Territori Occupati series (1971-92) he commissioned Afghan embroiderers to create a maps of the world, with each country bearing the colors and pattern of its flag. The commission grew into a beautifully crafted, large-scale series of maps produced over a period of twenty years in Kabul, Afghanistan and Peshawar, Pakistan. The land mass of each country is filled in with its flag.

We can now become more selective, targeting fairs and cities in which we intend to stay at least a few days. See you all at Miami Art Basel, in December?

Airport, please! Sarah Sze: Night into Day reopens at the Fondation Cartier in Paris

Sarah Sze
Night Into Day
Fondation Cartier

As an artist, I think about the effort, desire, and continual longing we’ve had over the years to make meaning of the world around us through materials. And to try and locate a kind of wonder, but also a kind of futility that lies in that very fragile pursuit. 

Sarah Sze

In 1994, after ten years in the town of Jouy-en-Josas near Versailles, the Fondation Cartier moved into the airy glass and steel building in central Paris designed especially by Jean Nouvel, who is also the creator of the Institut du Monde Arabe and the Musée du Quai Branly buildings. Famous in France and internationally for his unique way of dematerializing architecture, his challenge for Cartier was to harmoniously bring together 12,000 square feet of exhibition space and six stories of offices on the boulevard Raspail.

For her second solo exhibition at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, internationally renowned artist Sarah Sze presents a fully immersive installation that transforms the visitor’s experience of Jean Nouvel’s glass building. The exhibit had to close due to the pandemic but is reopening on May 19th. A genius of architecture, Jean Nouvel, has created the perfect aesthetic environment for the genius of Sarah Sze’s installations.

Sarah Sze, who represented the United States at the 2013 Venice Biennale, presents two immersive installations in the gallery spaces of Jean Nouvel’s iconic building. Commissioned by the Fondation Cartier, her new works explore how the proliferation of images—printed in magazines, gleaned from the Web, intercepted from outer space—fundamentally changes our relation to physical objects, memories, and time. The works also engages with the materiality and history of Nouvel’s structure and its surrounding garden. Enveloping the architecture, these sculptures will alter the visitor’s sense of gravity, scale, and time, confusing the boundaries between inside and outside, mirage and reality, past and present.

Sarah Sze
Night Into Day
Fondation Cartier

Twice Twilight and Tracing Fallen Sky, created specifically for this exhibition, are the latest works from Sze’s Timekeeper series, begun in 2015. This series investigates the image and the increasing overlaps in our experience of the virtual and material worlds. The planetarium and the pendulum, age-old scientific tools designed to map the cosmos and trace the earth’s rotation, inspire the structure of these sculptures. Sze has long been interested in scientific models as tools to measure time and space and to explain the natural world.

With dramatic shifts in scale—from the vast trajectory of the sun, to the minute action of lighting a match—the artist conveys the mystery and complexity inherent in our constant attempts to measure and model time and space. In contemplating the essence of these concepts, Sze reveals both the wonder and the futility behind our efforts to understand what will always remain just beyond our grasp.

Sarah Sze
Timekeeper Series

SARAH SZE: TIMEKEEPER SERIES

For over 20 years, Sarah Sze has produced celebrated works of art, synthesizing a near boundless range of everyday materials into intricate constructions that are both delicate and overwhelming. Sze’s monumental site-specific installation Timekeeper, originally presented at the Rose Art Museum and now in the collection of the Guggenheim Museum, combines sculpture, video and installation into a sprawling experiential work that approaches some of the most complex themes of her career: time’s passage and its marking in mechanical and biological forms. Iterations of the work have also been exhibited at the Copenhagen Contemporary Museum in Denmark, The High Museum of Art in Atlanta.

Timekeeper
Sarah Sze

The Timekeeper installation was a catalyst for a book which explores major new ideas in Sze’s work and practice. This ambitious work is extensively documented here alongside significant new texts by noted scholars on Sze and the themes that inform—and are informed by—her art, including the experience of time. In addition to the scholarly texts and abundant photographs of the work, the Timekeeper catalogue includes a section designed by Sze that function as a flip book to demonstrate the movement of time.

https://www.amazon.com/Sarah-Sze-Timekeeper/dp/1941366139

Sarah Sze

SARAH SZE

Sarah Sze was born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1969. Sze builds her installations and intricate sculptures from the minutiae of everyday life, imbuing mundane materials, marks, and processes with surprising significance. Combining domestic detritus and office supplies into fantastical miniatures, she builds her works, fractal-like, on an architectural scale.

Often incorporating electric lights and fans, water systems, and houseplants, Sze’s installations balance whimsy with ecological themes of interconnectivity and sustainability. Whether adapting to a venue or altering the urban fabric, Sze’s patchwork compositions seem to mirror the improvisational quality of cities, labor, and everyday life. On the edge between life and art, her work is alive with a mutable quality—as if anything could happen, or not.

Sarah Sze
Venice Biennale, 2013

Sarah Sze received a BA from Yale University (1991) and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts (1997). She has received many awards, including a Radcliffe Institute Fellowship (2005); John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2003); Louis Comfort Tiffany Award (1999); and the Rema Hort Mann Foundation Award (1997).

Major exhibitions of her work have appeared at the Asia Society Museum, New York (2011); 10th Biennale de Lyon (2010); BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art (2009); Malmö Konsthall (2006); Whitney Museum of Amerian Art (2003); Walker Art Center (2002); São Paulo Bienal (2002); Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (1999), and Foundation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris (1999), the Carnegie International (1999), and the 48th Venice Biennale (1999). Sarah Sze lives and works in New York City.

2013 Venice Biennale

2013 VENICE BIENNALE

Her works manipulate the space, be it a gallery, domestic interior or public space. In 2013, she represented the United States of America at the 55th International Art Exhibition — La Biennale di Venezia in Venice, Italy. Her exhibition Triple Point featured installations inside and outside the Pavilion building. Much of Sarah Sze’s solo show evolved on-site over a three-month installation period. For Triple Point, the artist used elements from the urban landscape of Venice such as photographs of stone, leaves from the Giardini, tickets from the Vaporetto.

In many ways, the work of Sarah Sze is, to the LRFA blog, an important predecessor of the new NFT cryptoart that is commanding so much attention.

Stay tuned!

The future is now: traditions and innovations at David Zwirner with gallery partner Greg Lulay and director Veronique Ansorge

 

Isa Genzken
Paris New York
Opening at David Zwirner, Paris

OVER THE LAST DECADE, DAVID ZWIRNER HAS UNDERGONE AN UNPRECEDENTED TRANSFORMATION AND STANDS AS A MAJOR DRIVING FORCE IN REDEFINING WHAT A GALLERY PRESENTS AND HOW AUDIENCES INTERACT WITH THE ART AND EXHIBITIONS. A NEW BREED OF EXPANSIVE AND TRANSPORTING SHOWS OFFERS UNIQUE EXPERIENCES TO A WIDER , CULTURALLY ENGAGED PUBLIC WHILE ALWAYS SUPPORTING AND HONORING THEIR ARTISTS’ AMBITIOUS VISIONS.

THE LOCKDOWN AND PANDEMIC CRISIS ONLY SERVED TO FURTHER STIMULATE THEIR EFFORTS TO SUPPORT THEIR ARTISTS, THEIR GALLERIES AND OTHER SMALLER STRUGGLING GALLERIES  REACHING OUT IN NEW AND INNOVATIVE WAYS TO THEIR INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC.

William Eggleston
David Zwirner Hong Kong
Opening September 10

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG WARMLY WELCOME BACK VERONIQUE ANSORGE, GALLERY DIRECTOR AND GREG LULAY, GALLERY PARTNER, TO SHARE THEIR ARTICULATE VISION OF DAVID ZWIRNER NOW AND IN THE FUTURE.

GREG AND VERONIQUE, ART FAIRS HAVE BECOME A DOMINANT VEHICLE TO SHOW ARTISTS. WHEN THE PANDEMIC HIT, HONG KONG ART BASEL WAS THE FIRST FAIR TO CREATE EXCLUSIVELY VIEWING ROOMS FOR ALL THE EXHIBITORS AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO BEING AT THE FAIR.

HOW DID THE GALLERIES IN GENERAL DO AND HOW SUCCESSFUL WERE THE MAJOR INTERNATIONAL GALLERIES?

GL: I think that the dominant form of physically seeing work still happens within the galleries and museums themselves. After that, comes the art fair setting.  

Since the 1970s, with the birth of Art Cologne, and on to the long-standing fairs like Art Basel, we’ve seen the landscape of art commerce change dramatically. The art world and the art fair sector of that art world has grown tremendously into a global industry. Regional art fairs are now held across the globe and are typically intended to serve the collector base of the specific country or region where they take place. Other art fairs have a much wider reach in terms of exhibiting galleries and the international patrons that visit and buy from the fair. The difference between the two types of fairs has to do with the brand behind the fairs, the destination, the time in the yearly calendar, and the longevity of the fair as an institution. As the art fair model of business took off, galleries became more reliant upon them for a large part of their annual business. In one week and in one spot you are able to interact with large numbers of new and existing clients, connect with curators, and make significant sales. Over the years we’ve found that all of that activity for each fair is precluded by digital outreach to our clients. So, there’s been a growing online component of what we do at a fair which occurs digitally even before we set foot in our booth. 

Suzan Frecon
Opening David Zwirner Gallery
September 10 – October 17, 2020

I think one of the big questions is, will the digital art fair exchange begin to replace the need for an actual art fair? 

When Art Basel Hong Kong was cancelled earlier this year due to Covid-19, all galleries had to turn solely to online presentations and interactions supported by Basel’s new online platform. Because our gallery already had developed the technology to support an online viewing room experience, we were able to do something in tandem with Art Basel’s platform. We were able to reach people who were interested in looking at art even if they couldn’t go to the fair, let alone leave their homes.

VA: I’m very happy that it was a success for the gallery. We will all have to see what is happening now based on the health crisis in the long run for the art fairs. But you do miss the interactions with clients in an art fair context, and human interaction will certainly not be able to be replaced completely.

GL: Certainly not. I think that a key component of this industry is that it is experiential and social. People who are interested in building collections and living with art love the personal connections they make with artists, curators, and art dealers. There is a social aspect of gallery openings and art fairs that will never be replaced by a purely online experience. What we have built online is something to run in tandem with what we are already doing in our physical spaces. 

Harold Ancart: Traveling Light
David Zwirner Gallery West 19th Street
Opening September 10th

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE OTHER WAYS IN WHICH YOU ARE NOW COMMUNICATING WITH CLIENTS AND ARTISTS IN LIGHT OF THE CURRENT CRISIS?

GL: I think in a time when people are forced to be at home, we all still have a need to be connected. Even this conversation that we are having now is being done virtually, where we can see each other on the screen and have a conversation. This is something we are doing on a daily basis with our artists, many of which are busy in their studios, but they need a connection and want a connection just like the rest of us.

VA: And obviously all these video conferencing apps that allow you to have meetings and interact with multiple people are very helpful both in terms of internal meetings and meetings with artists. I do feel a lot of clients also appreciate calls and ways of communicating where we see each other.

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS TO DEVELOP YOUR ONLINE PRESENCE IN THE FUTURE?

GL: While we discussed this earlier,  I think it’s worth noting that while we have focused on this initiative for the past several years, we are only just beginning and will continue to explore what this new online platform can offer to our artists.

VA: Yes and also making it usable in a way where artists can really have control over the experience the visitor has on the site; the artist can put their artistic vision in it. 

Josh Smith
David Zwirner, New York East 69th, London, Grafton Street
Opening September 15th

DO YOU AGREE THAT THIS IS MORE AND MORE THE FUTURE OF THE GALLERY WORLD, AND THAT THE COVID-19 WAS MORE OF A CATALYST TO AN ALREADY ESTABLISHED TREND?

VA: Yes, Covid-19 is somewhat of a catalyst. As the other options are temporarily inactivated it is forcing us to accelerate our performance in the digital space. 

GL: Exactly, I think that this is obviously the way in which the world is moving, and people are becoming more and more accustomed to receiving content of all sorts online. Like we’ve said, these changes are not going to replace the essential in-person exchange or experience. But certainly in this moment when none of us can physically be with each other or walk into a gallery space, the necessity to charge ahead in some fashion has been a catalyst for this digital exchange on a larger scale. 

GL: It’s worth saying that the gallery in its 25+ years has weathered several storms, including the attacks on September 11th and Hurricane Sandy. This is a new experience for all of us, and a challenge we will overcome together, hopefully stronger as a gallery and as a world. During this uncertain time we have come together as a gallery to help those who may be struggling even more than we are. We’ve been able to share our existing technology and Online Viewing Room with galleries in New York and London who don’t have the same capabilities to present and sell artworks online. With an initiative called Platform: New York, and Platform: London, respectively, we’ve invited a group of young gallerists from those cities to select one artist from their program to feature on our online viewing room platform. We’re hosting our friends and neighboring galleries in an effort to connect them with collectors who are interested in buying art during this very challenging moment.

Platform
David Zwirner Gallery

IT HAS BEEN A GREAT PRIVILEGE TO HAVE GREG AND VERONIQUE SHARE THEIR THOUGHTFUL AND DEEPLY KNOWLEDGEABLE PERSPECTIVE ON THE DAVID ZWIRNER GALLERY PLATFORM, PHILOSOPHY AND ARTIST-CENTRIC POINT OF VIEW AND THEIR VISION OF OUR ART WORLD IN GENERAL NOW AND IN THE FUTURE.  SO MANY THANKS TO YOU BOTH!

THE LRFA BLOG WILL RESUME AFTER LABOR DAY. WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO A CONVERSATION WITH LAURA LESTER  AND LEARNING ABOUT HER NEW POSITION AS DIRECTOR OF GREY GALLERY, NEW YORK.

A very warm welcome to David Zwirner Gallery’s Veronique Ansorge and Greg Lulay

David Zwirner and gallery partners by John McCracken’s FAIR (2011)
David Zwirner Gallery, West 20th St, NY

IN JANUARY 2018, DAVID ZWIRNER GALLERY CELEBRATED ITS 25TH ANNIVERSARY. WITH AN IMPECCABLE ROSTER OF LIVING ARTISTS AND ARTISTS’ ESTATES AND A GLOBAL NETWORK OF GALLERIES IN NEW YORK, LONDON, PARIS, AND HONG KONG, DAVID ZWIRNER HAS ALWAYS BEEN A VISIONARY DEALER. INITIALLY, HE OPENED A RELATIVELY SMALL SPACE AT 43 GREENE STREET IN THE SOHO DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.  MANY LOCATIONS LATER, MUCH EXPANSION AND AN INTERNATIONAL PRESENCE AS ONE OF THE VERY TOP LEADING GALLERIES WORLDWIDE, THE ONE CONSISTENT THREAD THROUGHOUT THE NOW TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS IS DAVID ZWIRNER’S COMMITMENT TO SHOWING CHALLENGING, THOUGHTFUL, MEANINGFUL WORKS OF ART WITHOUT COMPROMISE.

David Zwirner
First gallery in SoHo
43 Greene Street, New York

FROM GREENE STREET TO CHELSEA IN NEW YORK TO THE UPPER EAST SIDE OF MANHATTAN, FROM LONDON TO HONG KONG WITH A MUCH-ANTICIPATED EXPANSION IN CHELSEA UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF ARCHITECT EXTRAORDINAIRE, ANNABELLE SELLDORF, ZWIRNER HAS CREATED AN INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY OF DEDICATED STAFF, COMMITTED COLLECTORS, CURATORS AND SUPPORTERS. THE GALLERY’S COMMITMENT TO ITS ARTISTS AND TO THE INTEGRITY OF THEIR WORK SET A STANDARD WHEN THE GALLERY FIRST OPENED THAT HAS CONTINUED TO THIS DAY. MANY OF THE ARTISTS IN AN EXHIBITION, FIVE YEARS, 1993-1998, COMMEMORATING THE GALLERY’S FIRST FIVE YEARS ON GREENE STREET, CONTINUE TO BE REPRESENTED BY DAVID ZWIRNER GALLERY TODAY.

Veronique Ansorge
Director
David Zwirner Gallery, New York

THE LRFA BLOG IS HONORED TO WELCOME VERONIQUE ANSORGE, DIRECTOR AT DAVID ZWIRNER, 525 WEST 19th STREET, IN CHELSEA, NEW YORK AND GREG LULAY, PARTNER AT DAVID ZWIRNER, 537 WEST 20th STREET, NEW YORK. COLLEAGUES AND FRIENDS, THEY HAVE JOINED FORCES TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE LRFA BLOG. AFTER AN INITIAL INTRODUCTION TO BOTH OF THEM, WE WILL FOCUS ON THE RELEVANCE OF THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC AND ITS IMPACT ON THE WAY IN WHICH ONE OF THE GREAT INTERNATIONAL GALLERIES HAS HAD THE FORESIGHT TO PREPARE FOR THIS UNSEEN CRISIS.

New York: 19th Street

https://www.davidzwirner.com/galleries

VERONIQUE AND GREG, THANK YOU SO MUCH. I KNOW YOU ARE BOTH AS BUSY AS EVER, WORKING FROM HOME, ONLINE AND JUST RECENTLY, BY APPOINTMENT AT THE NEW YORK GALLERIES, TO CONTACT CLIENTS AND CONTINUE TO SUPPORT THE PRESENCE AND COMMERCE OF THE GALLERY DURING THE SHUTDOWN.

FIRST, A BIT ABOUT YOUR PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUNDS.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BOTH BEEN AT THE GALLERY AND HOW DID YOU COME TO WORK AT ZWIRNER? WAS YOUR BACKGROUND IN THE ARTS, AS AN ACADEMIC, IN THE AUCTION WORLD OR IN ANOTHER GALLERY?

Greg Lulay:

I’ve been at the gallery for 17 years, starting at Zwirner & Wirth, which was the secondary market gallery David opened on the Upper East Side in 2000. Prior to that, I was at university in Seattle, where I studied business, fine arts, and art history, and worked in a gallery in Seattle upon graduation. I worked for a gallery there for a few years, which brought me to New York in 1999. 

Veronique Ansorge:

I’m originally from Germany, and I  started at the gallery in December 2007. I have an MBA, studied Economics in college, and previously worked in business consulting and marketing. I switched careers because of my interest in art. I started as David’s assistant and was lucky enough to grow within the company. I’m now a Director on the gallery’s Sales Team.

GL: That’s amazing. I remember when I started working at the gallery there were only three people at Zwirner & Wirth, including myself, and only a handful of people working at the Chelsea outpost. It’s changed quite a bit in the 17 years I’ve been here. I went from working the front desk and as a gallery manager for years to making my way into sales and artist management.

New York: 20th Street

HOW IS ZWIRNER STRUCTURED?  THE GALLERY HAS VENUES VIRTUALLY ALL OVER THE WORLD, NEW YORK, LONDON, HONG KONG, AND NOW A BEAUTIFUL NEW SPACE IN PARIS.  ARE EACH OF THE GALLERIES AUTONOMOUS IN TERMS OF EXHIBITION SCHEDULES AND CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS OR, IN THIS GLOBAL MARKET, IS THE PLANNING FOR ALL THE ZWIRNER GALLERIES WORLDWIDE HANDLED BY A SPECIAL TEAM?

VA: The way it’s structured, it’s still very much driven by David Zwirner as the owner and main strategist of the gallery. However, he has eight partners that have a lot of influence in making decisions on artist management and exhibition schedules. New York is the hub, but we all connect on a weekly basis. Our decisions are made as a team.

GL: Although each of our galleries around the world have distinct qualities unique to that physical location and city, the larger gallery operates collectively – as one company. For example, certain operational decisions are specific to doing business in London versus Hong Kong, and largely those decisions are made by our teams in those locations. However, the majority of decisions we make are coordinated across all locations, be that client outreach, exhibition planning, research, communications, inventory, shipping.  But, as Veronique noted, one aspect that adds to the success of the gallery is the fact that we operate in a team format. We make decisions as a team, and are stronger because of it.

IN NEW YORK, VERONIQUE AND GREG EXEMPLIFY THAT TEAM SPIRIT, TRAVELING BACK AND FORTH BETWEEN THE 19th AND 20th STREET GALLERIES WITH CLIENTS AND MUSEUM CURATORS  BOTH OFTEN WORKING IN TANDEM TO SHARE THEIR LOVE OF THE ARTISTS’ WORK AND THEIR DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THEIR PROCESS AND AESTHETIC WITH THE VISITORS TO THE GALLERIES. SOCIAL DISTANCING OR NOT, THE LRFA BLOG PREDICTS LINES AROUND THE BLOCK FOR THE KUSAMA EXHIBITIONS ARE NOT A THING OF THE PAST!

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, THEY WILL CONTINUE TO ADDRESS THE WORKINGS OF THE GALLERIES WITHIN THE UMBRELLA OF DAVID ZWIRNER WORLDWIDE. PLEASE JOIN US!