Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

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Tag: Pierre Huyghe

Airport, please! the LRFA blog heads to Norway, to Pierre Huyghe’s mysterious installation at Kistofos

Pierre Huyghe
Second Law
Kistefos, Norway
Pierre Huyghe, Second Law, 2021. Scanned forest, real-time simulation, generative mutations and sounds, intelligent camera, environmental sensors, animals, plants, micro-organisms and materialized mutations: synthetic and biological material aggregate © Pierre Huyghe. Courtesy of the artist; Hauser & Wirth, London; Kistefos. 3D

 

‘Second Law’ has emerged and will be on view at Kistefos museum this coming summer. ‘Second Law’ is an entity, a milieu, both physical and digital, permeable, continuously shaped by flood waters and modified by what it perceives. It is simultaneously an island and the possibility of what this island could be under alternate conditions of reality. As the world changes according to the mutations of covid, it is fascinating to follow this highly intelligent artist/scientist into a world of his creation. The LRFA blog flies to Oslo, Norway to the forest of Kistefos to see his predictions of our brave new world. Please join me.

The entire site has been scanned, down to its details, and digitized. In the simulated environment, unbound from physical limitations, algorithmic and biological agents intelligences cooperate. A fiction based set of rules is played out by learning machines that continually generate mutations of existing features, such as trees, trash, animals or humans. The mutations change behaviours in real time according to external factors, accelerating their growth with the flood water, and transforming over the years. At times they randomly exit the simulation to manifest themselves physically on the actual island. They sustain or decompose, modifying the island’s appearance and progressively contaminate the existing reality with another possibility of itself. At the far end of the forest stands a screen where an autonomous eye navigates the simulated environment, witnessing its ever-changing nature.

KISTEFOS , NORWAY

Kistefos is located one hour north-west of Oslo. There are two entrances to the park with parking on both sides. People with reduced mobility are asked to arrive from Entrance South.

 

 

PIERRE HUYGHE :  BIOLOGY AD ARCHAEOLOGY OUT OF TIME

Pierre Huyghe, De-extinction, , Film, 19 min, 2014

It is an aquarium. It is an artwork. It is an aquarium. It is an artwork. It is an aquarium inside an artwork. It is an artwork inside an artwork. It is a “creation” in the true sense of the word.

Pierre Huyghe’s aquariums in Hauser & Wirth (13 September – 1 November 2014, London) are live ecosystems enclosed by the artist in glass cubes. Huyghe has installed aquariums, among other places, at the Marian Goodman Gallery in New York in 2011 and more recently, in 2013, at the Centre Pompidou, Paris. Since 2005, he has been interested in biology and organism self-development, like in 2008, when he transformed, for a 24-hour period, the Sydney Opera House into a fog-filled arboretum, or in 2010, when he planted a calendar’s worth of flora in Madrid’s Crystal Palace for Reina Sofia, representing different seasons and holidays throughout the year and then letting them battle for ground rights. He stood out in dOCUMENTA XIII (Kassel, 2012), remarking his interest with “presence”, composing in a park an installation that included a real painted dog, a beehive-headed sculpture (with bees, of course), marijuana and poisonous fruits, left to their destiny without any control.

Pierre Huyghe Nympheas Transplant

The biotopes[1] of IN. BORDER. DEEP at Hauser & Wirth, despite their life-independence, have a narrative within. They have been, in fact, transplanted from Monet’s ponds in his garden in Giverny, the one represented in his famous “Nymphéas” paintings. Fabulously, Huyghe’s research went deep into the origin of his living organisms, so that the lighting sequence in the vitrines is programmed according to the variations of the weather in Giverny (speeded and alternated) during the shortest day in 1914, the autumn of 1917 and the entire period from 1914 and 1918, when Monet was there. The audience is witness of events suspended in time. Are the ecosystems mirrors of the past or are they developing in an uncertain future?

PIERRE HUYGHE AT THE MET

It’s always interesting to see how an artist’s ideas can fall flat in one medium but resound in another. Whether due to an uneven mastery of craft or to the particular nature of his efforts of late, French artist Pierre Huyghe is having just this kind of moment with two works recently on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Pierre Huyghe                       Untitled (human mask)

Huyghe has long investigated the ways in which nature and humanity both consort with and conspire against one another, and his latest projects — a video and a rooftop installation — are no exception. The difference is that one of these works is terrifically compelling, while the other isn’t in the slightest.

Huyghe shot his video Untitled (Human Mask) in Fukushima, Japan, in 2014, three years after a tsunami touched off the world’s largest nuclear meltdown since Chernobyl. The piece opens with images of the city’s gutted buildings and decimated streets, then quickly cuts to the quiet of an abandoned sake house where we observe a solitary monkey, masked, wigged, and dressed to look like a young girl. For nearly nineteen minutes, we watch the primate sitting, waiting, pacing the confined, creepy space, our eye continually redirected to the visual disruptions between animal body and human costume.

Huyghe isn’t rethinking audience pathos and the performing animal. This isn’t Bresson’s Au Hasard Balthazar — or even Hollywood’s Doctor Dolittle — but the work’s twisted achievement is the way in which it undermines the emotional expressiveness audiences typically project onto cine-creatures. The monkey’s expressionless white mask and prim uniform disconnect a viewer somewhat from the depressing spectacle of her domestication. Is she happy? Is she sad? Who can tell? Huyghe doesn’t seem at all interested in probing the depths of human barbarity in this case. Rather, his camera remains shortsighted, enamored only with the monkey’s uncanny presence.

If catastrophe teaches one lesson, it’s that time is never on our side. Although the moving image has always shadowboxed this inevitable blow, Huyghe unfortunately taps none of the power of video to develop his ideas and images via their duration. What Untitled (Human Mask) ultimately reveals is standard-issue art world trauma laundering — an act of apocalypse chic. He reduces the whole of the Fukushima disaster to a few short establishing shots, adrenalized by a twitchy editing style and a fashionably cacophonous soundtrack: a soupçon of atrocity tourism to whet a viewer’s palate with the illusion of gravitas

Pierre Huyghe at the Met
Installation, February 11,2022

By contrast, Huyghe’s smart, subtle installation on the Met’s rooftop garden is nothing if not alert to time as the great coconspirator. Here he plays at excavating the primal landscape of the island of Manhattan, removing certain of the Met’s heavy granite roof tiles to create miniature topographies of native stones, thin streams of water, and sprouts of indigenous plants. A sizable piece of schist sits at one end of the roof, while a chunk of lava floats in an aquarium at the other. Swimming inside the tank are a lamprey eel and a few tadpole shrimp, ancient creatures unchanged by evolution’s push forward.

The tank drips into the artist’s manmade landscapes, watering the flora that’s doomed to be pulled sooner or later from its temporary place. Artificial ecosystems always manage to serve as unsettling metaphors for “growth to nowhere,” and this may be Huyghe’s sharpest move of all.

Look up and west from the museum’s roof to gaze over the treetops of Central Park. To the east you’ll see a grand apartment building encased in scaffolding, its restoration under way. To the south, behold the gross overgrowth of the midtown skyline, now dominated by 432 Park Avenue, a Kafkaesque malignancy that promises New Yorkers “the grand experience of estate living — in the sky.” For the moment it’s the tallest building in the neighborhood, but will soon be bested by two others concurrently going up along the same corridor.

This too, you may remind yourself as you look from Huyghe’s weird and witty return to Eden, is all just future rubble.

Met installation
Pierre Huyghe

https://www.villagevoice.com/2015/08/18/the-met-doubles-down-on-pierre-huyghe/

https://observer.com/2015/05/pierre-huyghe-on-why-he-chose-to-dig-up-the-mets-roof-garden/

As we create new worlds, new habits and new ecosystems, post-pandemic, Pierre Huyghe’s haunting installations open the door to a multitude of possibilities.

Artists and the creative process with Kate Abrams at Hauser and Wirth

John Baldessari in his studio

IN A WONDERFUL COLLECTION OF ESSAYS ENTITLED THE POWER OF MYTH, JOSEPH CAMPBELL SPEAKS OF “THE SACRED SPACE”.

To have a sacred place is an absolute necessity for anybody today. You must have a room or a certain hour of the day or so, where you do not know who your friends are, you don’t know what you owe anybody or what they owe you. This is a place where you can simply experience and bring forth what you are and what you might be.”

FOR AN ARTIST, THE SACRED SPACE IS THE STUDIO. IT IS A PLACE OF IDEAS, MATERIALS. CREATIVITY AND REALIZATION. FOR ARTISTS OF THE CALIBER OF THOSE REPRESENTED BY SUCH GALLERIES AS MARIAN GOODMAN AND BARBARA GLADSTONE, THE STUDIO, ITS FORM AND FUNCTION,  PROVIDES A BETTER UNDERSTANDING  BOTH OF THE PROCESS AND OF THE WORK ITSELF.

Lawrence Weiner in his studio

TODAY, KATE ABRAMS, A DIRECTOR AT HAUSER AND WIRTH, RECALLS HER EXPERIENCE AS AN ASSISTANT TO THE GALLERY DIRECTORS AT MARIAN GOODMAN AND HER OPPORTUNITY TO VISIT ARTISTS’ STUDIOS AND BE INVOLVED IN THEIR WORK.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE PRIMARY RECOMMENDATIONS YOU HAVE FOR SOMEONE INTERESTED IN A CAREER IN THE ARTS, SPECIFICALLY IN THE GALLERY WORLD?

See everything! Don’t be afraid to have an opinion. Internships help also.

THE ROSTER OF ARTISTS AT MARIAN GOODMAN GALLERY IS IMPRESSIVE AND INCLUDES OROZO, JULIE MEHRETU, JOHN BALDESSARI, LAWRENCE WEINER AND THE ESTATE OF FRANCESCA WOODMAN. WHICH OF THE ARTISTS’ WORK WAS THE MOST COMPELLING AND WHO CONTRIBUTED THE MOST SIGNIFICANTLY TO YOUR UNDERSTANDING AND APPRECIATION OF GREAT CONTEMPORARY ART?

Marian has an amazing program. It’s hard to understate the importance of John Baldessari or Lawrence Weiner. It was really fun to interact with both of them and their studios, to understand their whole process better. They are both making new work but you also get to interact with these historical pieces which put the new work into context. And then there’s the younger generation of artists, who are making work that will one day be those historical pieces. Julie Mehretu, Danh Vo, or Adrian Villar Rojas for example. It was so exciting to see them all have big moments at the gallery while I was there.

Julie Mehretu
Marian Goodman Gallery exhibition
Liminal Squared 2013

WHICH ARTISTS DID YOU WORK WITH SPECIFICALLY AND WHAT WERE YOUR RESPONSBILITIES? WHAT WERE THE MOST INTERESTING AND CHALLENGING ASPECTS?

I assisted the directors who worked with Julie Mehretu, John Baldessari, Lawrence Weiner, Gabriel Orozco, the Francesco Woodman Estate, and a few others. I was fortunate that both of my bosses gave me a lot of freedom to interact with the artists and their studios, so even though it was an assistant role, I was able to develop those relationships. Seeing an exhibition come to fruition by artists that we worked with was always very rewarding. Also working with the artists on specific projects – for instance publishing a catalogue for the Mehretu show, or helping to organize an Orozco show at MOT Tokyo.

Gabriel Orozco exhibition
Museum of Modern Art

The other large component of my job was sales assistance. We have to sustain the artists’ projects somehow! I definitely developed an interest in it. This was my first foray into sales strategies and client interfacing, so I made sure to pay attention.

DO YOU HAVE ANY CURATORIAL ASPIRATIONS? ARE THERE ARTISTS WHOSE SHOWS YOU WOULD LIKE TO CURATE, AND WHY?

I do, but not in a very formal way. I think those opportunities will come about organically through my relationships with artists and connections that I notice between them. Curating is not my job, so I don’t have the luxury to spend much time trying to conceptualize exhibitions. But when I do see something that I love or connect with, I take note and save it my back pocket of ideas. For now, I really enjoy having a dialogue with the artists that we represent and seeing how those conversations manifest into their work.

Zoe Leonard
In the Wake
Hauser & Wirth exhibition 2016

WHEN DID YOU START AT HAUSER & WIRTH AND WHAT ARE YOUR CURRENT RESPONSBILITIES?

I started in May 2015. Sometimes it feels like I have been there forever and sometimes like I just started! I am an Associate Director; I work closely with one Director and provide support for his sales activities, as well as develop my own. Together we also manage several artists  – Zoe Leonard, Pierre Huyghe, and Richard Jackson are a few.

Pierre Huyghe
Roof Garden
Metropolitan Museum of Art

IN OUR NEXT LRFA POST, KATE WILL BRING US UP TO DATE ON THE HISTORY AND GALLERIES THAT COMPRISE HAUSER AND WIRTH. FOR AN INSIDER’S VIEW, PLEASE JOIN US!

 

Welcome to Dallas! with Turon Travel expert, Nicholas Christopher

Dallas Arts District
Master Plan

DALLAS, FOUNDED AND NAMED BY JOHN NEELY BRYAN IN 1841, BEGAN AS A PERMANENT SETTLEMENT NEAR THE TRINITY RIVER AND ROSE TO HISTORICAL PROMINENCE AS THE GATEWAY CITY FOR THE OIL AND COTTON INDUSTRIES. TODAY, DALLAS IS HOME TO A COMMUNITY OF GENEROUS AND DEDICATED ART COLLECTORS AND PATRONS WHO SUPPORT THEIR CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS AND MUSEUMS WITH A GENEROSITY AS BIG AS THE STATE ITSELF.

THOSE ATTENDING THE DALLAS ART FAIR, APRIL 6th (PREVIEW) THROUGH APRIL 12th, ARE SURE TO ENJOY A WARM WELCOME. THE CITY OF DALLAS FEATURES THE LARGEST CONTIGUOUS URBAN ARTS DISTRICT IN THE UNITED STATES AND INCLUDES FIVE CULTURAL CENTERS DESIGNED BY INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED ARCHITECTS  I.M. PEI, RENZO PIANO AND NORMAN FOSTER AND REM KOOLHAAS.

DALLAS IS A GREAT DESTINATION ANY TIME OF YEAR AND THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO WELCOME TRAVEL EXPERT, NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER, FOUNDER AND PRINCIPAL OF TURON TRAVEL, THE TRAVEL AGENCY TO THE ART WORLD, AS OUR GUIDE. THANK YOU, NICHOLAS!

https://www.turontravel.com/about-us

The 2017 Dallas Art Fair is enjoying its 9th year.  This annual art event anchors the Dallas Art District, the largest arts district in the nation, spanning 68 acres and 19 contiguous blocks. The district is comprised of museums, performance halls, corporate offices, residences, restaurants, churches and even a school. The Dallas Art District has been a thirty-year plan in the making and now boast buildings by four Pritzker Prize winning architects within a span of several blocks and also includes significant buildings from as far back as the late 1880s, just 40 years after Dallas was founded.

The 2017 DALLAS ART FAIR, opening on Thursday April 6th and continuing through Sunday, the 9th, will feature prominent national and international art dealers and galleries exhibiting painting, sculpture, works on paper, photography, video, and installation by modern and contemporary artists. As with all successful fairs, Dallas’ arts institutes, galleries and museums put forth new and exciting exhibitions to complement the mission of the fair.

Dallas Art Fair
Preview Gala 2016

This makes for a full week around the Dallas Art Fair with the annual Preview Gala Benefit setting the stage. The Preview Gala benefits the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center and Dallas Contemporary, and will offer art patrons and Dallas’ top collectors the opportunity to preview and purchase exhibited works prior to the public opening of the fair.

The Dallas Art Fair venue is conveniently set in a private park located across from the Dallas Museum of Art and the Nasher Sculpture Center.

http://dallasartfair.com/visiting-the-fair/

https://www.dma.org/visit

The Dallas Museum of Art’s collection contains over 24,000 works of art from all cultures and time periods spanning 5,000 years of human creativity. The collection is dynamic; new acquisitions are being added all the time and the galleries are constantly changing. A particularly compelling current DMA exhibition for those attending the Art Fair is entitled Passages in Modern Art: 1946–1996.

Jasper Johns
Device
1961-1962

Taken from the DMA’s acclaimed contemporary collection, this exhibit is a great indicator of the dedication and support of the Dallas art community and includes recent acquisitions, rarely seen works, and newly conserved paintings and sculpture. Art by such iconic artists as Bernd and Hilla Becher, Philip Guston, Jasper Johns, Yayoi Kusama, and Mark Rothko is presented alongside their lesser-known contemporaries.

Yayoi Kusama
Accumulation
1962-1964

https://www.dma.org/art/exhibitions/passages-modern-art-1946-1996

Nasher Sculpture Center by Renzo Piano

The birth and growth of the Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection started more than 50 years ago. In 1950, the Nashers traveled to Mexico, where they became interested in pre-Columbian art and bought the first works in what would become a sizable collection of objects from ancient Latin America. They soon bought other ethnographic and archaeological works and also acquired a number of important American modernist paintings and prints. Mr. Nasher often credits this early involvement with pre-Columbian and other tribal arts as having whetted the Nashers’ appetite for, and appreciation of, modern three-dimensional works.

Henry Moore
Piece no. 3: Vertebrae 1968
Nasher Sculpture Center

By the late-1960s, the Nashers had made their first significant acquisitions of modern sculpture. These included Jean Arp’s Torso with Buds (1961), two major bronzes by Henry Moore, Three Piece No. 3: Vertebrae (1968) and Two Piece Reclining Figure No.9 (1968, no longer in the Collection), and Barbara Hepworth’s large and powerful Squares with Two Circles (Monolith) (1963, cast 1964). In rapid succession, they went on to acquire works by, among others, Joan Miró, Alexander Calder and Isamu Noguchi.

Pierre Huyghe
La déraison, 2014
Concrete, marble, heating system, water, and plants, 36 ¼ x 97 ¾ x 51 in.

At the Nasher, don’t miss the remarkable installation of two works by Pierre Huyghe, 2017 Nasher Prize Laureate. Huyghe has profoundly expanded the parameters of sculpture through artworks encompassing a variety of materials and disciplines. As part of the celebrations surrounding Nasher Prize, the Nasher Sculpture Center presents two important works by the artist: an active marine ecosystem and a living sculpture.

 

Pierre Huyghe
Untitled, 2013
Live marine ecosystem, aquarium, resin shell

The Arts District is home to many other Arts Institutions all within walking distant of the fair.  There is the Fashion Industry Gallery which also houses the Dallas Art Fair,  along with The Annette Strauss Artist Square, the Belo Mansion/Dallas Bar Association, Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, Dallas Black Dance Theatre, Dallas Symphony Orchestra, Dallas Theater Center/Arts District Theater, Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, and the Trammell & Margaret Crow Collection of Asian Art.  Plenty to see and do during your stay in Dallas.

JOIN US FOR THE NEXT LRFA POST WITH NICHOLAS TO VISIT OTHER ART EXHIBITIONS AND HAVE A DELICIOUS BITE OR TWO ALONG THE WAY!