Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

INTERNATIONAL ART ADVISORY SERVICE

Tag: Tate Modern

The LRFA blog welcomes Meg Malloy, partner at Sikkema Jenkins & Co. gallery

Meg Malloy
Partner
Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO. ENJOYS A LONG AND RESPECTED HISTORY IN THE CONTEMPORARY ART WORLD FOR DISCOVERING EMERGING ARTISTS WHO GO ON TO GAIN GREAT CRITICAL AND COMMERCIAL SUCCESS AND SUPPORTING ESTABLISHED CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS WHOSE CAREERS THEY NURTURE. LOCATED AT 530 WEST 22nd STREET IN THE WEST CHELSEA ARTS DISTRICT IN NEW YORK CITY, THE GALLERY WAS FOUNDED IN 1991 BY BRENT SIKKEMA AS WOOSTER GARDENS. BRENT SIKKEMA BEGAN HIS GALLERY WORK IN 1971 AT THE DIRECTOR OF EXHIBITIONS AT THE VISUAL STUDIES WORKSHOP IN ROCHESTER, NEW YORK. HE OPENED HIS FIRST GALLERY IN BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, IN 1976. MICHAEL JENKINS, WHO HAD WORKED ON PROJECTS WITH THE GALLERY SINCE ITS OPENING IN 1991, JOINED AS DIRECTOR IN 1996, AND BECAME A PARTNER IN 2003.

Sikkema Jenkins Gallery
530 West 22nd Street
Chelsea, New York

SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO. WAS ORIGINALLY LOCATED ON WOOSTER STREET IN SoHo AND IN 1999 MOVED TO ITS PRESENT CHELSEA LOCATION SUBSEQUENTLY UNDERGOING EXTENSIVE RENOVATION AND EXPANSION.  THE GALLERY IS AN EXTREMELY INVITING ENVIRONMENT, WITH A DEDICATED AND ACCESSIBLE STAFF EAGER TO EDUCATE AS WELL AS TO PLACE WORKS.

MEG MALLOY, A PARTNER AT SIKKEMA JENKINS, IS THE PERFECT REPRESENTATIVE OF THE OPEN UNPRETENTIOUS SPIRIT OF THE GALLERY AND THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO WELCOME HER TODAY.

MEG, THANK YOU, IN THIS BUSY SEASON OF THE ART YEAR, FOR YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO THE LRFA BLOG.

Vik Muniz: Surfaces
Current exhibition
Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

WHAT WERE YOUR EXPERIENCES GROWING UP THAT ENCOURAGED AN INTEREST IN ART?

I was born in Chicago and raised in Glencoe, a suburb north of the city. I am the oldest of six.   My mother had wanted to be an artist, and going to museums was a part of my childhood.  The Art Institute also had a great outreach program and before any school trip there, museum docents would come to school and educate us about what we might see.  My parents were involved in a local theater group and I took part in the youth version, always on the management side as a producer or v.p.-  never as a performer.    In high school and college, friends and I used to take the train to the city and to go the Art Institute.  We would just wander.  I was always struck by Georgia O’Keeffe’s Sky Above Clouds, which was installed at the top of a grand staircase at the museum: it seemed so majestic, and it motivated me to read her biography. I loved thinking about her work, and what sounded to me like an impossibly exciting life in art.

 

Georgia O’Keeffe
Sky Above Clouds

DID YOU PAINT OR HAVE AMBITIONS TO BECOME A PROFESSIONAL ARTIST?

 I never had any talent for art making, though  I enjoyed it.  I really thought I would go into publishing. I worked on the school newspapers in both junior high and high school.  One close friend did have parents who were collectors, and another had a mom who ran a gallery downtown.    

WHAT WAS YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND, AND HOW DID IT LEAD YOU INTO THE ART WORLD?

 I went to The University of Illinois at Champaign Urbana and studied Comp Lit.  

My plan was to follow my favorite aunt’s career path in publishing.   Because comp lit is interdisciplinary, we often looked at visual art. My interest in its history was piqued, and I added art history classes to my course of study.  I was a resident advisor and had a number of artists on my floor  – I  loved visiting their studios and talking about what they  were doing.

Kara Walker
Turbine Commission Tate Modern

Then  I took a museum studies class and decided I should go into museum education.   With that goal in mind, I decided to go to grad school in art history, and ended up at UC Berkeley. There I had a job at the art museum bookstore, and then became the intern for Connie Lewallen, a wonderful curator and human being.   She ran the Matrix program, which focused on one contemporary artist at a time in a frequently changing exhibition program, always with an accompanying brochure.  I loved the variety and the engagement with the artists and their ideas.  It was compelling.  I also became the de facto house sitter for the curators — all of whom had great contemporary art and libraries, and I loved being immersed in those environments.

Erin Shirreff
San Francisco Museum of Art

SO MANY INFLUENCES LEADING YOU TO NEW YORK AND A CAREER IN THE ARTS. IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, MEG WILL  DETAIL HER FIRST EXPERIENCES IN THE NEW YORK ART WORLD.

PLEASE JOIN US!

It’s always about the image, at the Yancey Richardson Gallery with director Matthew Whitworth

Laszlo Moholy-Nagy
K VII
Oil on canvas
Shape of Light at the Tate Modern
until October 14, 2018

CURRENTLY AT THE TATE MODERN, THE EXHIBITION SHAPE OF LIFE EXPLORES THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PHOTOGRAPHY AND ABSTRACT ACT, A SUBJECT FIRST ADDRESSED IN THE UK ON SUCH A MAJOR SCALE. THE BIRTH OF ABSTRACT ART AND THE INVENTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY WERE BOTH DEFINING MOMENTS IN OUR VISUAL HISTORY.  SPANNING THE CENTURY FROM THE 1920s TO THE PRESENT, THE SHOW BRINGS TO LIFE THE INNOVATION FOUND IN PHOTOGRAPHY AND ITS SHARED HISTORY WITH ABSTRACT ART. THANKS TO THIS EXHIBITION, WHICH CONTINUES THROUGH OCTOBER 2018, WE CAN TRACE THE DIALOGUE BETWEEN SUCH PHOTOGRAPHERS AS MAN RAY, ALFRED STIEGLITZ, JARED BARK AND MAYA ROCHAT.

Jared Bark
Untitled (JBARK PB 1973)
Vintage gelatin silver photobooth prints

IN ANTICIPATION OF THE TATE MODERN SHOW, THE APRIL/MAY SOLO EXHIBITION AT YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY IN NEW YORK FEATURED JARED BARK’S AMAZING PHOTOBOOTH PIECES COMPRISED OF UNIQUE VINTAGE PHOTO BOOTH ASSEMBLAGES THAT FORM ABSTRACT IMAGES. MINIMALISM IN GENERAL AND THE WORK OF SOL LEWITT IN PARTICULAR IMPACT ON BARK’S PHOTOGRAPHY, A PERFECT EXAMPLE OF THE DIALOGUE BETWEEN ABSTRACTION IN PAINTING AND IN PHOTOGRAPHY.

YANCEY RICHARDSON OPENED IN SOHO IN 1995 AND MOVED TO CHELSEA IN 2000. CURRENTLY LOCATED IN A GREAT GROUND FLOOR EXHIBITION SPACE ON 22nd STREET, YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY IS ONE OF THE FIRST DEDICATED TO PHOTO-BASED ART.

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO CONTINUE ITS CONVERSATION WITH MATTHEW WHITWORTH, A DIRECTOR AT THE GALLERY.

http://www.yanceyrichardson.com/

Rachel Perry
Soundtrack to my Life
February – March 2018

HOW DO YOU SEE THE EVOLUTION OF THE GALLERY IN PARTICULAR AND THE PHOTOGRAPHY MARKET IN GENERAL SINCE YOU HAVE BEEN THE DIRECTOR AND SINCE YOU HAVE BEEN IN THE ART WORLD?

 With the gallery’s move 4 years ago to a ground-floor space on the same block, I can’t help but think that we’re seen as a more of an equal to the larger galleries showing painting, sculpture, and other works on paper. It levels the playing field a bit, as far as attendance for sure, to be able to be seen from the sidewalk. With that being said, along with a forward thinking program, we’ve developed quite a few new relationships with collectors who had never purchased a photograph or walked into a “photography gallery” before. That cross pollination can also be seen in the mixed-media art fairs we participate in, where we tend to do quite a bit better sales wise than at the photography specific ones. This has certainly changed since I started so many years ago when, if you wanted a specific piece by an artist, you knew there was probably only one place you could get it.

Bryan Graf
Field Recording (Sun Room)
Unique chromogenic print

HOW HAS TECHNOLOGY AFFECTED THE NATURE OF PHOTOGRAPHY?

One thing I’ve noticed is that the artists that use digital technology, don’t seem to be trying to make it as good as or just like analog anymore. Digital photography and printmaking have crossed into their own realm, where it’s OK to be digital and use the technology to its own end. Funny, though — now there’s been a return to analog with younger artists. It’s hip to use film and listen to vinyl records.

Gregory Crewdson
The Haircut, 2014
from the series Cathedral of the Pines

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE TECHNICAL ADVANCES THAT PHOTOGRAPHERS ARE EXPERIMENTING WITH THAT CHANGE THE IDEA OF WHAT A PHOTOGRAPH SHOULD BE?

Speaking to my previous point a bit more, I like to refer back to Gregory Crewdson’s last show at Gagosian. While I had mixed thoughts on the subject matter, I thought the printmaking and technical aspects of the work were so new and curious. They really were their own “thing.”

David Maisel
Terminal Mirage 22
Archival pigment printIN WHAT WAYS HAS THE ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY REMAINED THE SAME?

It’s always going to be about the image and it’s underlying strength.

DO YOU AGREE THAT PHOTOGRAPHY HAS TAKEN A TREMENDOUS LEAP FORWARD AS AN ESTABLISHED ART FORM AND AN AREA TO COLLECT?

Yes, absolutely. It used to be achieved by scale. Take the photographs of Andreas Gursky and Jeff Wall. There had never been prints that big before. Were we seduced by their imagery or their size? Today, more importantly, I see artists using photography to expand, and in some cases clarify, their voice. For example Mickalene Thomas. She may be best known for her bedazzled paintings taking on classical male artists’ views of women, but she broke out of an earlier rut in her practice by picking up a camera. She continues to make new photographic work today.

Mickalene Thomas

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, MATTHEW WILL PROFILE THE CURRENT COLLECTOR BASE AND EXPLORE PHOTOGRAPHY’S EARLIER INFLUENCES.

STAY TUNED!

 

Tis the season! Art books for everyone on your list.

SONIA DELAUNAY 2015 Retrospective Tate Museum, London

SONIA DELAUNAY
2015 Retrospective
Tate Museum, London

AS WE BOLT THROUGH THE DAYS, PARTICULARLY AT THIS TIME OF YEAR, GARNERING NEWS, INFORMATION AND UPDATES FROM OUR PHONES AND LAPTOPS, IT IS A RARE DELIGHT TO SIT AND LEAF THROUGH A BEAUTIFULLY BOUND AND RICHLY ILLUSTRATED ART BOOK ENJOYING THE IMAGES OF THE WORKS AND ABSORBING THE BIOGRAPHICAL AND AESTHETIC SUBSTANCE OF AN ARTIST’S LIFE. IRONICALLY, JUST AS I AM PLANNING TO POST DOUG FLAMM OF URSUS BOOKS’ EXCEPTIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR HOLIDAY GIFT-GIVING, I HAD THAT EXPERIENCE AND INTEND TO REPLICATE IT BACK HERE AT HOME. JUST YESTERDAY, I WAS SITTING IN A CLIENT’S NEW APARTMENT INSTALLING SOME FIRST-TIER ART FROM THEIR COLLECTION INTO THEIR NEW FLORIDA RESIDENCE. THE ART HANDLER TEAM AND I WERE WAITING FOR THEIR ARRIVAL TO SEE WHAT WE HAD ACCOMPLISHED AND I HAD THE UNEXPECTED GUILTY PLEASURE OF QUIETLY SITTING IN THEIR LIVING ROOM LOOKING THROUGH MONOGRAPHS ON ARTISTS IN THEIR COLLECTION.

THIS IS THE SEASON TO SHARE HOLIDAY SPIRIT AND JOY – AND THE WONDERFUL SENSE OF ENRICHMENT THAT BEAUTIFUL BOOKS AND ART CAN PROVIDE.

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NO ONE IS AS DEVOTED AND KNOWLEDGEABLE ABOUT THE WORLD OF BOOKS AS DOUG FLAMM AT URSUS BOOKS, 699 MADISON AVENUE (62nd STREET) IN NEW YORK. ESTABLISHED IN 1972, URSUS PROVIDES AN EXCEPTIONAL SELECTION OF ART REFERENCE BOOKS AS WELL AS RARE BOOKS IN ALL FIELDS AND SERVES CLIENTS IN NEW YORK AND THROUGHOUT THE WORLD OFFERING BOTH NEW AND OUT-OF-PRINT BOOKS INCLUDING CATALOGUE RAISONNES, MONOGRAPHS AND MUSEUM EXHIBITION CATALOGUES. http://www.ursusbooks.com/

HERE ARE A FEW RECOMMENDATIONS FROM DOUG OF CATALOGUES PUBLISHED IN CONJUNCTION WITH RECENT EXHIBITIONS AND EVENTS.

Propeller (Air Pavilion), 1937. Skissernas Museum, Lund, Sweden. © Pracusa 2014083. Photo: Emma Krantz

Propeller (Air Pavilion), 1937. Skissernas Museum, Lund, Sweden. © Pracusa 2014083. Photo: Emma Krantz

SONIA DELAUNAY AT THE TATE MODERN IN LONDON: A recent retrospective of Sonia Delaunay, a passionate woman and avant-garde artist who transcended languages, styles, disciplines and borders.

1. Montfort, Anne. SONIA DELAUNAY. 288 pages, including 250 color and b&w plates. wraps. London, Tate Publishing, 2015. (#160780) $49.95

To celebrate the genius of this Ukrainian artist, London’s Tate Modern has organized a retrospective exhibition on view until August 9, 2015, focusing on her prolific production during more than six decades. Born Sara Elievna Stern, in Odessa, Ukraine, at an early age she was sent to St. Petersburg, Russia, to live with her maternal uncle. Under harsh economic distress, her parents couldn’t provide the girl with a proper upbringing at home. She received an excellent education under the tutelage of her adoptive family, and her uncle instilled in her the passion for the visual arts. Over time, the girl—who adopted her mother´s maiden name to become Sonia Terk—would consider herself a Russian artist. In 1906, she settled in Paris, where she joined the intellectual, artistic circles, fraternizing with the likes of Braque, Picasso, Derain, and Vlaminck. Her paintings from that time show an apparent preference for the German expressionists and painters like Van Gogh and Gauguin. 

L) Electric Prisms, 1914. Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris (RMN). © Pracusa 2014083 (R) Simultaneous Dresses (The three women), 1925. Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid. © Pracusa 2014083.

L) Electric Prisms, 1914. Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris (RMN). © Pracusa 2014083
(R) Simultaneous Dresses (The three women), 1925. Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid. © Pracusa 2014083.

In 1910, Sonia divorced her first husband to marry Delaunay. Together they created one of the most influential abstract art movements of the early 20th century, called Simultanism. The movement, driven by the couple, claimed color was the expressive paradigm that stops the communicative limitations of the form in favor of contrasting and complementary chromatic expressions. The simultaneous coexistence of sensations created by colors was the fundamental precept of the Delaunays particular styles, which later influenced the poetics of Orphism.

Sonia Delaunay and two friends in Robert Delaunay’s studio, rue des Grands-Augustins, Paris 1924. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.

Sonia Delaunay and two friends in Robert Delaunay’s studio, rue des Grands-Augustins, Paris 1924. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.

The artist developed her vision—over decades—not only in painting, but also in fashion and custom design, interior and set decoration, magazines covers, and pictorial representations of abstract poems by Blaise Cendrars, among other authors. Between 1915 and 1930, the couple lived in Spain, Portugal, and France. In these countries, Sonia opened shops and ateliers such as Casa Sonia in Madrid (1918), and her boutique at Paris’ Boulevard Malesherbes. Her artistic establishments received great enthusiasm and praise from the aristocracy of Europe’s major capitals. 

WILLIAM KENTRIDGE

William Kentridge The Lulu Plays

William Kentridge
The Lulu Plays

William Kentridge was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 1955. He attended the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (1973–76), Johannesburg Art Foundation (1976–78), and studied mime and theater at L’École Internationale de Théâtre Jacques Lecoq, Paris (1981–82). Having witnessed first-hand one of the twentieth century’s most contentious struggles—the dissolution of apartheid—Kentridge brings the ambiguity and subtlety of personal experience to public subjects that are most often framed in narrowly defined terms. Using film, drawing, sculpture, animation, and performance, he transmutes sobering political events into powerful poetic allegories. In a now-signature technique, Kentridge photographs his charcoal drawings and paper collages over time, recording scenes as they evolve. Working without a script or storyboard, he plots out each animated film, preserving every addition and erasure. Aware of myriad ways in which we construct the world by looking, Kentridge uses stereoscopic viewers and creates optical illusions with anamorphic projection, to extend his drawings-in-time into three dimensions.

William Kentridge The Lulu Plays

William Kentridge
The Lulu Plays

Kentridge has had major exhibitions at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2009); Philadelphia Museum of Art (2008); Moderna Museet, Stockholm, (2007); and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2004); among others. He has also participated in Prospect.1 New Orleans (2008); the Sydney Biennale (1996, 2008); and Documenta (1997, 2002). His opera and theater works, often produced in collaboration with Handspring Puppet Company, have appeared at Brooklyn Academy of Music (2007); Standard Bank National Arts Festival, Grahamstown, South Africa (1992, 1996, 1998); and Festival d’Avignon, France (1995, 1996). His production of Dmitri Shostakovich’s opera, The Nose, premiered in 2010 at the Metropolitan Opera, New York, in conjunction with a retrospective organized by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Metropolitan Opera's LULU

Metropolitan Opera’s LULU

IN NOVEMBER 2015, THE METROPOLITAN OPERA PREMIERED KENTRIDGE’S PRODUCTION OF ALBAN BERG’S OPERA LULU, “A STORY FILLED WITH PSYCHOSEXUAL POLITICS OF GERMAN EXPRESSIONISM”. http://www.wsj.com/articles/lulu-review-william-kentridge-draws-death-and-despair-1447107798

When William Kentridge made his Metropolitan Opera debut with Shostakovich’s “The Nose” in 2010, the piece proved a perfect fit for the South African visual artist’s signature style. That brilliant production was a playful kaleidoscope of film, animated drawings and live action, its tone and spirit celebrating the joyful anarchy of both the wayward body part of the title and the score. Alban Berg’s coruscating 12-tone opera “Lulu,” which opened on Thursday, is a different kind of work, but Mr. Kentridge’s endlessly fertile imagination proved its equal as well, exploring its violent darkness and relentless descent into hell.

William Kentridge The Lulu Plays

William Kentridge
The Lulu Plays

KENTRIDGE, William. The Lulu Plays, by Frank Wedekind. 197 pp. Illustrated with 67 full-page reproductions of drawings by William Kentridge. Folio, bound in publisher’s cloth in matching slipcase, both designed by Kentridge. San Francisco: Arion Press,2015.


$2000.00An exciting new publication from the Arion Press featuring the work of one of today’s most sought-after artists. The text consists of the two plays which are the basis for the libretto of Alban Berg’s Lulu. The Metropolitan Opera will be presenting Kentridge’s production of Lulu which premiers on November 5th. Kentridge worked on the illustrations for the book between 2011 and 2015 and they were made to be used in the Met production by being projected onto the set. As is typical of much of Kentridge’s work there is a strong cinematic influence. Andrew Hoyem has accompanied Kentridge’s illustrations with bold typography in black and red, creating a strikingly modern book while at the same time rendering homage to the works of a century earlier. As new. One of an edition of 400 copies signed by the artist.

William Kentridge The Lulu Plays

William Kentridge
The Lulu Plays

URSUS BOOKS IS HAPPY TO SEARCH FOR BOOKS NOT CURRENTLY IN STOCK AND CREATES CUSTOMIZED LISTS FOR CLIENTS WHO ARE EXPANDING OR BUILDING THEIR COLLECTIONS. DOUG IS A DILIGENT DETECTIVE AND THE RESULTS ARE ALWAYS SPECTACULAR!

MORE RECOMMENDATIONS NEXT POST…THANKS FOR READING.