Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

INTERNATIONAL ART ADVISORY SERVICE

Estate planning should include one’s art collection!

 

 

TODAY’S LRFA POST CONTINUES ITS CONVERSATION  WITH RAMSAY SLUGG, MANAGING DIRECTOR AT U.S. TRUST WHOSE EXPERTISE ON TRUST AND ESTATE PLANNING IS HIGHLY REGARDED. IN TODAY’S HE INFORMS US  OF THE CONSEQUENCES OF FAILING TO PLAN FOR THE DISPOSITION OF ONE’S ART COLLECTION.

The failure to plan for the disposition of such collections can be costly on many fronts. In addition to federal income, estate, and gift tax considerations, the failure to plan means that the collection will end up with the estate’s personal representative, who often has little expertise in art and little, if any, direction for an appropriate disposition. These considerations may result in a grossly inequitable distribution of estate assets, perhaps to family members who do not share the collector’s passion, or an estate fire sale. The failure to plan most certainly will result in family discord and perhaps litigation. Finally, the failure to plan most assuredly will lead to a disposition different from what the collector would have wanted if he had taken the time to properly plan.

Part 2 of this article will focus on those planning options. At least four important matters, however—risk management, valuation, provenance, and liquidity—need to be addressed, regardless of the planning outcome.

Risk Management

For most, the decorative art and other collectibles they have around the house likely are adequately cov- ered by their homeowners insurance policies. But a significant collection calls for a more robust solution.

Risk management is first and foremost about putting into place safeguards to prevent damage to a collection. Preventing a claim for replacement or repair is preferable to filing a claim after the damage occurs.

Collectors should have a good grasp of the value of their collections and then engage an insurance specialist to determine the appropriate level and type of insurance needed. This can be as simple as coverage under a homeowners insurance policy or additional valuable items coverage that is separately scheduled from the homeowners policy.

For collections of greater value, the collector should engage an insurance professional who specializes in high net worth clients and who is able to provide not only an appropriate insurance policy but also risk- management practices concerning security, fire, and smoke damage prevention.

Accidental damage probably accounts for the highest volume of claims, followed by theft, fire, storm or water damage, and “lost/mysterious disappearance.” The chances of actually experiencing a claim can- not always be controlled, but certainly they can be mitigated by working with a risk-management specialist.

Accidental damage is much more likely to happen if the art is moved from one residence to another or loaned to museums. In these cases, experts again should be used to properly pack, handle, and transport valuable works of art.

 

Ramsay H. Slugg is a managing director and member of the National Wealth Planning Strategies group at U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management. He is a past chair of the Trust and Estate Division’s Charitable Planning and Organizations Group and current co-chair of the Art and Collectibles Committee of the Income and Transfer Tax Planning Group. He is the author of Handbook of Practical Planning for Art Collectors and Their Advisors, published by the Section.

Published in Probate and Property, Volume 30, Number 2, ©2016 by the American Bar Association.

Practical Planning for Art Collectors and Their Advisors, Part 1 The Ancillaries

RAMSEY SLUGG
Managing Director, US Trust

SUMMER IS A GOOD TIME TO TAKE CARE OF THE CHURLY CHORES THAT WE ARE TOO BUSY TO ADDRESS THE REST OF THE YEAR.  REPAINTING A BEDROOM, GIVING AWAY THINGS THAT ARE UNUSED OR NEVER WORN, AND ON A MORE SERIOUS NOTE, HANDLING THE PART OF ART COLLECTING THAT DOESN’T HAVE THE SAME THRILL AS THE APPRECIATION OF A WORK ACQUIRED SOME TIME AGO THAT CONTINUES TO BRING JOY OR THE EXCITEMENT OF THE MOST RECENT ADDITION.

THE MORE YOU COLLECT AND THE MORE VALUABLE THE HOLDINGS, HOWEVER, THE MORE IMPORTANT IS PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE OF YOUR ART COLLECTION.

TODAY, WE HAVE THE HONOR OF WELCOMING RAMSAY SLUGG TO THE LRFA BLOG TO DISCUSS ALL THE WAYS, ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES, OF THE ASSET MANAGEMENT OF YOUR ART COLLECTION.



Ramsay H. Slugg is a managing director and member of the National Wealth Planning Strategies group at U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management. He is a past chair of the Trust and Estate Division’s Charitable Planning and Organizations Group and current co-chair of the Art and Collectibles Committee of the Income and Transfer Tax Planning Group. He is the author of Handbook of Practical Planning for Art Collectors and Their Advisors, published by the Section.

Art is an asset of passion. Coupled with its unique financial characteristics, this makes art perhaps the most difficult asset to incorporate into an overall estate and financial plan.

This is the first of a two-part article based on the author’s book, Handbook of Practical Planning for Art Collectors and Their Advisors. Part 1 focuses on “The Ancillaries,” those matters that the serious collector should take into consideration regardless of the ultimate disposition of the collection. Part 2 will focus on planning for the ultimate disposition of the collection. Although this article focuses on art, most of the discussion applies to the broader world of collectibles, including coins, stamps, antiques, and collectible firearms.

For many collectors, not only is their art among the most valuable assets that they own, but also they are more passionate about it than they are about their stocks, bonds, real estate, and sometimes even the family business. They have spent considerable time, energy, and resources to develop their own art expertise and have built a collection according to their personal aesthetic tastes. Collecting art is far more than a weekend hobby or merely an activity of home decoration; collecting has become a passion.

Although collectors probably realize that there will be some sort of disposition of their art, they most often are focused on the passion of collecting, not disposing. When they do consider the ultimate disposition of their collection, they are often overwhelmed by the seemingly endless number of choices of what to do. When faced with so many perceived choices, human nature takes over and often results in the selection of the default planning option—doing nothing. And often, a collector’s advisor is not aware of the extent or value of his client’s collection, and planning consists of a simple, standard bequest of tangible personal property to the surviving spouse, or the children or other heirs, to divvy up as they agree.

NEXT WEEK, POST 2 OF THIS ARTICLE! START BY READING THIS AND THEN TAKE ACTION.

Published in Probate and Property, Volume 30, Number 2, ©2016 by the American Bar Association.

Aspen as an Art Hotspot – Who Knew? by Nicholas Christopher of Turon Travel

Wade Guyton,
Peter Fischli and David Weiss
Aspen Art Museum

Turon Travel is an international travel agency with a focus on the arts.  Turon  has the distinct pleasure of working with a growing number of International Art Fairs, Art and Antiques Fairs and special arts events. Our management style creates a seamless process which works to the benefit of the venue, the exhibitors and of course, the event patrons.

Today, Nicholas Christopher, founder and president of Turon Travel, takes us to what used to be, and still is, a luxury winter ski resort but now also a lively art hotspot year round.

Aspen Art Museum

Now in its 7th year, Art Aspen, August 3-6, hosts an exclusive group of 30 international dealers.  Aspen has always been known as an enclave of power collectors so a fair of this size fits the bill, following the ArtCrush (Aug 2-4), a series of events benefiting the Aspen Art Museum, the cornerstone of the local art scene.  From wine tastings to silent and public art auctions, sponsored by Sotheby’s,  ArtCrush culminates in a Gala Summer benefit which is the talk of the Summer season. Lawrence Weiner will be awarded the Aspen Award for his unique word-based conceptual artworks. 

Fischli & Weiss
Rat and Bear

For their part, the Aspen Art Museum has paired Wade Guyton with the collaborative duo Peter Fischli and David Weiss.  Together, the three form a hydra of non-traditional artists known for taking risks aesthetically and mechanically – Guyton by feeding unconventional canvases through inkjet printers and Fischli/Weiss by creating complex systems out of mundane objects. Their work will occupy the museum’s 6 galleries , the rooftop sculpture garden and the outdoor commons, a total emersion in contemporary work throughout this impressive building.

New York artist, Shinque Smith, is also on view Aspen is one of four cities chosen by the National Trust for Historic Preservation to be included in an informational booklet series.  Known primarily for its Victorian architecture, Aspen has been transformed over the last 30 years by mid-century architecture that takes advantage of the uniqueness of the city’s mountain surroundings.  For more information check out http://www.aspenmod.com 

While you’re there, stop by two leading galleries, known for their internationally renowned artists.

Jim Hodges
Tracing the Contours of the Day
Baldwin Gallery

BALDWIN GALLERY is showing the extraordinary work of Jim Hodges in an exhibit entitled “Tracing the contours of our days”. The show features a monumental figural work. Casterline Goodman will have a beautiful group of important Richard Serra drawings.

 

 

Richard Serra
Casterline Goodman Gallery

We do not live by Art alone. Here are a few of the best restaurants in town, a variety of cuisines, all worth a visit.

The Little Nell – the only 5* hotel with 5* restaurants has two award winners to choose from.  This Aspen hotel is a ten-minute walk from the John Denver Sanctuary, three miles from the Buttermilk Mountain Ski Area, and a 13-minute drive from Aspen-Pitkin County Airport.

Element 47

Element 47 – serving breakfast and dinner, Element 47 has received accolades from the Forbes Travel Guide, James Beard, wine Spectator to name a few.  All food sources are locally sourced, all natural and nitrate free ( for the meat eaters).

Ajax Tavern has a menu which has tavern like entries with the full local sourced, all natural fare.  Burgers and truffle fries never tasted so good in the clear Aspen air.  Food & Wine; The Culture Trip and  Esquire Magazine are just a few critics who have raved about it.

Mitsubishi Aspen

and

Matsuhisa – Located in a 120-year old Main Street Victorian house in downtown Aspen, Matsuhisa Aspen opened in 1998 as the first Matsuhisa location outside of Chef Nobu’s original Beverly Hills restaurant.  Chef Nobu’s new-style Japanese cuisine draws influence from his classical training in Tokyo and his life abroad in Peru, Argentina, and around the world, showcasing signature dishes such as Yellowtail Sashimi with Jalapeño, Black Cod Miso and White fish Tiradito.

Hickory House Ribs – Set up like a full service diner, this restaurant serves all day long and specializes in BBQ slow cooking.  Vegetarians can enjoy the breakfast options – but salad is the course of choice for the other 2 meals of the day.

 

 

 

On the Cutting Edge: Contemporary Print editions at Pace Prints

Pace Prints
IFPDA Fair
Park Avenue Armory

IN 2009, THE INTERNATIONAL FINE PRINT DEALERS ASSOCIATION ESTABLISHED A FOUNDATION TO INSPIRE AND SUSTAIN A KNOWLEDGE AND CONNOISSEURSHIP OF FINE PRINTS FOR  A NEW GENERATION OF COLLECTORS, CURATORS AND ARTISTS. THE ASSOCIATION ITSELF, IFPDA, A NON-PROFIT DEDICATED TO THE APPRECIATION OF PRINTS AS WORKS OF FINE ART, INCLUDES AN INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY OF DEALERS FROM OLD MASTER TO CONTEMPORARY AND PUBLISHERS OF INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS.  THE IFPDA FAIR, HELD ANNUALLY AT NEW YORK’S PARK AVENUE ARMORY, HAS LONG BEEN CELEBRATED FOR THE QUALITY OF ITS EXHIBITORS AND RANGE OF FIRST-TIER PRINTS.

Much like sculpture, a print is an original work of art that can exist as a multiple, rather than a copy of a work in another medium.

http://www.ifpda.org/about

How & Nosm at Pace Prints workshop

IT IS NO SURPRISE THAT PACE PRINTS WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS OF IPFDA. WITHOUT EXCEPTION, THE PRINTS EXHIBITED AND PUBLISHED AT PACE CHAMPION THE INNOVATIVE CREATIVITY THAT ARTISTS REALIZE WHEN COLLABORATING WITH A MASTER PRINTER AND EXPLORING WORKING THIS MEDIUM.

TODAY, IT IS A PLEASURE FOR THE LRFA BLOG TO CONTINUE OUR CONVERSATION WITH PACE PRINTS’ GALLERY DIRECTOR, JEFF BERGMAN, ON CURRENT EDITIONS AND ART FAIRS IN WHICH PACE PARTICIPATES.

http://paceprints.com/about

JEFF, WELCOME BACK!

WHO ARE SOME OF THE ARTISTS THAT HAVE RECENTLY BEEN INVITED TO PUBLISH EDITIONS WITH PACE? WHAT ARE THE CRITERIA OF THE GALLERY TO INVITE AN ARTIST TO PUBLISH?

In the last year we have worked with Chuck Close, Leonardo Drew, Daniel Heidkamp, Jenny Holzer, Kate Shepherd, Shahzia Sikander, James Turrell and Dan Walsh to name a few.  We hope the artists that come and work with us will feel that what they do in our shops will help them explore their practice in a new way.  There are no concrete criteria for our partnership with an artist.

Ryan McGuinness
Figure Drawings, 2014, installation view, Pace Prints, New York

WHAT IS THE CUSTOMARY SIZE OF AN EDITION? HOW ARE EDITIONS DISTRIBUTED?

There is no customary size for an edition.  Our editions rarely exceed 50 these days, though in the 70’s might have always been 100 or more.  We are the dealer for our publications in almost all instances so all the work flows from us.

THE ART FAIR HAS BECOME THE GREAT MARKETPLACE OF THE CURRENT ART WORLD. WHAT IS YOUR PERSPECTIVE ON THE EMERGENCE OF INTERNATIONAL ART FAIRS WITH RESPECT TO THE PRINT MARKET?

The global art fair market for prints follows the same path as it does for unique work.  It is important to our collectors and artists that we participate, and as a founding member of the IFPDA fair in NY, we will continue to stay involved locally.

Pace Prints
ADAA The Art Show, 2017
Installation view

WHAT FAIRS DO YOU PARTICIPATE IN?

Currently we participate in Art Basel Miami Beach, Art Basel Hong Kong, the ADAA Art Fair and the IFPDA Fair and often at Art Basel Switzerland.

 

JAMES TURRELL
Installation View
Pace Prints


ONE OF THE ARTISTS FOR WHOM I HAVE GREAT RESPECT IS JAMES TURRELL, RECENTLY HONORED WITH A RETROSPECTIVE OF HIS WORK AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM IN NEW YORK THAT WAS PRESENTED CONCURRENTLY AT THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART (LACMA) AND THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON. TURRELL WORKS DIRECTLY WITH LIGHT AND SPACE TO CHALLENGE THE VIEWER’S PERCEPTION BOTH OF HIMSELF AND HIS WORLD.

Pace Editions printers Bill Hall and Sarah Carpenter discuss printing James Turrell’s newest suite of aquatint etchings, which was exhibited for the first time at the IFPDA print fair, November 5-9, 2014.

 

http://www.paceprints.com/video/james-turrell-prints-and-process

HOW DID PACE PRINTS TRANSLATE THIS VISIONARY ARTIST INTO THE PRINT MEDIUM?

I think that the artist describes this best in this video (created by Pace Prints) about the print process when he says “it’s something to take the qualities of light and make a print editions…but I am quite well pleased”.

How & Nosm
Stacked prints
Pace Prints

PACE PRINTS IS ALSO A STRONGHOLD FOR ARTISTS SOUGHT AFTER BY ACTIVE “YOUNG COLLECTORS”.  WHO ARE SOME OF THE ARTISTS THAT HAVE GAINED A GREAT DEAL OF ATTENTION, BOTH AT AUCTION AND IN THE GALLERY SECTOR, THAT YOU HAVE RECENTLY PUBLISHED?

In November at the IFPDA our fair booth contained work by Chuck Close, Leonardo Drew, Jenny Holzer, KAWS, Shahzia Sikander and James Turrell.  This certainly covers the cross-section of artists you are talking about.

LEONARDO DREW
42P 2014
Pigmented handmade paper
Published by Pace Editions, Inc.

ANOTHER ARTIST WHOSE WORK HAS INTERESTED ME SINCE HE FIRST EXHIBITED AT SIKKEMA JENKINS IS LEONARDO DREW. THE MATERIALS IN HIS WORK ARE CHALLENGING: WOOD, RUSTED IRON, COTTON, PAPER, AND MUD. DREW, WHO GREW UP IN A PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECT, TRANSFORMS MEMORIES OF HIS CHILDHOOD SURROUNDINGS INTO INTENSE, ELABORATE AND OFTEN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELIEFS AND SCULPTURES.  HOW DID PACE TRANSLATE THESE PICTORIAL CONCERNS INTO PRINTS?

Our papermaking studio is a real laboratory where artists like Leonardo Drew have found a way to create sculptural dimensions while working with paper.  Ruth Lingen and Akemi Martin have used a number of papermaking techniques in collaboration with the artist, which he speaks about here:

http://www.paceprints.com/video/leonardo-drew-his-new-body-cast-paper-works

PLEASE JOIN US WHEN JEFF BERGMAN SHARES HIS PERSPECTIVE ON THE FUTURE OF THE PRINT MARKET IN THE NEXT LRFA BLOG.

 

IN THE MEANTIME, VISIT PACE PRINTS SUMMER EXHIBITIONS, “SELECTIONS”

32 East 57th Street

AL JENSEN
Alfred Jensen, “Portfolio, #1,” 1973, screenprint, 35 x 35 Inches, edition of 150

521 West 26th Street

Keith Haring
“USA 19-82,”
On exhibit Pace Prints Chelsea

Printmaking techniques: traditional and innovative with Jeff Bergman, Director of Pace Prints

Kenneth Noland, “Untitled,” 2009, Aquatint and soft-ground etching,
35 1/4 x 35 inches
ON VIEW SUMMER EXHIBITION
Pace Prints
32 East 57 Street

THE SPECTRUM OF PRINTMAKING TECHNIQUES SPANS A WIDE ARCH FROM THE TRADITIONAL TO THE INNOVATIVE. ETCHING, ENGRAVING, LITHOGRAPHY PRINTING PROCESSES HAVE EXPANDED EXPONENTIALLY THANKS TO TECHNOLOGY TO INCLUDE COMPUTER PRINTS, MYLAR LITHOGRAPHY, HELIO-RELIEFS AND MONOPRINTS. RATHER THAN SEEKING TO REPRODUCE ICONIC IMAGES OF ARTISTS’ PAINTINGS, PRINTMAKING IS AN ART FORM IN AND OF ITSELF. THE DIALOGUE BETWEEN MASTER PRINTER AND ARTIST OPENS UP CREATIVE DISCOVERIES THAT ONLY THE PROCESS ITSELF CAN INSPIRE. SILK-SCREEN PRINTING, IN PARTICULAR IN THE 60s AND 70s, BLURRED THE BOUNDARIES EVEN FURTHER WHEN SUCH ARTISTS AS ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG AND ANDY WARHOL EMPLOYED THE SILKSCREEN PROCESS TO CREATE UNIQUE WORKS ON CANVAS.

THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO CONTINUE ITS CONVERSATION WITH THE KNOWLEDGABLE AND ENGAGING JEFF BERGMAN, DIRECTOR AT PACE PRINTS.

http://paceprints.com/

Robert Mangold
Installation View
Pace Prints Chelsea
April – June 2017

JEFF, WELCOME BACK!

PRINTS OFFER AN EMERGING COLLECTOR THE OPPORTUNITY TO ACQUIRE WORKS BY ARTISTS OF KNOWN STATURE AND REPUTATION IN A MORE MODEST PRICE RANGE. DO YOU VIEW THAT AS A MOTIVATION FOR THE NASCENT COLLECTOR TO GRAVITATE TOWARDS PRINT EDITIONS RATHER THAN A UNIQUE WORK BY A LESS ESTABLISHED ARTIST?

Prints offer many things and the option of owning work by a big name artist for a relatively modest price is certainly at the top of collectors’ list.  Works on paper convey a sense of intimacy that many large works (paintings per se) cannot.  Hopefully a print collector can feel comfortable with the notion that the artist chose that specific image, and then proceeded to create 10 or 25 or 50 impressions.  In my mind, that speaks volumes to the artist’s confidence in that image.

 

 

Chuck Close: Self-Portrait, 2015, Print & Process
Pace Prints Chelsea
March – April 2017

WHAT ARTISTS ARE CURRENTLY MAKING THE BEST PRINTS AND IN WHAT WAYS? HAVE PRINTMAKING TECHNIQUES STAYED WITHIN THE TRADITIONAL METHODOLOGY AND HOW HAS MODERN TECHNOLOGY AFFECTED THE ART OF PRINTMAKING?

The artist that pushes print making the furthest in recent years is Chuck Close.  He continues to astound us all with the variety of techniques and the ways in which he uses traditional print making.  Chuck’s print career is a study in what is possible in prints and multiples.  His recent “felt hand stamp” prints (well illustrated and explained in Terrie Sultan’s Chuck Close Prints) is a slow and arduous process with remarkable results.  He continues to make elaborate woodcuts, etchings and works that utilize digital resources.

CHUCK CLOSE
Installation View

Self-Portrait (2015) was created over three years from 24 blocks that were used to render the image in 84 colors. The exhibition will include a selection of these woodblocks and progressive proofs together with the published print.

Throughout his career, Chuck Close has used his own image as a creative vehicle for his exploration of painting techniques and styles. Self-Portrait (2015) represents a significantly different facial perspective from earlier self portraits.

THERE ARE ALSO, OF COURSE, REMARKABLE COLLECTIONS DEDICATED SOLELY TO MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY PRINTS. HOW WOULD YOU CHARACTERIZE PACE COLLECTORS? WHAT MOTIVATES A COLLECTOR TO FOCUS ON PRINTMAKING.

Our collectors range widely.  We hope that whether they are buying large or small, no matter the expense, that they feel as though they have gained a direct connection with the artist and the image.

I believe a great print collector is someone who loves prints for what they are and appreciates the technique, but can also enjoy the image without the minutiae.

Jenny Holzer
“Conclusions,”2016
Set of six aquatint and white ground etchings
ON VIEW SUMMER EXHIBITION
Pace Prints Chelsea

HAS THERE BEEN A SHIFT IN THE PRINT MARKET WITH THE ADVENT OF POPULARITY OF PHOTOGRAPHY THAT IS PRINTED AS A MULTIPLE, ALTHOUGH WITH MUCH MORE LIMITED NUMBERS IN AN EDITION?

The photography market tends to follow the methodology of using small editions.  Print editions have also become smaller in recent years.  Whether there is a direct correlation I am not sure.

PACE HAS A LEGENDARY REPUTATION FOR ITS COLLABORATION WITH ARTISTS. I HAVE HEARD THEM SPEAK OF THE EXPERIENCE IN TRANSFORMATIVE TERMS. THE  MASTER PRINTER OPENS TECHNICAL AND AESTHETIC DOORWAYS AND INSPIRES THEIR WORK AND VISION WITH THE DIVERSITY OF TECHNIQUES AVAILABLE TO THEM.

Robert Mangold
“Double Square Frame”
2015
ON VIEW SUMMER EXHIBITION
Pace Prints
32 East 57 Street

ONE OF THE MOST DETAILED EXAMPLES OF THE INVALUABLE DIALOGUE BETWEEN MASTER PRINTER AND ARTIST DESCRIBING THE PRINTING PROCESS ON HAND-MADE PAPER IS DESCRIBED IN THE PACE PRINTS GLOSSARY. DANIEL HEIDKAMP’S HOLLOW SWALLOW, A RECENT MONOPRINT IS CURRENTLY ON VIEW IN THE GALLERY’S CONCURRENT SUMMER GROUP EXHIBITION SELECTIONS AT THE CHELSEA GALLERY AT 521 WEST 26TH STREET AND AT 32 EAST 57th STREET.

Daniel Heidkamp
Hollow Swallow, 2015
Hand-applied and stenciled paper pulp
43 x 32 1/2 inches
Unique

HANDMADE PAPER

Pace Paper master papermaker Ruth Lingen works with artists to create unique and editioned work in the hand papermaking process. In preparation to creating an image, fibers are macerated in a specialized beater to specific lengths for their specific type of application. Once macerated into paper pulp, the substance can be used to create individual sheets of paper or, when macerated to a finer grade, can retain high levels of pigmentation and be used in more contemporary applications.

The number of applications of working in handmade paper is diverse. Pigmented paper pulp, coined pulp paint in the papermaking world, can be poured into openings in mylar stencils (on top of a wet base sheet substrate), building up one wet layer on top of another. In another technique entitled a “blow out”, images can be masked out directly on the papermaking mould and retain a silhouette directly in paper pulp. Watermarking is an application that can be used within the sheet of paper to create an image that is visible when light is shown through the paper. Once an image is created, the entire sheet with layer upon layer of pigmented pulp slowly goes through a hydraulic press, forcing the water to escape and allowing the fibers to form hydrogen bonds, which hold all layers of fibers together.

Paper pulp can also be used in a three-dimensional format. In a casting, paper pulp is packed directly into a rubber mold, allowed to dry, and will come out as a sculptural form.

JIM DINE
The Heart and The Wall and The Green 2005
Etching, aquatint, and collograph
87 1/2 x 70 inches
Edition of 9

WHAT ARE THE TECHNIQUES THAT ARE THE MOST WIDELY USED AND HOW ARE THEY DEFINED?

We currently have shops that focus on traditional Ukiyo-e woodcut printing, any relief print possibilities, intaglio, hand made and cast paper and occasionally screen printing and digital production.

Artists such as Chuck Close and Jim Dine expored a range of techniques in our shops and created iconic images.  We are incredibly lucky to have had and continue to have the finest print makers in the world working with us at Pace.  The artists immediately recognize that the people printing with them are able and active collaborators.

Dan Walsh
“Elements”, 2016
Monoprint
On exhibit through August 18
Pace Prints Chelsea
521 West 26th Street

A GLOSSARY OF PRINT-MAKING TECHNIQUES:

The principle techniques of printmaking, with illustrated examples, all of which are practiced in the workshops of Pace Prints

http://paceprints.com/techniques

IN OUR NEXT POST, JEFF WILL INFORM US ON THE MOST RECENT ACTIVITIES AT PACE PRINTS AND SHARE HIS ASTUTE PERSPECTIVE ON COLLECTIN IN TODAY’S PRINT MARKET.  THANK YOU FOR FOLLOWING OUR POSTS!

 

Collecting prints with curator and expert, Jeff Bergman, director of Pace Prints

KAWS Portfolio from
Pace Prints

THE ART OF PRINTMAKING CAN BE EFFECTIVELY VIEWED FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE PRINT WORKSHOPS THAT PUBLISH THE EDITIONS. THE STUDIO INVITES ARTISTS TO PUBLISH AN EDITION AND IT IS VERY MUCH A COLLABORATION BETWEEN THE MASTER PRINTMAKER AND THE ARTIST WHO OFTEN FINDS A NEW AND RICH VISUAL VOCABULARY INSPIRED BY PRINTMAKING TECHNIQUES.

Matisse at Mourlot

IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY,  MAJOR ATELIERS IN EUROPE PRODUCED SOME OF THE PRINTS THAT ARE THE MOST HIGHLY VALUED IN TODAY’S PRINT MARKET. GALERIE LOUISE LEIRIS, A STUDIO IN PARIS, PUBLISHED MANY OF PICASSO’S PRINTS AND MOURLOT ENGAGED NOT ONLY PICASSO BUT ALSO MATISSE, ALEXANDER CALDER, GEORGES BRAQUE AND LEGER TO BRING THE WORK OF THESE SIGNIFICANT MASTERS TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC IN A RELATIVELY ACCESSIBLE FORM.

Helen Frankenthaler at
U.L.A.E

IN POST-WAR AMERICA, LONG ISLAND BASED U.L.A.E. FOUNDER, TANYA GROSSMAN, WAS RENOWNED FOR HER COLLABORATIVE WORK WITH JASPER JOHNS, JAMES ROSENQUIST AND CY TWOMBLY TO NAME A VERY FEW OF THE ARTISTS WHO EXPERIMENTED WITH INNOVATIVE PRINTMAKING TECHNIQUES AT HER WORKSHOP. IN LOS ANGELES, GEMINI G.E.L. FORMED FRIENDSHIPS WITH “LOCAL” ARTISTS SAM FRANCIS, KEN PRICE, ED RUSCHA AND BRITISH EX-PAT DAVID HOCKNEY. IDENTIFYING THE PUBLISHER AND THEIR REPUTATION FOR INSPIRED INTERACTION BETWEEN PRINTMAKER AND ARTIST PROVIDES THE COLLECTOR A VALUABLE TOOL WHEN CONSIDERING WORKS IN THE PRINT ART MARKET.


Gestures
Qin Feng, Lee Ufan, Jian-Jun Zhang
Installation view
Pace Prints

HERE IN NEW YORK, PACE PRINTS ENJOYS A 48- YEAR HISTORY OF COLLABORATING WITH MASTERS AND INNOVATORS OF PRINTMAKING.

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG IS VERY PLEASED TO WELCOME BACK JEFF BERGMAN, GALLERY DIRECTOR.

https://www.paceprints.com

 

Pablo Picasso
Minotaur

JEFF, PRIOR TO PACE, YOU WERE A DIRECTOR AT JOHN SZOKE EDITIONS, KNOWN FOR PRINTS BY PICASSO, EDVARD MUNCH AND OTHER MODERN MASTERS. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS OF YOUR EXPERIENCE AT THIS GALLERY?

John was kind enough to give me a job with no commercial art sales experience.  At the time, he was transitioning from his work as a publisher to becoming one of a handful of expert Picasso print dealers.  One highlight was seeing impressions and states of prints together, especially two states of Picasso’s Minotauromachy (La Minotauromachie), 1935, John helped me see the work evolve over time.

Plant house Gallery
Chelsea, New York

YOU HAVE CURATED SOME WONDERFUL EXHIBITIONS IN ADDITION TO YOUR WORK AT PACE. WHAT ARE SOME CURATORIAL PROJECTS THAT RESONATE THE MOST STRONGLY? DO YOU PROPOSE A THEME FOR AN EXHIBITION?

Rachel Gladfelter, a friend and fellow Director at Pace Prints, co-curated a show called Fold at Planthouse Gallery in 2015.  We did not focus on prints but it did include printmaking.  The artists we were able to show are pushing the picture plane in different directions.  The artists, Anders Bergstrom, Martha Willete Lewis, Matt Magee and Rachel Ostrow are all art workers as well so we had met them all in different contexts.  The show was successful because of the generosity of those artists and the gallery principals at Planthouse.  One of the pieces that was in the show, “Brown Bag Test, December 21, 2014, Proof and Counterproof” by Anders Bergstrom, was acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art and has been exhibited at the Met already.  I get to work with Museum collections often at Pace Prints, but it was especially exciting seeing work we chose for our exhibition selected for the Met.

Anders Bergstrom
Brown Bag Test, December 21, 2014
Collection, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Press Release  FOLD at Planthouse Gallery http://planthouse.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Planthouse-press-release_FOLD-2.pdf

WHEN DID YOU JOIN PACE PRINTS AND WHAT WAS THE GALLERY AND PUBLISHING ARM LIKE AT THE TIME?

I joined 10 years ago while Pace Prints was expanding.  We went from 1 gallery and 1 print shop to 2 galleries and 3 print shops in about 2 years.  We continue to work with some of the most outstanding contemporary artists to create dozens of new works and exhibitions every year.

RICHARD SOLOMON FOUNDED PACE PRINTS IN 1968. I KNOW THAT DICK HAS AN MBA FROM HARVARD. WHAT LED HIM INTO THE ART BUSINESS IN GENERAL AND PRINT PUBLISHING IN PARTICULAR?

Dick Solomon is passionate about art and has been for decades.  I believe he met Arne Glimcher in Boston right when Arne opened Pace Gallery.  Beyond that, you’d have to ask the man himself.

Lucas Samaras
Book
1968
Published by Pace Prints

WHO WERE THE FIRST ARTISTS THAT HE INVITED TO WORK WITH HIM?

Jean Dubuffet, Nicolas Krushenick, Louise Nevelson and Lucas Samaras.  The Lucas Samaras edition “Book” from 1968 was the very first project Pace Editions published.

WHAT IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PACE GALLERY AND PACE PRINTS IN TERMS OF THE ARTISTS THAT WORK WITH PACE PRINTS TO PUBLISH EDITIONS?

Historically we have published editions with Pace Gallery artists and in recent years have welcomed collaborations with artists represented by many galleries.

IN AN INTERVIEW IN ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST WITH DICK SOLOMON IN AUGUST 2010, WITH AD CONTRIBUTOR STEVEN M.L. ARONSON,

THE AUTHOR COMMENTS:

AT PACE PRINTS, ONE OF THE BIGGEST OPERATIONS THAT PUBLISHES AND SELLS ARTISTS’ PRINTS AND MULTIPLES, AND WHICH YOU’RE THE LONGTIME PRESIDENT OF, ONE IS ALLOWED, EVEN ENCOURAGED, TO GO INTO THE STACKS AND PULL THINGS OUT AND CONSIDER THEM, PRESSURE-FREE.

IS THIS WELCOMING AND UNPRETENTIOUS ATTITUDE CHARACTERISTIC OF PACE PRINTS TODAY?

We do have racks of art that are open to the public (we even wrote it on the wall) with names and prices on each piece.  We offer help to anyone who comes in and we allow people to explore if that is what they prefer.  We are transparent about pricing and always happy to speak with new people whether they are buyers or new to prints entirely.

Prints should be the most democratic works of art to collect.  We try and make it clear what we have and how much it is and if we don’t have it, where to go look.

JEFF, THANK YOU!

IN OUR NEXT POST, JEFF WILL PROVIDE INVALUABLE GUIDANCE TO BOTH THE NASCENT AND ESTABLISHED PRINT COLLECTOR. PLEASE JOIN US!

DROP INTO PACE PRINTS 57th STREET AND CHELSEA THIS SUMMER TO VIEW A WONDERFUL GROUP EXHIBITION OF RECENT WORKS: SELECTIONS.

The art of the print with Jeff Bergman, director of Pace Prints

Jeff Bergman
Director
Pace Prints

THE HISTORY OF PRINTMAKING DATES BACK AS EARLY AS THE 15th CENTURY. IN GERMANY, INDIVIDUAL PRINTS OFTEN DEPICTED RELIGIOUS IMAGES AND WERE CARRIED BY CRUSADERS ON PILGRIMAGE. FROM CIRCA 1402 TO 1425, THE FIRST PHASE OF THE WOODCUT DEVELOPED, HAND-COLORED AND INCREASINGLY COMPLEX IN WHICH SINGLE IMAGES ON A BLANK BACKGROUND EXPANDED TO INCLUDE LANDSCAPE AND ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENTS. IN 15th CENTURY ITALY, PARTICULARLY IN THE CULTURED NORTHERN CITIES, SUCH AS FLORENCE AND MILAN, THE RENAISSANCE MOVEMENT STIMULATED ARTISTS’ RECEPTIVITY TO EMBRACE PURELY AESTHETIC AND DECORATIVE CREATIVE PATHS.

TODAY, PRINTMAKERS NOT ONLY CONTINUE TO MAINTAIN THE LEGACY OF TRADITIONAL TECHNIQUES BUT ALSO TO EXPLORE NEW INNOVATIVE PROCESSES AVAILABLE THROUGH MODERN TECHNOLOGY.

PACE PRINTS, LOCATED IN NEW YORK UPTOWN AT 32 EAST 57th STREET OFF MADISON AND IN CHELSEA AT 521 WEST 26th STREET, IS A WORLD-CLASS PUBLISHER AND DEALER FOR MODERN MASTER AND CONTEMPORARY PRINTS THAT IS A WORLD CLASS PRINT PUBLISHER AND GALLERY.

Dick Solomon
Founder, Pace Prints

FOUNDED BY RICHARD SOLOMON, IN 1968, PACE PRINTS IS A EXCEPTIONAL  RESOURCE FOR BOTH CONTEMPORARY AND MASTER PRINTS OFFERING AN EXTENSIVE ROSTER OF INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED ESTABLISHED AND CUTTING-EDGE ARTISTS. PRINT EDITIONS HAS ALWAYS PROVIDED THE ART ADVISOR AND COLLECTOR AN OPPORTUNITY TO ACQUIRE WORKS BY CONTEMPORARY LUMINARIES AS CHUCK CLOSE, SOL LEWITT, ED RUSCHA AND FRANK STELLA WITHIN MORE MODEST BUDGETARY PARAMETERS.

http://paceprints.com/

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO INTRODUCE JEFF BERGMAN,  DIRECTOR OF PACE PRINTS, TO INFORM US ABOUT THIS VITAL AREA OF ART-MAKING.

JEFF, MANY THANKS FOR YOUR CONTRIBUTION. HOW DID YOU FIRST BECOME INTERESTED IN ART?

Well first off, thanks for involving me in your project!

The Aldrich Museum
Ridgefield, Connecticut

I became interested in art as a child.  My grandfather was a graphic artist for a Jewish Department Store in Midtown.  I had been drawn to visual art from an early age but my formative experience with contemporary art was at The Aldrich Museum in Ridgefield, CT.  I was a student docent there in the mid-90’s when Harry Philbrick was running the program.  He went on to run the Aldrich for many years.  He and Nina Carlson trained high school age kids to really discuss the work they saw.  We were grounded in the physical first and then went on to make our own associations.  We were handed research materials like a grown up docent was and were given an education.  I loved being in front of art and having those conversations.  I still do.

Wassily Kandinsky
Illustrative composition in
Point and Line to Plane

WHAT EDUCATIONAL STEPS DID YOU TAKE TO DEVELOP THIS INTEREST?

Beyond the Aldrich, I went to a public HS that had a surprisingly good Art History course.  After HS I went to Hampshire College in Amherst, MA and did a concentration in Art History and Theory, writing my thesis on Wassily Kandinsky’s text Point and Line to Plane.  Hampshire allowed me to craft my own course of study.  I took classes at Smith and Amherst often, utilizing resources at all 5 colleges.

Studying Kandinsky and the Bauhaus in an undergrad program alongside brilliant professors was a true gift.  Sura Levine, a brilliant scholar and a good friend to this day, was my advisor from day 1.  Hampshire had contemporary artists teaching innovative courses and I took a sprawling foundation class with Walid Raad, Jacqueline Hayden and Joan Braverman that introduced me to much of the art theory I would dive into over the next 4 years.  We were told to buy the recently deceased John Berger’s slim treatise Ways of Seeing that first day of class.

FEATURED PRINT
Kate Shepherd
Teddy 2016
Monoprint
40 1/4 x 60 1/2 inches
Unique
Published by Pace Editions, Inc.

Later I took courses with Barbara Kellum at Smith and Christoph Cox at Hampshire that allowed me to think more critically about the theory and critique of visual art.  Ultimately I was happy to ground my studies in Kandinsky’s concrete notions at the birth of abstraction.

Sol LeWitt: Prints
Installation view
September – October 2016
Pace Prints

HAD YOU ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN PRINTMAKING OR WERE YOU INITIALLY DRAWN TO PAINTINGS AND SCULPTURE?  WHAT ARTISTS FIRST RESONATED WITH YOU AND HOW DO YOU EVALUATE THEM TODAY?

Printmaking was something I came to during college as I looked at the work of Bauhaus artists, and generally at the work of early 20th century art in Europe.  Initially the work that really excited me was Kandinsky’s which was always on view at the Guggenheim and MoMA and then Sol LeWitt at the Aldrich and Mark Rothko at the Tate (now Tate Britain).

My good friend Katie Commodore who is an artist and printmaker was always kind enough to let me see what she was working on at RISD so I got a sense of contemporary printmaking that way.

FEATURED PRINT
Robert Rauschenberg
Cock Sure 1993
Color silkscreen, hot wax, silver pigment dust and acrylic
Edition of 17

IN THE NEXT LRFA POST, JEFF WILL INFORM US OF HIS PROFESSIONAL HISTORY AS CURATOR, SCHOLAR AND DEALER IN PRINTS.

PLEASE TAKE ADVANTAGE OF HIS EXPERTISE AND DEDICATION TO THIS FIELD, AND ASK THIS GENEROUS GUY ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE.

THANK YOU!

 

When at Documenta, enjoy Dusseldorf with Turon Travel expert, Nicholas Christopher

 

MARTA MINUJIN
The Parthenon of Books
2017
Documenta 14

IN HIS ENGAGING BOOK, HIT MAKERS: THE SCIENCE OF POPULARITY IN AN AGE OF DISTRACTION, Atlantic SENIOR EDITOR, DEREK THOMPSON, EXPLORES THE ECONOMICS OF THE CULTURAL MARKETS THAT INVISIBLY SHAPE OUR LIVES. ALONG WITH OTHER INFLUENCES, THE MAKING OF A BLOCKBUSTER, BE IT A BUSINESS, A VISUAL ARTIST, OR A POP STAR, IS NOT REALLY ABOUT QUALITY, BUT ABOUT EXPOSURE AND AUDIENCE.

THIS SUMMER, SEVERAL EUROPEAN VENUES COALESCE TO PROVIDE THE COLLECTOR, CURATOR AND ART ENTHUSIAST ENORMOUS EXPOSURE TO A WIDE RANGE OF ARTISTS, GALLERIES, AND CURATORIAL PLATFORMS: ART BASEL, THE VENICE BIENNALE, AND DOCUMENTA 14.

TO ENRICH YOUR EXPERIENCE AT DOCUMENTA 14 OR, AT THE LEAST, HAVE A TRULY INFORMED ARM CHAIR VISIT, CHECK OUT THIS EXCELLENT INTERVIEW IN FLASH ART WITH DOCUMENTA CURATORS, MONIKA SZEWCZYK AND HENRIK FOLKERTS ON THE THEMES OF THE EXHIBITION AND THE CHALLENGES OF PRESENTING A SHOW IN BOTH ATHENS, GREECE AND KASSEL, GERMANY.

http://www.flashartonline.com/2017/06/monika-szewczyk-and-hendrik-folkerts-on-documenta-14-kassel/

Dusseldorf skyline

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO ENLIST THE EXPERTISE OF NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER, FOUNDER OF TURON TRAVEL, THE TRAVEL AGENCY FOR THE ART WORLD, TO ENHANCE OUR JOURNEY. NICHOLAS, LEAD THE WAY!

https://www.turontravel.com

Frank Gehry
Dusseldorf

Dusseldorf is a quick train ride from Kassel, the site of Documenta 14, and well worth a visit while you’re there. 

Dusseldorf, the capital of North Rhine-Westphalia, is a thriving international metropolis. Although the city was largely destroyed in WWII, those interested in modern architecture will have a great deal to see. The promenade on the bank of the Rhine is one of the most beautiful in Germany and the harbor hosts some spectacular post-modern  architecture, the centerpiece being Frank Gehry’s Spiral Constructions. 

The Dusseldorf Academy, founded in 1762 as a school of drawing, is internationally renowned for its graduates, such artists as Sigmar Polke, Anselm Kiefer and Joseph Beuys. The School of Photography is equally notable for the teachers, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and their students that include Andreas Gursky, Candida Hofer, Thomas Ruff and Thomas Struth. 

 

Erika Hock
Second Home
Sammlung Philara
April 28 – July 25, 2017

Sammlung Philara 

A former factory curated by art collector Gil Bronner,  the Philara combines a permanent exhibition of Bronner’s personal collection along with 4 temporary exhibitions featuring the works of both established and new artists working in almost every format.  This combination allows the participant to enjoy a cornucopia of experiences.  The collection also offers numerous interdisciplinary events with concerts, readings and lectures planned throughout the year.

NRW- Forum Dusseldorf

Considered more of a cultural center than a museum, the NRW-Forum attempts to blur the line between art and culture. Divided into 3 different exhibitions, the Forum allows you to explore multiple mediums and collections ranging from photography featuring Ralf Brueck, a graduate of the renowned Dusseldorf School of Photography (with the collection exploring digital image manipulation) to a mixed media collection from Olaf Breuning. Futurists will love Planet B, an installation focusing on relocation and establishment on a new planet.

Setareh Gallery
Dusseldorf

Setareh Gallery on Konigsallee

A contemporary art collection in Dusseldorf, the Setarah (which translates to “star” in Farsi) Gallery is the place to go to see some of the best curated exhibitions. The current show, “The shadow does not avoid the sun” includes works by such marvelous German artists as Per Kirkeby, Markus Lupertz and Wolfgang Betke.

RESTAURANTS

Great food and drink are always a mainstay for the Germans and the lucky visitors who need to rest and dine during their busy art viewing.  Here are a few of the many delicious restaurants in Dusseldorf.  None of them will fracture your wallet, but they all will leave you satisfied.

Sansibar Restaurant

Sansibar

– View of the Rhine

Boasting exquisite panoramic views over the Rhine River from its perch on Media Harbor,  Sandbar is a high-class lounge-come-bar that offers a multitude of international dishes. From juicy steaks to sushi, oysters, fresh fish and the traditional German curry-wurst, this joint by Breuninger is a smorgasbord of flavors. What’s more, great wines abound, with more than 350 types on offer from the cellar. Located on the first floor of the Breuninger Center, Sansibar is a delight for all palates.

Victorian Restaurant

Victorian Restaurant

– Award winning gourmet dining

Victorian is a multiple award-winning restaurant that’s hailed for its gourmet dishes, cooking methods and innovative combinations that change daily. Expect a menu that ranges from fresh fish in the main to delicious starters, such as radish, cucumber and mustard that manage to challenge tasters’ perceptions. The restaurant has a major focus on lunch, but also has delightful dinner options and an impressive collection of wines from all over the world.

Dorfstube

An Old Fashioned German Tavern( A common German name for German taverns or pubs is Kneipe)

Uber-traditional Dorfstube is a complete timber restaurant with a nostalgic hint of the old-fashioned German village tavern. The restaurant is quirky with curious pieces of décor, like the grand old Alkoda stove, accompanied by home-made wood grinders, cook-clocks and lines of classic tea cups with reindeer prints, specifically designed in line with the original Black Forest kitchen. But Dorfstube offers far more than just traditional design, it also impresses with extravagant dishes, such as warm oxtail pralines and coq-au-vin from local farmers, followed up by a crispy rhubarb crumble.

Uerige Brewery

Uerige

Why not stop at a brewery?

Breweries are typical places for Germans to meet and chat after a hard day at work, but characterful Uerige is not only a local meeting places but also home to some of the best regional German beer in the country. With a friendly and cozy atmosphere spread across six major rooms, patrons have plenty of space to celebrate German cuisine, beer or just being in Düsseldorf. On the menu, distinctive types of sausages, soups, tartare, and red beet carpaccio with goats’ cheese rub shoulders, while for dessert try the super-light and creamy panna cotta.

THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO NEXT WELCOME JEFF BERGMAN, THE DIRECTOR OF PACE PRINTS. PACE ENJOYS A WELL-DESERVED REPUTATION FOR OUTSTANDING PUBLICATIONS OF CONTEMPORARY EDITIONS. FOUNDED BY DICK SOLOMON IN 1968, PACE OFFERS ARTISTS A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT AND INNOVATIVE PRINTMAKING TECHNIQUES.

UNTIL THEN!

Pack your bags! Join travel expert, Turon’s Nicholas Christopher, at Documenta 14

DOCUMENTA 14
Opening June 10th in Kassel, Germany

DOCUMENTA, HELD EVERY FIVE YEARS IN KASSEL, GERMANY, ITS TRADITIONAL HOME, REPRESENTS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ART EXHIBITS IN THE WORLD FOR CONTEMPORARY ART AND IDEAS.  FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE ITS INCEPTION IN 1955,  DOCUMENTA HAS TWO VENUES, THE FIRST IN ATHENS, GREECE THAT OPENED ON APRIL 18th AND THE SECOND IN KASSEL OPENING ON JUNE 10th.

HEADED BY ADAM SZYMCZYK, FORMER DIRECTOR AND CHIEF CURATOR AT THE KUNSTHALLE BASEL FROM 2003 UNTIL 2014, THIS CELEBRATED POLISH ART CRITIC AND CURATOR IS KNOWN FOR INTRODUCING RELATIVELY UNKNOWN ARTISTS INTO THE PUBLIC SECTOR. IN DOCUMENTA 14, ENTITLED “LEARNING FROM ATHENS”, HIS CURATORIAL INTENT IS TO EXPLORE BOTH CONTEMPORARY AND HISTORICAL INTERPRETATIONS OF THE SOCIO-POLITICAL THEMES THAT SHAPED EUROPE THEN AND NOW: IMMIGRATION, THE FINANCIAL CRISIS, CENSORSHIP AND DISPLACEMENT. ARTISTS HAVE CREATED WORK FOR BOTH LOCATIONS AND THE CUSTOMARY 100 DAY FESTIVAL HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO SPAN 100 DAYS IN EACH OF THE TWO CITIES.

Documenta 14
April 8 – July 16, 2017
Athens, Greece

THE LRFA BLOG IS VERY PLEASED TO WELCOME BACK OUR TRAVEL EXPERT, NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER, TO SHARE THE HISTORY OF DOCUMENTA AND HIGHLIGHTS OF KASSEL AND ITS ENVIRONS WITH US. FOUNDED BY NICHOLAS, THIS YEAR TURON TRAVEL CELEBRATES ITS 38th ANNIVERSARY! TURON WORKS WITH  A GROWING NUMBER OF INTERNATIONAL ART FAIRS, ART AND ANTIQUE FAIRS AND SPECIAL ART EVENTS TO CREATE A SEAMLESS PROCESS THAT BENEFITS THE EVENT PATRONS, THE EXHIBITORS AND THE VENUE.

https://www.turontravel.com

WELCOME BACK, NICHOLAS.

Documenta takes place every 5 years in Kassel, Germany.  For the 2017 edition, the theme has been expanded and it started in Athens, Greece, this April, moving on to Kassel June 10th.  Calling itself the ‘museum of 100 days’, Documenta goes beyond a forum for contemporary art’s current trends displaying new innovative exhibition concepts. 

Adam Szymczyk
Artistic Director
Documenta 14

Documenta Athens, curated by Adam Szymczyk, drew criticism from the local arts community for ‘Cultural Imperialism’ with Germany being a European economic power house as opposed to Greece which is still undergoing drastic austerity programs.  Mr. Szymczyk feels that by presenting work in Greece, Documenta can exert influence in the arena of the European Union. “A cultural enterprise of this magnitude has power to influence politics,”  he says. The Athens event ends July 10th.

Dating back to the 10th century, in the 1800s, Kassel was the capital of the Brothers Grimm Fairy Tale Route.  Totally rebuilt after World War II, it still has a few examples of its earlier historical sites, the 18th century Wilhelmshohe Castle being one of its more prominent landmarks.

Wilhelmshohe Castle
Kassel

Founded by Arnold Bode, a German architect, painter and designer, Documenta is an exhibition which displays modern and contemporary art. From its first edition in 1955, Documenta was able to establish itself as a key international rendezvous for avant-garde work. Taking place every five years, Documenta 13 was the latest exhibition and was held in 2012.  Arnold Bode’s focus wanted to introduce art that was banned during the Nazi era, essentially bringing Germans up to speed with expressionism, fauvism, cubism, Blauer Reiter, Pittura Metafisica and Futurism, all of which was considered degenerate by the Regime.

Arnold Bode
1900-1977

The 1st edition focused on abstract art and featured the work of Kandinsky and Picasso.  130,000 people visited the exhibitions, thus establishing the show’s international credentials. Documenta features a variety of artistic mediums including, but not limited to, sculpture, performance, research, painting, film, photography and installation, as well as text-based and audio works. Moreover, it provides a platform for artists who want to experiment with new practices in the fields of literature, science, ecology, aesthetics, politics and – naturally – art.

 

 

Marta Minujin
The Parthenon of Books
Documenta 14 Kassel

Kassel opens to the public on June 10th and anticipates a steady stream of art enthusiasts visiting through September 17th. Most of the 160 artists that are participating will be showing in both cities and it will be interesting to see if their projects hold different gravitas within these two settings.
IN THE NEXT LRFA POST, NICHOLAS TAKES US ON A TOUR OF SOME OUTSTANDING MUSEUMS AND RECOMMENDS SOME DELICIOUS GERMAN CUISINE TO FUEL US ON OUR WAY.

PLEASE JOIN US!

The art market, present and future, with international dealer, Christophe Van de Weghe

Van de Weghe Fine Art
ART BASEL 2015

MORE THAN NINETY ART FAIRS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD NOW DEFINE THE RHYTHM OF THE GLOBAL ART BUSINESS. IN A PANEL DISCUSSION ON THE RISE OF ART FAIRS ORGANIZED BY STROPHEUS LLC,  A NEW YORK BASED COLLECTIVE OF ART LAW AND BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS, MODERATOR JUDITH PROWDER, A MEMBER OF THE NEW YORK BAR ASSOCIATION AND FACULTY AT SOTHEBY’S INSTITUTE OF ART, CONCLUDES:

There are dozens of NYC art fairs. With the rise and rise of art fairs, sheer survival in the commercial art context now requires galleries to participate in a half a dozen or more art fairs a year – from New York to Maastricht to Dubai to Hong Kong to São Paolo – with stops along the way. Some dealers make as much as two-thirds of their sale at fairs. Art fairs have indeed transformed the business of art and even the production of contemporary art. For serious collectors the international art fair circuit is an imperative, while visiting only a few of galleries in NY, London and Berlin seems – well – almost quaint.

https://stropheus.com/

Van de Weghe Fine Art
ART BASEL HONOG KONG 2017

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG IS VERY PLEASED TO RESUME ITS CONVERSATION WITH CHRISTOPHE VAN DE WEGHE, FOUNDER AND PRINCIPLE OF VAN DE WEGHE FINE ARTS, LOCATED AT 1018 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK.

http://www.vdwny.com

 

Van de Weghe Fine Art
FRIEZE MASTERS 2015

CHRISTOPHE,  FAIRS HAVE GAINED CRITICAL AND COMMERCIAL DOMINANCE IN THE ART MARKET – A CONCENTRATED AND INTENSE PLAYING FIELD OF CURATORS, COLLECTORS, AND DEALERS. I KNOW YOU PARTICIPATE AT ART BASEL MIAMI, ART BASEL, FRIEZE MASTERS, AND MAASTRICHT. CLEARLY, YOU BELIEVE, AS I DO, THAT THE FAIR HAS BECOME AN INTEGRAL ELEMENT IN THE ART BUSINESS.

Fairs are a very important part of our operation. We present annually at TEFAF Maastricht, Art Basel Hong Kong, Art Basel, FIAC Paris, Frieze Masters London and Art Basel Miami Beach. We have participated in ADAA’s Art Show at the Park Avenue Armory, The Pavilion of Art and Design London, EXPO Chicago, Arte Fiera Bologna, the Palm Beach Art Fair, ARCO Madrid and ART Hong Kong.

This year we also participated in TEFAF New York Spring, sponsored by TEFAF Maastricht, held for the first time at the Park Avenue Armory from May 4-8th. I am very excited about this fair and its strong future.

Van de Weghe Fine Art
TEFAF NYC SPRING 2017

WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE TRAJECTORY OF COLLECTING IN THE TIME AHEAD?

The architects of today are building modern, contemporary spaces. In 2016 alone, in New York, 6400 apartments were new construction, characterized by high ceilings and large-scaled rooms.  The scale and delicacy of Impressionist works cannot survive in these spaces and the best of these works are all in museums.

The contemporary collector, the younger generation of hedge fund guys and tech wizards, all want young artists and they all want the same ones. Basquiat only made 900 paintings and 3400 drawings in his lifetime.

The problem with dealing with living artists is that they are commanding too much money. I don’t agree with the amounts that collectors are paying because I am not convinced these works will hold value.  There has been a huge correction in the photography market. Cindy Sherman will survive but a lot of them will not.

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE TO SOMEONE INTEREST IN ART AND IN BUILDING A COLLECTION?

 My advice is to development a good relationship with 2 or 3 galleries where you respect their program.

HOW WOULD YOU CHARACTERIZE A GOOD DEALER OR GALLERIST?

 

Beyeler Foundation
Basel, Switzerland

I once asked Ernst Beyeler, “In your opinion what does it take to be a good dealer?

He replied, “Honesty, courage, passion and hard work.”

LRFA ASIDE:  ALL OF WHICH CHRISTOPHE POSSESSES IN SPADES!

Ernst Beyeler (1921–2010) was a titan of the international art scene in the twentieth century. Born in Basel, Switzerland, he began his career as an apprentice in an antiquarian bookstore, eventually taking over the business and shifting his focus from books to dealing and collecting art. Through his discerning eye for art, his close relationships with many of the twentieth century’s great artists, and his role in the foundation of Art Basel and the Fondation Beyeler, he transformed his hometown into a hub for international art.

Van de Weghe Fine Art
Henrique Oliveira Installation
April 28 – June 30, 2017

 

TO COMMEMORATE ITS 10th ANNIVERSARY, IN 2014 VAN DE WEGHE FINE ART PUBLISHED A BEAUTIFULLY DOCUMENTED AND ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE OF GALLERY EXHIBITION HIGHLIGHTS.  FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT THE GALLERY AT info@vdwny.com.

VAN DE WEGHE NEW YORK
Published in 2014 to document the gallery’s 10th anniversary

 

CHRISTOPHE, WHAT IS THE CURRENT EXHIBIT AT VAN DE WEGHE FINE ART?

Although the gallery usually presents works from the secondary market, I am very excited to present the work of a young Brazilian artist, Henrique Oliveira. In 2013 I saw his installation at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris where he created a spectacular Gordian Knot of wood and sculptural vegetation that interacted with the architecture of the space.

It is quite exciting to see the way in which Henrique has  transformed the gallery into a site-specific installation, a fusion of urban design, sculptural elements and plant life. The installation was labor-intensive and we documented its progress throughout. 

AND WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE FUTURE OF VAN DE WEGHE FINE ART?

I love what I do. My greatest wish is to have all my kids work with me.

AND I’M CERTAIN THEY WILL.

CHRISTOPHE, SO MANY THANKS.

 

PACK YOUR BAGS! OUR TRAVEL MAVEN AND EXPERT, NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER OF TURON TRAVEL, WILL TAKE US TO DOCUMENTA 14 OPENING ON JUNE 10th IN KASSEL, GERMANY. FOR THE FIRST TIME,  ATHENS, GREECE ACTED AS CO-HOST OF THIS EXTRAORDINARY EXHIBITION, TITLED “LEARNING FROM ATHENS”, THAT TAKES PLACE EVERY FIVE YEARS.

PLEASE JOIN US!