leslierankow

Contemporary and Modern Art Advisory Service

The care and conservation of a collection: consult The Clarion List for expert help


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BUYING YOUR FIRST WORK OF ART IS A MEMORABLE EXPERIENCE! BE IT A LITHOGRAPH BY AN ARTIST WHOSE WORK YOU HAVE ALWAYS APPRECIATED IN ITS ORIGINAL FORM IN A MUSEUM COLLECTION, A CONTEMPORARY ASSEMBLAGE BY AN EMERGING ARTIST FROM A LOCAL ART FAIR OR A RECORD-BREAKING SECONDARY MARKET PAINTING FROM AN EVENING AUCTION, THE SELECTION PROCESS AND ULTIMATE CHOICE, SOMETIMES NERVE-WRACKING, IS ONLY THE FIRST OF MANY DECISIONS THAT THE COLLECTOR MUST MAKE AS CUSTODIAN OF A WORK OF ART.

 

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AS SEASONED COLLECTOR KNOW, THE  NEWLY ACQUIRED WORK SHOULD BE INSURED AND DOCUMENTED IN AN INVENTORY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM, ITS CONDITION EXAMINED BY A CONSERVATOR SPECIALIZING IN THE MEDIUM AND PERIOD OF THE WORK, FRAMED APPROPRIATELY TO ENHANCE THE ARTWORK, AND THEN – THE MOST FUN OF ALL  – INSTALLED IN A LOCATION THAT PERFECTLY ENHANCES ITS PRESENCE. THESE ARE JUST SOME OF THE CONSIDERATIONS NECESSARY FOR THE ONGOING CARE OF A COLLECTION.

SPECIFIC WORKS HAVE SPECIFIC NEEDS. FOR EXAMPLE, DAMIEN HIRST’S STUDIO GENERATES A REPORT ON THE CARE AND CONSERVATION OF THE ENTOMOLOGY PAINTINGS. TO INSURE THE CONDITION OF THE BUTTERFLIES, HIRST BUILDS A SPECIAL POCKET INTO THE FRAME OF THE CANVAS FOR AN INHIBITOR (MOTH PROOFING) THAT NEEDS TO BE INSPECTED AND CHANGED OVER A PERIOD OF TIME. “THE PAINTING NEEDS TO BE GIVEN A VISUAL INSPECTION ON A REGULAR BASIS TO ENSURE THAT THE SURFACE OF THE WORK IS IN GOOD CONDITION WITH NO SIGN OF CHANGE.”

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HOW DOES THE COLLECTOR PUT TOGETHER THE BEST POSSIBLE TEAM OF RESPONSIBLE EXPERTS TO SUPPORT THE WORKS OF ART? THANKS TO THE CLARION LIST,  A CURRENT ONLINE DIRECTORY CAN PROVIDE EXPERTS IN EVERY SERVICE CATEGORY, SORTED BY LOCATION! THANKS TO THE INNOVATIVE IDEA AND DEDICATED HARD WORK OF CO-FOUNDERS, JESSICA PAINDIRIS AND GAIA BANOVICH, THE SEARCH IS EASIER AND MORE JUDICIOUS THAN EVER BEFORE. SEE FOR YOURSELF!

https://www.clarionlist.com

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BROWSE BY CATEGORY
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UNITED STATES
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JESSICA, THANKS SO MUCH FOR YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO THE LRFA BLOG.

TO CONTINUE, WHAT ARE THE PRIMARY NEEDS OF COLLECTORS AND HOW DOES THE DIRECTORY ADDRESS THESE?

Collectors are looking for the right company to buy or sell art, service an existing collection, or help grow a collection. We enable them to find do a very narrow search as needed – they can sort by company size (perhaps they want someone with global reach or local focus), years in business (perhaps they want a veteran professional vs. a younger professional who may have lower fees), location (maybe you want to find a storage company in your own neighborhood), and specialty (you want not just an appraiser, but an old master specialist), and a company who has great client ratings. You can “Refine by” all these options on the left hand side of all search results.

WHAT ARE THE PRIMARY NEEDS OF THE ARTIST AND IN WHAT WAYS DOES THE CLARION LIST RESPOND TO THEIR CONCERNS?

Artists are also looking for the right company for them as well and want to expand their options and find better or less expensive companies to work with. Artists tend to be interested in our list of framers, storage companies, marketing firms and law firms among others.

WHAT CRITERIA DOES THE DIRECTORY ESTABLISH FOR PRIVATE ART DEALERS AND ADVISORS AND WHAT IS THE CLARION LIST’S SCOPE OF SERVICES, AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION AND EXPERTISE?

We have a wide range of private art dealers – those who have their own inventory to sell, those looking to acquire inventory and those who are able to privately seek out particular works on behalf of a client. We list both dealers who work out of an office and those that appear to be galleries but are only available by appointment in our “Private Art Dealers” category.

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HOW DOES THE RATING AND REVIEW SYSTEM WORK AT THE CLARION LIST? WHAT DO YOU HOPE IT PROVIDES?

We hope it provides transparency and accountability for the global art market. Any client or colleague of a listed company may submit a review; it takes just a few minutes and requires quick account log-in. clarionlist.com/reviews details the quick process.

YOUR EDUCATIONAL BLOG IS A VITAL ADDITION TO THE DIRECTORY, TOUCHING ON TOPICS AS WIDE-RANGING AS THE ART MARKET, AUCTIONS AND ART TRANSPORT. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE SUBJECTS YOU EXPLORE THAT YOU CONSIDER THE MOST IMPORTANT? WHAT ARE SOME OF THE TOPICS YOU PLAN TO ADDRESS IN FUTURE POSTS?

With a growing collecting class – especially among millennials – its important to educate about how to care for art before and after purchase. We try to highlight art services among our 35 listed categories. Some of our more popular topics are “how-to’s” and “why hire” regarding art appraisers, conservators and private dealers. We write one educational piece for month and its featured in our monthly e-blast available for sign-up here: http://eepurl.com/bePKFf

bg-conservationWe also curate 3rd party content about growing and servicing art collections. Following our Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn pages are good ways to ensure you are up to date on these types of articles.

twitter.com/ClarionList

facebook.com/clarionlist

linkedin.com/company/the-clarion-list

instagram.com/the_clarion_list

IN OUR NEXT LRFA POST, JESSICA WILL ENLIGHTEN US ON FUTURE PLANS AND DIRECTIONS FOR THE CLARION LIST. THEY ARE EXPANDING SO RAPIDLY, IT MAY BE OUTDATED BY THE TIME THE LRFA BLOG POSTS! DO CHECK OUT THIS INNOVATIVE ONLINE DIRECTORY FOR YOURSELF, A VALUABLE RESOURCE IN OUR 2.0 WORLD!

The Clarion List: an indispensable companion to the art of collecting

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THE IDEA FOR THE LRFA BLOG WAS PROMPTED BY THE SALE OF A WORK TO A CLIENT IN THE MIDWEST FROM A EUROPEAN DEALER IN WHICH MANY PRACTICAL THINGS WENT WRONG, ALL RIGHTED IN THE END THANKS TO THE DECENCY OF BOTH BUYER AND SELLER. THIS INCIDENT INSPIRED THE PURPOSE OF THE LRFA BLOG: TO SEEK OUT THE EXPERTISE OF THE REMARKABLE COLLEAGUES, GALLERISTS, AUCTION SPECIALISTS, AND SERVICE COMPANIES THAT SUPPORT THE ART WORLD OF COLLECTORS, ART ADVISORS, AND GALLERISTS. AT THE TIME, THE ART OF LEARNING WITH WHOM TO WORK WAS EXPERIENTIAL. NO SINGLE, VETTED, SOURCE EXISTED TO PROVIDE THE HUGE SCOPE OF EXPERTISE AND SERVICES THAT IS REQUIRED IN THE PROCESS OF ACQUIRING OR DEACCESSIONING ARTWORKS.

NOW, GRATEFULLY, WE HAVE THE CLARION LIST!

THE CLARION LIST WAS LAUNCHED FOR THE SINGULAR PURPOSE OF PROVIDING THIS TYPE OF INFORMATION, AND SO MUCH MORE.  THIS 21st CENTURY ONLINE DATABASE FEATURES A VERY BROAD RANGE OF 35 ART SERVICE CATEGORIES FROM THE PRACTICAL (ART TRANSPORT,  INSTALLATION, FRAMING, ETC.) TO THE HIGHLY SOPHISTICATED (ART FUNDS, ART LAWYERS, ACCOUNTANTS AND ESTATE SPECIALISTS).  MOST SIGNIFICANTLY, THE DIRECTORY PROVIDES A RATINGS AND REVIEW SYSTEM THAT EVALUATES THE QUALITY OF SERVICE OF EACH PROVIDER.

https://www.clarionlist.com/

 

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THE LRFA BLOG IS VERY PLEASED TO CONTINUE ITS CONVERSATION WITH CLARION LIST’S CO-FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT, JESSICA PAINDIRIS.

JESSICA, WE LIVE IN A TIME ABUNDANT WITH START UP IDEAS FOR ONLINE COMPANIES. HOW DID THE CLARION LIST DISTINGUISH ITSELF AND, IN JUST OVER A YEAR, GAIN THE MOMENTUM AND ATTENTION IT CURRENTLY ENJOYS?

A big reason we’ve gained momentum so quickly is that the art world is very receptive to our idea! We’re constantly fielding inquires to be added to the list or to expand our database to new markets. Even veteran art world insiders understand the need for the accessibility, transparency, and accountability that The Clarion List provides.

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Also, our timing is right – more and more collectors are entering the market especially with “entry level” purchases, often by buying online which cuts them off from traditional referral sources. The art market is going global – art collectors are traveling and needing services in new markets. Finally, the “collaborative economy” is mainstream – most people are used to review sites – like Yelp, Tripadvisor and more – and used to researching companies online before making hiring decisions.

WHAT WAS YOUR MOTIVATION IN LAUNCHING THIS DATABASE?

The 21st-century collector – both established and new – demands transparency, accountability and online accessibility to information. And, art companies want to reach new clients online more efficiently.

WHAT IS THE MISSION OF THE CLARION LIST?

Our mission is very simple: give art collectors who are looking for art services access to a list of service professionals in a given market and to supplement their research with feedback from these vendors’ clients and colleagues. In other words, we want to reveal what was once hidden behind closed doors and change the established, inefficient word-of-mouth system of sourcing vendors.

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WHAT IS THE APPLICATION PROCEDURE TO JOIN THE DIRECTORY AS AN ART SERVICE PROVIDER?

If not already listed, an art service company can contact us (contact@clarionlist.com). We review all inquiries individually; if it meets our listing criteria (location & category) then we add the listing for free.

WHAT IS THE PROCEDURE FOR AN ART ADVISOR OR CONSULTANT INTERESTED IN JOINING THE DIRECTORY?

Same procedure as above! We endeavor to respond to all inquiries within 1 to 2 business days.

THE CLARION LIST PROVIDES A VERY COMPREHENSIVE ONLINE DATABASE. HOW DOES THE DIRECTORY RESEARCH THE RECOMMENDED PROVIDERS TO BE CERTAIN THEY ARE QUALIFIED AND RELIABLE?

Our business model is to give collectors a list of options and to let real clients & colleagues leave feedback via reviews. A company may have a beautiful website or be extremely friendly when you meet with them at an art fair, but that does not mean they have the best expertise, client service or competitive fees. It is impossible for a single person to vet all 4,000+ listings, but real clients and colleagues of the listed companies are doing the vetting via reviews. We have many companies with glowing reviews, but also have other companies with the opposite. As The Clarion List grows, so too will our number of reviews – better enabling collectors to choose the right provider for them.

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YOU HAVE ORGANIZED THE DIRECTORY TO TARGET NOT ONLY CATEGORIES OF SERVICE BUT ALSO LOCATION, NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES AND YEARS IN BUSINESS. IT MAKES IT INVALUABLE.

WHAT ARE THE CATEGORIES OF SERVICE? DO YOU FIND THAT THE DEMAND FOR SPECIFIC AREAS OF PROFESSIONAL INPUT DIFFER FROM STATE TO STATE?

Our goal was to create a searchable and sortable database, not just a A-Z list. We have 35 categories – from art consultants, galleries, appraisers, private dealers, storage companies, conservators to more niche categories like art lighting firms, lenders, leasing companies, PR specialists and more. Many categories also have subcategories, so you can sort out impressionist & modern specialists from old master specialists, for example.

Across the board, art consultants, appraisers, transport/storage/logistics companies, art galleries and private dealers searches see the most traffic; but then again, those are categories also have the most listings.

IN THE NEXT POST, JESSICA WILL PROVIDE DESCRIBE SEVERAL USER PROFILES AND THE INNUMERABLE WAYS IN WHICH THE CLARION LIST CAN BE OF SERVICE.

WE WELCOME QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS, SO PLEASE,  FIRE AWAY!

The Clarion List, a unique directory of art service providers, with co-founder and CEO Jessica Paindiris

 

AS TECHNOLOGY HAS ADVANCED BY PHENOMENAL LEAPS AND BOUNDS IN THE LAST DECADE, IT HAS INFILTRATED EVERY ASPECT OF OUR LIVES AND THE ART INDUSTRY IS NO EXCEPTION. TECHNOLOGY HAS CHANGED THE WAY WE VIEW, MARKET AND BUY ART, VISIT GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS. IT OFFERS US AN ENCYCLOPEDIC VIEW OF THE ART EXHIBITIONS AND FAIRS HELD AROUND THE WORLD. WHILE A SELECTION OF APPS AND WEBSITES  HAVE BEEN SUCCESSFUL IN THIS HIGHLY COMPETITIVE FIELD, PROVIDING A WIDE RANGE OF SERVICES FROM HOSTING AUCTIONS, OFFERING CURATED LINKS OF ARTISTS WHOSE WORK IS SIMILAR IN STYLE AND VIRTUAL TOURS OF GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS IN EVERY MAJOR INTERNATIONAL CITY.

UNTIL THE CLARION LIST WAS ESTABLISHED IN 2015, HOWEVER, WE ALL STILL DEPENDED ON WORD OF MOUTH FOR REFERRALS FOR ART SERVICES CRUCIAL TO DEALERS, COLLECTORS AND GALLERISTS ALIKE! NO SINGLE RESOURCE EXISTED TO REVIEW, SEARCH AND FILTER THROUGH THOUSANDS OF ART SERVICES COMPANIES:  ART CONSULTANTS, APPRAISERS, FRAMERS, STORAGE AND TRANSPORT, AUCTION HOUSES, AND E-COMMERCE PLATFORMS, TO NAME A FEW.

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THE CLARION LIST VETS THE ART SERVICES IT LISTS PROVIDING RATINGS AND REVIEWS, A BRILLIANT IDEA METICULOUSLY CONCEIVED AND FOUNDED BY TWO ART WORLD PROFESSIONALS, JESSICA PAINDIRIS AND GAIA BANOVICH. THE DIRECTORY IS A GREAT SOURCE NOT ONLY FOR A WIDE RANGE OF PRACTICAL SERVICES BUT ALSO SERVES AS AN ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO NAVIGATE THE EVER-INCREASINGLY COMPLICATED TERRAIN OF OUR INTERNATIONAL ART MARKET.

https://www.clarionlist.com

IT IS A PLEASURE TO INTRODUCE CO-FOUNDER AND CEO OF THE CLARION LIST, JESSICA PAINDIRIS, TO THE LRFA BLOG.

JESSICA, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR CONTRIBUTION. I AM SO IMPRESSED BY YOUR LAUNCH AND ITS SUCCESS AND LOOK FORWARD TO HEARING ABOUT THE DEVELOPMENT OF YOUR COMPANY AND THE SERVICES IT PROVIDES.

HOW DID YOU BECOME INTERESTED IN ART? DOES YOUR FAMILY COLLECT AND DID YOU HAVE EXPOSURE TO MUSEUMS AND THE ART WORLD GROWING UP?

Hi Leslie, happy to speak with you! While my family did not collect, both my maternal grandparents were artists. My grandmother, Joan Heston, has won dozens of awards for her work, was president of Allied Artists of America, has served on many art association boards and taught at Silvermine School of Art. My grandfather, Charles Heston, was an artist for the Navy before launching his own advertising business in NYC.

Jessica Paindiris Co-Founder & CEO

Jessica Paindiris
Co-Founder & CEO

AT YALE, YOU ELECTED TO STUDY THE ART MARKET. WAS THIS PART OF A BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND MARKETING PROGRAM OR A MORE ACADEMIC ART HISTORICAL APPROACH?

This was an academic/passion pursuit! I entered Yale planning to be a math major, but after taking my first history of art survey course, quickly fell in love with the major, especially modern and contemporary art.

WHAT PATH DID YOUR PROFESSIONAL CAREER TAKE PRIOR TO FOUNDING THE CLARION LIST?

Although I was interested in a job in the arts, I was under the (false) impression that the only major options were sales positions for galleries or auction houses, which was not for me (I wish I knew of the dozens of art industry categories and career paths like we list on The Clarion List!). Instead, my career has focused on marketing; I led the marketing department for a top commercial real estate company (since acquired by Cushman & Wakefield) before transitioning to Christie’s.

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YOUR BUSINESS PARTNER, GAIA BANOVICH, HAS AN ACCOMPLISHED PROFESSIONAL HISTORY IN THE FIELD OF STRATEGIC BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT. WHEN AND HOW DID YOU MEET AND HOW DID THE IDEA FOR THE CLARION LIST DEVELOP?

Gaia and I met while at Christie’s. While there, we discovered this gap in the marketplace. Our clients would ask us for outside referrals and we would have to rely on our Rolodex, based on people we’d met briefly months or years ago. There was no free, one-stop resource for finding new companies and checking for quality by reading reviews from real clients. We felt the art world needed its own Yelp – and the idea was born!

WHAT WERE YOUR PROFESSIONAL ROLES AT CHRISTIE’S AND WHAT INSPIRED THE IDEA OF THE CLARION LIST?

Gaia was VP, Business Development Manager and Jessica was AVP, Marketing Manager. Because of our marketing & sales background, we realized that The Clarion List would not only benefit collectors and their advisors looking to source an art service company, but would also empower art companies to reach a global audience in need of their services.

WHAT WAS THE TIME FRAME, IN THIS PARTICULAR INSTANCE, THAT IT TOOK TO TURN AN IDEA INTO AN ENTREPRENEURIAL REALITY? WHAT WERE THE STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT TO LAUNCH THE CLARION LIST?

unknownWe decided to “quit our day jobs” and focus on The Clarion List full-time in spring 2014. We wrote and rewrote our business plan, found angel investment, and worked with our developers to bring it life. We launched our beta site with NYC listings in May 2015.

AND NOW YOU’VE ALREADY EXTENDED THE SERVICE DIRECTORY TO INCLUDE EUROPEAN CITIES!

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, JESSICA WILL INFORM US ABOUT THE START-UP OF THE CLARION LIST AND ITS MISSION. SHE IS A UNIQUE EXPERT IN THE AREA OF 2.0 MARKETING TO THE ART WORLD. TAKE ADVANTAGE OF HER PRESENCE ON THE LRFA BLOG – YOUR QUESTIONS WILL BE ANSWERED, YOUR COMMENTS MUCH APPRECIATED.

Turon Expo Chicago

EXPO CHICAGO 2016 September 22 – 25, 2016

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Bursting onto the art scene in 2012, EXPO CHICAGO is an important fair for your calendar. The Fifth International Exposition of Contemporary and Modern Art, EXPO CHICAGO offers works from 140 leading galleries from around the world. EXPO CHICAGO also features a unique section, EXPOSURE, that affords younger galleries the opportunity to participate in a major international art fair. IN/SITU provides exhibiting galleries a showcase for large-scaled installations and site specific works installed at Navy Pier’s celebrated Festival Hall and as public art installations along the Lakefront and throughout Chicago neighborhoods.

http://www.expochicago.com/expo-chicago-2016

THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO WELCOME BACK NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER, FOUNDER AND PRINCIPAL OF TURON TRAVEL, THE ART WORLD’S TRAVEL AGENCY. TURON WORKS WITH A GROWING NUMBER OF INTERNATIONAL ART FAIRS, ART AND ANTIQUES FAIR AND SPECIAL ARTS EVENTS. SINCE IT WORKS WITH SO MANY GALLERIES, COLLECTORS AND MUSEUM CURATORS THAT BENEFIT EACH OF THE FAIRS, TURON IS ABLE TO OFFER EXCELLENT ACCOMMODATIONS AND AIRFARES TO ITS CLIENTS AND WARM PERSONAL SERVICE FROM ITS STAFF.

https://www.turontravel.com

THROUGHOUT THE 2016-2017 ART SEASON, THE LRFA BLOG LOOKS FORWARD TO POSTING CONTRIBUTIONS BY NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER,  RICHLY INFORMATIVE TRAVELOGUES  ON SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS, RESTAURANTS, MUSEUMS, AND EVENTS THAT WILL ENHANCE YOUR VISITS TO SOME OF THE MANY INTERNATIONAL ART FAIRS.

THANK YOU NICHOLAS!

 

Nicholas Christopher Founder and principal of TURON TRAVEL

Nicholas Christopher
Founder and principal of TURON TRAVEL

 

EXPO CHICAGO should have another very successful year.

Chicago in bursting at the seams with Arts venues. While you’re there, take advantage of the chance to view MASTER DRAWINGS UNVEILED: 25 YEARS OF MAJOR ACQUISITIONS at the ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO. Chicago is renowned for its collection of master drawings in both public and private collections. This exhibition highlights works from the 17th to mid-20th Century that have been acquired by the museum but never before shown to the public.

http://www.artic.edu/exhibition/master-drawings-unveiled-25-years-major-acquisitions

Master Drawings Unveiled: 25 Years of Major Acquisitions Art Institute of Chicago

Master Drawings Unveiled: 25 Years of Major Acquisitions
Art Institute of Chicago

This past December, the ART INSTITUTE reopened its contemporary art galleries, unveiling its largest gift in the Institute’s 136 year history from philanthropist collectors Stefan Edlis and Gael Neeeson, . These 44 paintings, sculptures, and photographs transform the museum’s presentation of contemporary art, bringing a new depth and perspective to the Art Institute’s already strong holdings and making this collection one of the strongest of any encyclopedic art museum in the world.

http://www.artic.edu/exhibition/master-drawings-unveiled-25-years-major-acquisitions

At the MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART at 220 East Chicago Avenue, don’t miss the closing days of a major museum survey of Kerry James Marshall, an exhibit that will travel to the Met in New York. Marshall has long been an inspired and imaginative chronicler of the African-American experience. Best known for his large scaled figurative works, Marshall synthesizes a broad range of pictorial traditions that confront stereotypical representations of black people in society.

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL: MASTRY April 23 - September 24, 2016 Museum of Contemporary Art

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL: MASTRY
April 23 – September 24, 2016
Museum of Contemporary Art

https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2016/Kerry-James-Marshall

Don’t miss the DEPAUL ART MUSEUM on West Fullerton’s exhibition “On Space and Place: Contemporary Art From Chicago, Los Angeles, Mexico City and Vancouver”. The  DePaul Art has partnered with the Peabody Award-winning documentary series ART21 to exhibit the sixteen artists featured in the show’s new season. “On Space and Place” considers how the characteristics and identity of a city can influence the artwork that is made within it while also examining the intersecting concerns of the works from each of the four cities. Rather than grouping the artists geographically, the exhibition explores the thematic and material relationships between the artists to address themes that transcend particular locations such as peace and social violence; race, power, and identity; informal economies and corporate impact on the environment; memory; architecture, light and space.

On Space and Place: Contemporary Art from Chicago, Los Angeles, Mexico City, and Vancouver DE PAUL ART MUSEUM Barbara Kasten Transposition 1, 2014

On Space and Place: Contemporary Art from Chicago, Los Angeles, Mexico City, and Vancouver
DE PAUL ART MUSEUM
Barbara Kasten
Transposition 1, 2014

http://museums.depaul.edu/exhibitions/upcoming/

Stop and have a well-deserved drink at THE PENINSULAR CHICAGO without feeling guilty about taking a break from your art trek. The Peninsula Chicago and Circa 1881 present a special exhibition of HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE BETH DE WOODY COLLECTION curated by Laura Dvorkin, installed throughout the public areas of the hotel.

Ralph Polumbo Love Stream #2

Ralph Polumbo
Love Stream #2

Welcoming you to the exhibition is “Love Stream #2” by Randy Polumbo, a vintage Airstream trailer whose interior has been transformed into an astonishing colorful garden of hand blown glass and light sculptures, on view in front of the hotel’s main entrance and open to the public daily.

http://expochicago.com/beth-rudin-dewoody-collection-peninsula-chicago

MANA CONTEMPORARY

MANA CONTEMPORARY

And before you leave, make time to visit MANA CONTEMPORARY OPEN STUDIOS, on South Throop. MANA CONTEMPORARY is a leading arts destination, home to dozens of artists studios and exhibition spaces. Mana serves as a hub for many of the city’s strongest artists working in many disciplines: painting, sculpture, photography, dance, film, sound and performance.

http://www.manacontemporarychicago.com/

Chicago is a food as well as art destination, but one of the particularly unique and outstanding restaurants in the Lincoln Park neighborhood of Chicago, is ALINEA. According to Zagat:

ALINEA

ALINEA

Following a complete overhaul of both the setting and the cuisine, Grant Achatz’s acclaimed Lincoln Park New American offers three tiers of top-flight tasting menus (some more experimental than others) with optional wine pairings and ticket price breaks for off-peak hours. Gutted and reimagined, the posh space features modern art, elaborate crown molding and smart, neutral decor that varies in each of the discrete dining areas (the glass-enclosed kitchen table being the priciest).

https://www.alinearestaurant.com/

FRIEZE AND FRIEZE MASTERS IS EARLY THIS YEAR – OCTOBER 6 – 9th- THE LRFA BLOG LOOKS FORWARD TO INSIDER TIPS FROM NICHOLAS ON WHAT TO DO IN  LONDON- ALWAYS A WELCOME DESTINATION!

IF THERE ARE SPECIFIC CITIES AND ART FAIRS THAT YOU’D ENJOY LEARNING MORE ABOUT, PLEASE LET US KNOW. WE HAVE AN EXPERT, NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER, OF TURON TRAVEL, ON TAP!

THANKS FOR READING!

 

 

The Art of Childhood: Predicting Artistic Brilliance

Pablo Picasso, age 9 Bullfight with pigeons

Pablo Picasso, age 9
Bullfight with pigeons

IN JUNE 2006, THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION IN WASHINGTON OPENED AN EXHIBITION, WHEN WE WERE YOUNG: NEW PERSPECTIVE ON THE ART OF THE CHILD. CURATED BY JONATHAN FINEBERG, A SCHOLAR OF MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART, THE EXHIBITION  POSED THE QUESTION OF WHETHER THE DRAWINGS OF A GIFTED CHILD PREDICT FUTURE GENIUS. TO THIS END, WORKS BY PREEMINENT ARTISTIC MASTERS SUCH AS KLEE, PICASSO AND MIRO WERE JUXTAPOSED WITH MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY CHILDREN’S DRAWINGS.

“I wanted people to ask themselves to what extent the criteria they use to look at children’s drawings is the imposition of an adult eye,” said Jonathan Fineberg. “It’s not just that Picasso could render well, because you could teach anybody to do that.”

http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520250437

PREDICTING ARTISTIC BRILLIANCE, A CONTRIBUTION BY DRS. ELLEN WINNER AND JENNIFER DRAKE TO SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN MIND, AND THANKS TO THE AUTHORS’ GENEROSITY, POSTED IN THE LRFA BLOG, OFFERS EXTENSIVE RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION ON THIS SUBJECT OF CONTINUING INTEREST BY BOTH PSYCHOLOGISTS AND ART CONNOISSEURS. THIS STUDY NOT ONLY DELINEATES THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THOSE WHO ARE ARTISTICALLY PRECOCIOUS AS CHILDREN BUT OFFERS BENCHMARKS TO DETERMINE THEIR CREATIVE TALENT AS ADULTS.

 

Paul Klee, age 4-6 Woman with Parasol 1883-1885

Paul Klee, age 4-6
Woman with Parasol
1883-1885

PART FIVE

A Rage to Master

Arrian draws constantly and compulsively. So do the precocious realists. This kind of rage to master cannot be taught, cajoled or forced. The children we study often have to be dragged away from their preferred activities to eat, sleep, go to school or be sociable. The desire to work so hard comes from within, and it almost always occurs when a child can achieve at high levels with relative ease. The interest and drive cannot be separated from the talent.

Most gifted child artists do not become artists as adults, of course. Many individuals have displayed skill in their early work as great as that of Picasso, yet only one person became Picasso. The age at which extreme realism emerges is also not predictive: Klee’s drawings at age six were less realistic than those of some of the children whose work is reprinted in this article, yet he is among the greats.

Sci Amer Mind Images (12-15-11) 2jpg_Page6

Gifted individuals may choose not to pursue art for many reasons, but one explanation might have to do with the child’s underlying motivation. Some precocious realists seem more interested in understanding nature—drawing is their tool. Rocco Roth and Joel Gibb exemplify this mindset. Both boys pore over nature encyclopedias and field guides. Rocco, currently six years old, is passionate about insects, seeds, leaves and vegetables. He collects specimens and then draws and labels every one. Joel, who is 12 years old, has memorized the Kaufman Field Guide to Birds of North America and makes meticulous copies of these drawings. These children may eventually become scientists rather than artists.

Field Guides to Birds of America

Field Guides to Birds of America

Beyond a realistic drawing skill, we have identified five other commonalities that are likely to be predictive of becoming an artist. The child’s drawingshave an interesting, arresting composition and decorative, aesthetic features or expressive power. The child shows a hunger to look at art, whether in museums or books, and hence manifests a deep interest in art. The young artist also has enormous drive—a rage to master. Finally, and perhaps most important, the child has a desire not just to make excellent art but to be original and innovative.

OPTICAL REALISM ACHIEVED BY ADOLESCENCE

OPTICAL REALISM ACHIEVED BY ADOLESCENCE

 

We can even speculate that realistic drawing skill might not be necessary. Because so few nonrealistic child prodigies have been identified, we do not yet know the answer to this question. Children who paint abstractly may be more unconventional and playful. They may more readily think out of the box and are thus perhaps more likely than the realists to think like true artists.

Ernst Gombrich Art and Illusion

Ernst Gombrich
Art and Illusion

 

As art historian Ernst Gombrich wrote in Art and Illusion, a classic text on the history of art from a psychological perspective, realism is only one thin slice of the art that humans have produced over the centuries. There may be more than one route to a career in art—one that begins with a striving toward realism and another that emerges from a nonrepresentational exploration of form and color. As studies of children gifted not only in art but also in math, science, languages, chess and athletics have shown, what really predicts high achievement is the lucky combination of an ease of learning, an obsessive focus and a deep motivation to pursue an activity.

SO MANY THANKS TO DRS. ELLEN WINNER  AND JENNIFER DRAKE FOR THEIR SUPPORT OF THE LRFA BLOG.

THROUGHOUT THE YEAR, NICHOLAS CHRISTOPHER, FOUNDER AND PRINCIPAL OF TURON TRAVEL, THE ART WORLD’S GO-TO TRAVEL AGENCY, WILL BE CONTRIBUTING TO THE LRFA BLOG, POSTING TIPS TO ART FAIR TRAVELERS TO ENRICH THEIR STAY.OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG FEATURE CHICAGO IN ANTICIPATION OF EXPO CHICAGO, SEPTEMBER 22-25, AT CHICAGO’S NAVY PIER.

IN OUR NEXT SERIES, THE LRFA BLOG WELCOMES THE OPPORTUNITY TO INTRODUCE THE CLARION LIST.  FOUNDED IN 2015 BY FORMER CHRISTIE’S EXECS JESSICA PAINDIRIS AND GAIA BANOVICH, THE CLARION LIST IS A STUNNINGLY WELL-ORGANIZED AND COMPREHENSIVE ONLINE RESOURCE FOR ART SERVICE COMPANIES WORLDWIDE – WHAT A BRILLIANT IDEA!

 


Further Reading

◆ Normal and Anomalous Representational Drawing Ability in Children. Lorna Selfe. Academic Press, 1983.

◆ Eytan: The Early Development of a Gifted Child Artist. Claire Golomb in Creativity Research Journal, Vol. 5, No. 3, pages 265–279; 1992.

◆ Gifted Children: Myths and Realities. Ellen Winner. Basic Books, 1996.

◆ “Autistic” Local Processing Bias Also Found in Children Gifted in Realistic Drawing. Jennifer E. Drake et al. in Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 40, No. 6, pages 762–773; June 2010.

◆ Children Gifted in Drawing: The Incidence of Precocious Realism. Jennifer E. Drake and Ellen Winner in Gifted Education International. Published online May 18, 2012.

◆ Watch Arrian, a precocious nonrepresentational artist, draw in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyJB0shXoD0&feature=feedu

Read the rest of this entry »

Talented Toddlers, creating abstract art

Wassily Kandinsky Composition 8, July 1923 Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Wassily Kandinsky
Composition 8, July 1923
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

WASSILY KANDINSKY, RUSSIAN ARTIST AND ART THEORIST, IS CREDITED WITH PAINTING THE FIRST MODERN ABSTRACT WORKS.  IN DECEMBER 1911,  HE PUBLISHED A PIONEERING WORK, CONCERNING THE SPIRITUAL IN ART, A CLASSIC AND SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTION TO THE HISTORY OF MODERN ART. IN THIS TRACT, KANDINSKY PROPOSED A VIRTUAL REVOLUTION IN PAINTING, ENCOURAGING ARTISTS TO EXPRESS THEIR OWN INNER LIVES IN ABSTRACT, NON-MATERIAL TERMS RATHER THAN THE REPRESENTATIONAL WORLD AROUND THEM. HE EXPLORED THE PSYCHOLOGY OF COLORS, THE LANGUAGE OF FORM AND COMPOSITION, AND DEFINED THE MEANING AND PHILOSOPHY OF NONOBJECTIVISM IN ART.  IN THE 20th CENTURY, ABSTRACTION TRANSFORMED THE LANGUAGE OF ART PROVIDING A MORE INTELLECTUALLY AND PSYCHOLOGICALLY DEMANDING PLATFORM THAN REPRESENTATION.

IN PREDICTING ARTISTIC BRILLIANCE, DRS. ELLEN WINNER AND JENNIFER DRAKE INVESTIGATE ABSTRACTION IN THE ART WORK OF THE ARTISTICALLY GIFTED CHILDREN. THEY CONCLUDE THAT THESE CHILDREN MAY ACTUALLY SEE THE WORLD DIFFERENTLY THAN OTHERS AND WILL DISCOVER ADVANCED COMPOSITIONAL TECHNIQUES MANY YEARS BEFORE THEIR PEERS. THE SUBJECT OF CREATIVITY IN ALL ITS FORMS IS EXPLORED AND THE LIKELIHOOD OF A CHILD’S PURSUIT OF ART AS AN ADULT IS PREDICTED. IN AN EARLY 1997 PUBLICATION, GIFTED CHILDREN, MYTHS AND REALITIES, DR. ELLEN WINNER DOCUMENTS NINE MYTHS ABOUT GIFTEDNESS. 20 YEARS OF DEDICATION AND COMMITMENT TO THIS SUBJECT LATER, THIS ARTICLE UNDERLINES THE NEED ON THE PART OF PARENTS AND THE COMMUNITY TO CULTIVATE ART EDUCATION OUTSIDE OF THE SCHOOL’S LIMITED CURRICULUM.

THE LRFA BLOG IS PLEASED TO CONTINUE ITS POST OF THE ARTICLE. THANK YOU ELLEN AND JENNIFER!

PART FOUR

NONREPRESENTATIONAL PAINTERS

We suspect, however, that producing works in a naturalistic style is not the only way to demonstrate artistic brilliance. Although most Western children identified as gifted in drawing have come to our attention by virtue of their precocious realism, some talented children have mastered a non- realistic style instead. Psychologist Claire Golomb of the University of Massachusetts Boston has described these children, whom she called “colorists,” as showing an awareness of form and quality and a concern with decorative and expressive aspects of color, texture and design. These artists are more difficult for an untrained eye to spot because their drawings may look similar to the charming, nonrealistic paintings of typical preschoolers.


TALENTED TODDLERS?

Parents sometimes believe that their two-year-old is a prodigy because they notice the similarity of their child’s painting to that of an abstract expressionist master. Gallery owners, too, have been fooled by such paintings. In 2011, for example, four-year-old Aelita Andre had an exhibit in New York City and was touted as a genius on a par with Jackson Pollock and Wassily Kandinsky. These works, however, are age-typical, and we cannot yet call their maker artistically gifted—even if we find the paintings pleasing and superficially similar to works by abstract expressionists. (The film My Kid Could Paint That, directed by Amir Bar-Lev, asks whether parents and gallery owners are fooling the public into thinking these works are signs of genius.)

Aelita Andre, Painter Prodigy

Aelita Andre, Painter Prodigy

Other children, however, truly are precocious artists. Parents can nurture such giftedness when it exists. In the early years parents can encourage art-making behavior, provide high-quality art supplies, and take the child to museums and expose him or her to the range of styles in which artists have worked. Given the lack of attention and time devoted to art education in most schools, the opportunity to study art formally outside of school very likely is critical if the child is to go on to become an artist. In 2011 curator Ayala Gordon reported that almost all the 31 Israeli artists whose childhoods she studied had begun taking art lessons outside of school with artist-teachers by age 10. It was in these classes that they began to identify themselves as artists and to discover others like themselves. —J.E.D. and E.W.


We have recently discovered a child, whom we classify as artistically gifted, whose paintings are entirely nonrepresentational. His process does not resemble that of his peers, nor do his works. Several days shy of his second birthday, Arrian began to create colorful abstract drawings on large, 18- × 24-inch pages using Crayola markers, concentrating intensely. He usually works on each drawing for a day and a half to two days. He fills the entire space densely and meticulously. As his mother describes it:

One session for Arrian is typically a cycle through whatever set of markers he is using at the time. So,if he has a set of 24 he will  systematically go through each marker one by one…. He often begins with some circles all over the page and long flowing lines. . . . Once he has his basic drawing he colors it in systematically—almost in quadrants.

Non-representational painting Arrian, age 2 years 3 months

Non-representational painting
Arrian, age 2 years 3 months

A few months later his mother noted:

Ari is obsessed with making circles—he tries for hours to make the smallest, tightest, thinnest circles he can do. He tries all kinds of ways of holding the marker … experiments with putting his face really close to the page. He likes to dangle the marker to get a thin feather line but then tries with his fist to get a tighter circle—to hold it properly to gain control, and ultimately [he] seems to want to achieve some combination of all three to get the look he wants. He’s been doing this all day for a week—sometimes with just one or two colors.

When Arrian turned three, he discovered view- finders. For two weeks he carried around a comb through which he inspected the world. He also started drawing people at this time, right on track with typical development. Notably, he was not ahead of the curve in representational skill. He was, however, advanced in intensity: after drawing one face—a circle with eyes—he went on to draw about 400 more smiling visages, all in one sitting. The systematicity, intensity, focus and meticulous care with which Arrian draws set him apart from the typical two-year-old scribbler. None of the precocious realists we have studied show anything like Arrian’s behavior—they progressed rapidly to representational drawings and showed no interest in nonrepresentational art.


Sci Amer Mind Images (12-15-11) 2jpg_Page6

THE NEXT SECTION EXPLORES THE COMMON CHARACTERISTICS OF ARTISTICALLY BRILLIANT CHILDREN THAT PREDICT WHO IS LIKELY TO BECOME AN ARTIST – COMPELLING THEORY FOR GALLERISTS, COLLECTORS AND ARTISTS ALIKE!

THANK YOU, ELLEN AND JENNIFER, FOR YOUR CONTRIBUTION, AND THANK YOU ALL FOR FOLLOWING THE LRFA BLOG, YOUR COMMENTS AND SUPPORT!

The artistically gifted child: A Different Way of Seeing

At age two years and three months, Arrian worked for five days to create this 18- x 24-inch painting. He used Crayola markers sometimes drawing with the right hand and sometimes with the left.

At age two years and three months, Arrian worked for five days to create this 18- x 24-inch painting. He used Crayola markers sometimes drawing with the right hand and sometimes with the left.

 

WE LIVE IN A WORLD IN WHICH MANY PARENTS OF DIVERSE CULTURAL BACKGROUNDS ARE FANATIC IN GIVING HTEIR CHILDREN EVERY OPPORTUNITY TO SUCCEED.  THEY WANT TO RAISE CHILDREN WHO ARE SOCIALLY SKILLFUL,  ACADEMICALLY ACCOMPLISHED AND SCHOLASTICALLY ADVANCED.  THANKS TO GREAT ADVANCES NOT ONLY IN CHILD PSYCHOLOGY BUT ALSO IN NEUROSCIENCE, STUDIES INCREASINGLY PRESENT AND DEBATE PROPER WAYS TO ENCOURAGE CHILDREN TO REACH THESE GOALS.  TWO NEW PUBLICATIONS, RECENTLY REVIEWED IN THE FINANCIAL TIMES, RESPECTIVELY QUESTION THE VALUE OF THE MICROMANAGING “TIGER MOTHER” APPROACH AND LOOK AT THE HISTORY OF SUCCESSFUL PARENTING IN AMERICA.

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/0c9a3f80-5e35-11e6-bb77-a121aa8abd95.html?ftcamp=engage/email/emailthis_link/ft_articles_share/share_link_article_email/editorial

ELLEN WINNER, Ph.D., AS PROFESSOR AND CHAIR OF PSYCHOLOGY AT BOSTON COLLEGE AND SENIOR RESEARCH ASSOCIATE AT HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, AND AS DIRECTOR OF THE ARTS AND MIND LAB, HAS CONTRIBUTED HER EXTENSIVE RESEARCH AND FINDINGS ON COGNITION IN THE ARTS IN TYPICAL AND GIFTED CHILDREN AS WELL AS ADULTS FOR OVER TWO DECADES.

A RECENT CONTRIBUTION TO SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, WITH CO-AUTHOR, JENNIFER DRAKE, Ph.D., PREDICTING ARTISTIC BRILLIANCE, STUDIES THE ARTISTICALLY PRECOCIOUS CHILD. THE LRFA BLOG IS PLEASED TO CONTINUE ITS POST OF THIS ILLUMINATING ARTICLE.

PART THREE

a) Typical tadpole drawing of human, age 3 b) Two people dancing, by Grace, age 3 c) photo of Grace

a) Typical tadpole drawing of human, age 3
b) Two people dancing, by Grace, age 3
c) photo of Grace

Precocious realists begin to draw representationally by age two, at least one year ahead of most children. The artworks of typically developing youngsters are abstractions: an apple is captured with a slash, a human body with a circle, a horse’s body with a square. Precocious realists produce works that are much more optically convincing.

These children discover on their own how to create the illusion of 3-D using depth cues—foreshortening, occlusion, size diminution, shading to convey form and, the most difficult technique of all, linear perspective—years before most of their peers. In a comparison of typical and precocious artists published in 1995, psychologist Constance Milbrath, now at the University of British Columbia, observed that half of the children in the precocious group used foreshortening, in which lines not parallel to the picture plane are drawn shorter, in their artworks by ages seven and eight. Typically developing children reached comparable levels only by ages 13 and 14.

An avid 12-year-old naturalist, Joel Gibb displays artistic talent but may be using drawing as a tool to understand nature. He may become a scientist instead.

An avid 12-year-old naturalist, Joel Gibb displays artistic talent but may be using drawing as a tool to understand nature. He may become a scientist instead.

The ability to draw realistically at an early age marks the childhoods of many recognized artists. Artist and curator Ayala Gordon observed naturalism in the childhood compositions of 31 Israeli artists. Many famous artists’ early drawings have been singled out for their advanced realism, too, including Picasso, John Everett Millais, Edwin Henry Landseer, John Singer Sargent, Paul Klee and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Picasso recalled one of his first drawings in this way: “I was perhaps six…. In my father’s house there was a statue of Hercules with his club in the corridor, and I drew Hercules. But it wasn’t a child’s drawing. It was a real drawing, representing Hercules with his club.”

Complex Layered drawing by Arkin (a) Drawing by the adult Picasso showing similar layering (b)

Complex Layered drawing by Arkin (a)
Drawing by the adult Picasso showing similar layering (b)

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

HE DESIRE TO WORK SO HARD AT SOMETHING COMES FROM WITHIN.
A CHILD’S INTEREST AND DRIVE CANNOT BE SEPARATED FROM THE TALENT.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Different Way of Seeing

We set out to discover what cognitive differences might give these children their edge. Their skill is not a matter of intelligence. As we reported in 2010, we have observed no relation between realistic drawing ability and IQ. This finding is bolstered by the cases of autistic “savants” with low IQs, such as Nadia, a child discovered at age six who demonstrated phenomenal artistic prowess despite severe learning disabilities, and Stephen Wiltshire, a man with autism who could draw elaborate cityscapes from memory after only a brief exposure to a scene.

What we have found instead is that children who draw realistically at an above-average level differ in their perceptual abilities. They have strong observational skills and seem to be able to just see the shapes of things, including the distortions that occur as objects recede into depth and diminish in size. A typical child might see a road as having parallel sides because she knows that a road’s edges are parallel, whereas an artistically gifted child overrides her knowledge about the road and sees its sides converging in the distance.

The Block Design Test

The Block Design Test

Early artistic aptitude is also strongly associated with the ability to focus on the parts of an object or scene rather than on the whole. To examine this idea, we used a visual and motor skills test called the Block Design Task. Children were asked to arrange red and white blocks to match a given pattern. We gave this task once in traditional format and once with the pattern segmented to reveal where the block boundaries should be. All participants did well on the segmented version. Children with realistic drawing ability, however, performed much better than other kids on the unsegmented version, presumably because they could mentally divide a complex form into its parts with ease.

 

They also performed better on a task in which they were asked to detect small shapes hidden within figures, a skill that requires analyzing a form by its elements. We hypothesize that a focus on component parts characterizes the process by which realistic artists draw. They may create a complex drawing not by first sketching the global outline but by building up their drawings part by part. Thus, they may both process and generate a scene with a more local focus than do nonartists.

This local-processing bias is also seen in children with autism. In 1993, for example, psychologists Amitta Shah, now a consultant, and Uta Frith of University College London found that autistic children performed equally well on both versions of the Block Design Task. Although a local-processing bias is commonly thought of as a characteristic of autism, our work has found that this proclivity is predicted not by the presence or absence of autism but only by the ability to draw realistically.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, THE AUTHORS EXPLORE THE AREA OF NON-REPRESENTIONAL ART. AS ABSTRACTION IS USUALLY CONSIDERED MORE SOPHISTICATED AND ASSOCIATED WITH CREATIVITY IN ADULT ARTISTS, THESE ARTISTICALLY PRECOCIOUS “COLORISTS’ SHOW A HIGHLY DEVELOPED SENSE OF FORM AND COMPOSITION.

PLEASE JOIN US!

 

The Rage To Master: talent and motivation in artistically brilliant children

Sculpture Garden, Weatherspoon Art Museum

Sculpture Garden, Weatherspoon Art Museum

HARRIET WISEMAN ELLIOTT WAS A PIONEER IN WOMEN’S RIGHTS AND THE SUFFRAGETTE MOVEMENT AND SERVED IN THE 40s AS PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTEE UNDER THE ROOSEVELT ADMINISTRATION. AT THE TIME  OF HER DEATH IN 1947, THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA IN GREENSBORO ESTABLISHED THE HARRIET ELLIOTT SOCIAL SCIENCE FORUM TO HONOR THIS DISTINGUISHED AND INNOVATIVE PROFESSOR OF  POLITICAL SCIENCE AND DEAN OF WOMEN WHO TAUGHT ON THE CAMPUS FROM 1913 UNTIL 1935.

Matisse Drawings: Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection Jun 25, 2016 – Sep 18, 2016

Matisse Drawings: Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection
Jun 25, 2016 – Sep 18, 2016

IN APRIL OF THIS YEAR, DR. JENNIFER DRAKE,  CO-AUTHOR WITH ELLEN WINNER, Ph.D., PROFESSOR AND CHAIR OF PSYCHOLOGY AT BOSTON COLLEGE, OF THE STUDY OF PREDICTING ARTISTIC BRILLIANCE WAS INVITED TO SPEAK ON THIS SUBJECT AT THE UNIVERSITY’S PRESTIGIOUS HARRIET ELLIOTT LECTURE SERIES.

Henri Matisse: Selections from the Claribel and Etta Cone Collection Jun 25, 2016 – Oct 16, 2016

Henri Matisse: Selections from the Claribel and Etta Cone Collection
Jun 25, 2016 – Oct 16, 2016

HELD AT THE UNIVERSITY’S WEATHERSPOON ART MUSEUM, A STRONGHOLD OF MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ART THAT INCLUDES WORKS FROM THE DILLARD COLLECTION OF ART ON PAPER  AND THE ETTA AND CLARIBEL CONE COLLECTION OF PRINTS AND BRONZES BY MATISSE, JENNIFER INTRODUCED HER LECTURE AS FOLLOWS:

 

Some young children are able to create stunningly realistic drawings that resemble those of adult artists. In this talk, I present research examining the perceptual and cognitive skills that underlie this talent. 

Sketches by Arkin Rai (age 6) showing layering, foreshortening and linear perspective.

Sketches by Arkin Rai (age 6) showing layering, foreshortening and linear perspective.

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG IS PLEASED TO POST PART II OF THE ARTICLE.

Exceptional realism, such as that displayed by Arkin, is one important sign, but it is not the whole story. Not all adult artists drew as convincingly as Arkin when they were his age, and some young children are now being discovered who show a skill for producing nonrepresentational art, rather than realistic works. We have identified five other characteristics that we believe foretell artistic creativity. A budding artist’s drawings are often well composed and display either a decorative, colorful aspect or an expressive power. The child also has a hunger to look at art, possesses an enormous drive to create and wants to be original. Last, we contend that outstanding artists, and perhaps geniuses in all domains, not only possess innate talent but also are intrinsically motivated in a way that others may not be—something we call the rage to master.

Arkin Rai Age 6

Arkin Rai
Age 6

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

FAST FACTS

Motivated to Master

I. Artistically gifted children may see the world differently than other youngsters do. They discover advanced compositional techniques many years before their peers.

II. These precocious children tend to be self-motivated and deeply interested in honing their skills.

III. These early signs and others are helping researchers to predict which children are likely to pursue art as adults.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Birth of a Skill

Scientists and educators have long sought to demystify the emergence of expertise, artistic and otherwise. Many researchers have argued that exceptional  achievement can be boiled down simply to hard work—about 10,000 hours of it. Studies of eminent scientists in the 1950s supported this view by underscoring the individuals’ capacity for endurance, concentration and commitment to effortful practice. Benjamin Bloom, a prominent education psychologist who studied mastery, wrote in 1985 that none of his subjects achieved expertise without a supportive environment and a long and intensive period of training. This education came first from encouraging instructors and later from demanding master teachers. A few years later psychologist K. Anders Ericsson of Florida State University conducted studies of experts in piano, violin, chess, bridge or athletics. The investigations revealed that a person’s level of achievement correlated strongly with the amount of practice put in.

A typical two year old's drawing of two apples using two lines.

A typical two year old’s drawing of two apples using two lines.

These studies, however, have not been able to tease apart hard work and innate ability. The children with the most talent may also be the ones most interested in an activity, who begin to develop their skills at an early age and who work the hardest at it. Committing time and energy to a task likely is easier when advancement comes quickly but not when every step is a painful struggle.

FAST FACTS

_____________________________________________________________________________________

PRECOCIOUS ARTISTS BEGIN TO DRAW REPRESENTATIONALLY BY AGE TWO

AT LEAST ONE YEAR AHEAD OF MOST CHILDREN, WHO DRAW ABSTRACTIONS.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

 

A precocious two-year-old draws a circular line to capture contour.

A precocious two-year-old draws a circular line to capture contour.

We have tackled this question by examining the earliest signs of artistic talent. Researchers have long assumed that the first inkling of it in humans, and especially in the young child, is the ability to portray the three-dimensional world realistically on a two-dimensional surface. Art historians have been struck by the realism of cave paintings done by our Paleolithic forebears, leading many to assume that this style is the most natural form of art. Although most children’s drawings are schematic, certain youngsters, including some with autism, can draw in a highly naturalistic fashion from a very early age, mirroring those paintings done by our ancestors. We refer to children who show an early ability to draw in this manner as precocious realists, and we now know a great deal about their developmental trajectory.

IN THE NEXT LRFA POST, THE ARTICLE EXPLORES THE SOPHISTICATED PICTORIAL TECHNIQUES ADOPTED BY ARTISTICALLY BRILLIANT CHILDREN.

UNTIL THEN, THANK YOU FOR READING!

Predicting Artistic Brilliance: a study of the gifted child with Ellen Winner and Jennifer Drake

MoMA Art Lab

MoMA Art Lab

 WHAT IS GIFTEDNESS?  THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR GIFTED CHILDREN states:

Giftedness, intelligence, and talent are fluid concepts and may look different in different contexts and cultures. Even within schools you will find a range of beliefs about the word “gifted,” which has become a term with multiple meanings and much nuance.  Gifted children may develop asynchronously: their minds are often ahead of their physical growth, and specific cognitive and social-emotional functions can develop unevenly.  Some gifted children with exceptional aptitude may not demonstrate outstanding levels of achievement due to environmental circumstances such as limited opportunities to learn as a result of poverty, discrimination, or cultural barriers; due to physical or learning disabilities; or due to motivational or emotional problems.  This dichotomy between potential for and demonstrated achievement has implications for schools as they design programs and services for gifted students.

IN 1996, ELLEN WINNER, Ph.D. PUBLISHED A STUDY ON THE GIFTED CHILD AND HAS CONTINUED TO CONTRIBUTE HER FINDINGS, RESEARCH AND INSIGHT ON THIS SUBJECT. THE STUDY DETERMINED THAT CHILDREN THAT WHO ARE HIGHLY GIFTED IN AN ART FORM FACE MANY OF THE SAME PROBLEMS FACED BY ACADEMICALLY GIFTED CHILDREN.
TODAY’S  LRFA BLOG IS HONORED TO PRESENT  PREDICTING ARTISTIC BRILLIANCE, A RECENT 2012 CONTRIBUTION ON THE CHARACTERISTICS THAT PREDICT TALENT AND GENIUS, PUBLISHED BY ELLEN WINNER, Ph.D, AND CO-AUTHOR JENNIFER DRAKE, Ph.D. IN SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN MIND.
ai went from creating abstract, schematic drawings (this page, left) to learning several ad- vanced techniques, such as occlusion (this page, right). His sketches (opposite page) show layering, foreshortening and linear perspective. 

Rai, age 3,  creating abstract, schematic drawings 

A “RAGE TO MASTER”, AS OBSERVED IN SOME PRECOCIOUS YOUNG ARTISTS, MAY HELP DEFINE EXTREME VISUAL CREATIVITY
by Jennifer E. Drake and  Ellen Winner

Arkin Rai, a seven-year-old child living in Singapore, draws dinosaurs with exquisite realism. At age three his dinosaurs were simple and schematic. A year and some months later, however, he created a complex drawing in which dinosaurs were layered one on top of the other, an image that bears an uncanny resemblance to a drawing of horses and a bull by the adult Pablo Picasso.

In Arkin’s fanciful scene, the long, graceful neck of an Apatosaurus-like beast obscures the view of other dinosaurs. One of them is a Tyrannosaurus rex, drawn in profile with one leg mostly hidden behind another—an effect called occlusion, which most children discover at age eight or nine. In the ensuing months his drawings became shockingly realistic. He started using fluid contour lines to give figures shape. At age six he was depicting dinosaurs fighting and running, using various advanced methods to convey the distance between objects.

Rai, age 4 years, 7 months, demonstrating several advanced techniques such as occlusion.

Rai, age 4 years, 7 months, demonstrating several advanced techniques such as occlusion.

Most adults cannot draw anywhere near as realistically as Arkin can, and we are in awe of such technical virtuosity in a young child. Although we cannot know if Arkin will develop into a professional artist, his drawings and those of children like him are helping us study the emergence of artistic ability. By examining the artworks of gifted children and the early compositions of adult artists, we and other researchers have begun to predict who will display great visual creativity later in life. Our studies of young artists may also offer insight into the development of mastery more generally.

Rai, age 4 years, 7 months

Rai, age 4 years, 7 months

IN THE NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, DRS. WINNER AND DRAKE WILL DESCRIBE THE HISTORY OF RESEARCH ON THIS SUBJECT AND IDENTIFY CHARACTERISTICS THAT FORETELL ARTISTIC CREATIVITY.

PLEASE JOIN US!

 

BIOS
ELLEN WINNER, Ph. D

ELLEN WINNER, Ph. D

Ellen Winner is Professor and Chair of psychology at Boston College and Senior Research Associate at Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education. She directs the Arts and Mind Lab, which focuses on cognition in the arts in typical and gifted children as well as adults. She is the author of over 100 articles and three books—Invented Worlds: The Psychology of the Arts (1982), The Point of Words: Children’s Understanding of Metaphor and Irony (1988), and Gifted Children: Myths and Realities (1997) and co-author of Studio Thinking: The Real Benefits of Visual Arts Education (2007) and Studio Thinking 2: The Real Benefits of Visual Arts Education (2013).

She has served as President of APA’s Division 10, Psychology and the Arts in 1995-1996, and received the Rudolf Arnheim Award for Outstanding Research by a Senior Scholar in Psychology and the Arts from Division 10 in 2000. She is a fellow of APA Division 10 and of the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics.
JENNIFER DRAKE, Ph. D

JENNIFER DRAKE,
Ph. D

Jennifer Drake is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology with a minor in Statistics from Boston College. Her research program focuses on emotion regulation and the arts in children and adults. In a second line of research, she studies the cognitive and perceptual processes underlying graphic representation skill in artistically gifted children. Her research is funded by grants from the National Endowment of the Arts, the Imagination Institute supported by the John Templeton Foundation, and PSC-CUNY. Her research has been featured in Scientific American Mind, The Atlantic, the Wall Street Journal, and on National Public Radio.

Looking forward with Max Teichner of Gagosian Gallery

Piero Golia, Loser, 2003. Courtesy the artist, Bougada & Cargnel, Paris. "PAR TIBI, ROMA, NIHIL" at the Nomas Foundation, Roman Forum and Palatine Hill Rome, Italiy

Piero Golia, Loser, 2003. Courtesy the artist, Bougada & Cargnel, Paris.
“PAR TIBI, ROMA, NIHIL” at the Nomas Foundation, Roman Forum and Palatine Hill
Rome, Italiy

WELL-RECEIVED EXHIBITIONS IN INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED MUSEUMS ADD INCOMPARABLE STATURE TO A CONTEMPORARY ARTIST’S REPUTATION. THE COLLECTING PUBLIC AND ART MARKET IS ENCOURAGED BY THIS CRITICAL  AND CURATORIAL ACCLAIM. THE MUSEUM OR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION’S RECOGNITION OF AN ARTIST WHO IS CONTINUING TO PRODUCE OFFERS COLLECTORS, CURATORS AND THE ART GOING PUBLIC THE OPPORTUNITY TO UNDERSTAND HOW AN ARTIST’S PRACTICE EVOLVED AND CONNECT FURTHER WITH THE WORK.  THE ART BOOM AND PUBLICITY SURROUNDING RECORD PRICES AT AUCTION AS WELL AS THE DEMOCRATIZATION OF ART THANKS TO ONLINE AUCTIONS, INSTAGRAM, INTERNATIONAL FAIRS THAT ARE A MIX OF SOCIAL EVENTS, CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP AND ART, AS WELL AS THE OVERALL GENERAL GROWTH OF GLOBAL WEALTH, HAVE SIGNIFICANTLY BOOSTED MUSEUM ATTENDANCE.

FRANCIS BACON MONACO AND FRENCH CULTURE JULY 02ND 2016 PRESS RELEASE ARTIST INFO "Francis Bacon, Monaco and French Culture," Installation view at the Grimaldi Forum, Monaco. © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved. Photo by JC Vinaj/Grimaldi Forum,

FRANCIS BACON
MONACO AND FRENCH CULTURE
JULY 02ND 2016
PRESS RELEASE
ARTIST INFO
“Francis Bacon, Monaco and French Culture,”
Installation view at the Grimaldi Forum, Monaco.
© The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved.
Photo by JC Vinaj/Grimaldi Forum,

GAGOSIAN ARTISTS HAVE  STRONG INTERNATIONAL ATTENTION IN THE MUSEUM SECTOR OF THE ART WORLD. THIS SUMMER ALONE, THE DE YOUNG IN SAN FRANCISCO PRESENTS ED RUSCHA AND THE GREAT AMERICAN WEST; IN MONACO, THE GRIMALDI FORUM PRESENTS THE WORK OF FRANCIS BACON FROM A UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE: THE INFLUENCE OF FRENCH CULTURE DURING BACON’S MONEGASQUE PERIOD.

"Sterling Ruby," installation view at The Winter Palace at the Belvedere, Vienna, Austria. Artworks © Sterling Ruby Studio. Photo by Sophie Thun

“Sterling Ruby,” installation view at The Winter Palace at the Belvedere, Vienna, Austria. Artworks © Sterling Ruby Studio. Photo by Sophie Thun

A SURVEY OF THE ICONOCLASTIC WORK OF STERLING RUBY IGNITES THE GRAND ROOMS OF THE WINTER PALACE AT THE BELVEDERE, VIENNA, A STARTLING JUXTAPOSITION AND COMMENTARY  ON THE CELEBRATION OF WARFARE EXPOUNDED THROUGHOUT THE BUILDING.  IN FRANKFURT, GERMANY, THE STAEDEL MUSEUM OFFERS A COMPREHENSIVE EXHIBITION OF GEORG BASELITZ’S CELEBRATED “HEROES” SERIES.

Georg Baselitz, The Shepherd, 1966, oil on canvas, 63 13/16 × 51 3/16 inches (162 × 130 cm) © Georg Baselitz 2016, courtesy Museum Frieder Burda, Baden-Baden. Photo by Jochen Littkemann, Berlin

Georg Baselitz, The Shepherd, 1966, oil on canvas, 63 13/16 × 51 3/16 inches (162 × 130 cm) © Georg Baselitz 2016, courtesy Museum Frieder Burda, Baden-Baden. Photo by Jochen Littkemann, Berlin

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG IS VERY PLEASED TO SPEAK WITH MAX TEICHER OF GAGOSIAN GALERY ABOUT ITS CURRENT EXHIBITIONS AND FUTURE PLANS.

MAX, THANK YOU. GAGOSIAN GALLERY HAS ORGANIZED EXHIBITIONS OF THE SCOPE AND SIGNIFICANCE THAT ARE OFTEN ONLY FOUND IN A MUSEUM.  WHAT ARE SOME OF THESE EXHIBITIONS AT THE GALLERY THAT WERE THE MOST MEANINGFUL TO YOU AND WHY?

"In the Studio: Paintings" Curated by John Elderfield Installation view February 17 - April 18, 2015 Photo by Rob McKeever

“In the Studio: Paintings”
Curated by John Elderfield
Installation view
February 17 – April 18, 2015
Photo by Rob McKeever

Ever since we’ve been collaborating with distinguished curators, it has allowed us to serve as both an artist venue and educational venue for collectors and art enthusiasts. Specifically exhibitions like In the Studio Photographs and In The Studio Painting brought together some artists that we don’t typically show or represent.

Curated by John Elderfield and Peter Galassi, the subject of the artist’s studio in works of art is a very large one with a long history: The spaces where art is made, and the means by which it is made in that space, have proved fascinating to both its creators and its viewers. The aim of this pair of exhibitions is to explore important themes in the development of the subject within these two mediums.

In the Studio: Photographs Curated by Peter Galassi CHARLES RAY Plank Piece I–II, 1973 Gelatin silver prints mounted on rag board, in two parts © Charles Ray. Photo by Rob McKeever

In the Studio: Photographs
Curated by Peter Galassi
CHARLES RAY
Plank Piece I–II, 1973
Gelatin silver prints mounted on rag board, in two parts
© Charles Ray.
Photo by Rob McKeever

HOW WOULD YOU ANALYZE THE MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN THE ART WORLD SINCE YOU BEGAN AT GAGOSIAN? WHAT DIRECTION DO YOU THINK WE CAN NOW ANTICIPATE?

In my eight years here I can confidently tell you that the contemporary art world has expanded significantly with more galleries, more collectors, and more exhibited artists. This is wonderful in all aspects and I see this only increasing with time. More eyes on art allows the art world to be less intimidating and more inviting to new collectors.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE EXHIBITIONS WE CAN LOOK FORWARD TO AT GAGOSIAN IN THE MONTHS AHEAD?

I am excited by the recent opening of our San Francisco gallery. The inaugural exhibition is Plane.Site.

Cy Twombly Untitled, 2003 Acrylic, oil, and wax crayon on handmade paper © Cy Twombly Foundation Photo by Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly
Untitled, 2003
Acrylic, oil, and wax crayon on handmade paper
© Cy Twombly Foundation
Photo by Rob McKeever

PLANE.SITE  a cross-generational exhibition of modern and contemporary artists organized by Sam Orlofsky to inaugurate the San Francisco gallery.

“Plane.Site” explores the dynamic exchanges between drawing and sculpture, in the work of artists from the modern post-war period to the present day. To that end, each participating artist is represented by a work in both two and three dimensions.

Cy Twombly Untitled (Lexington), 2009 Wood, white paint, cardboard, yellow acrylic, plastic strings 21 × 12 × 9 1/2 inches (53.3 × 30.5 × 24.1 cm) © Cy Twombly Foundation Photo by Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly
Untitled (Lexington), 2009
Wood, white paint, cardboard, yellow acrylic, plastic strings
21 × 12 × 9 1/2 inches (53.3 × 30.5 × 24.1 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation
Photo by Rob McKeever

I hope everyone visits the new space when they travel to San Francisco!

MAX, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR ABSOLUTELY TERRIFIC CONTRIBUTION.

IN OUR NEXT POST, THE LRFA BLOG IS VERY PLEASED TO WELCOME BACK PROFESSOR ELLEN WINNER, PROFESSOR AND CHAIR OF PSYCHOLOGY AT BOSTON COLLEGE, AND HER CO-AUTHOR, JENNIFER DRAKE, PH.D., ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY AT BROOKLYN COLLEGE, CUNY, WITH THEIR RECENT ARTICLE ON PREDICTING ARTISTIC BRILLIANCE – CERTAINLY A TOPIC OF INTEREST TO COLLECTORS AND CURATORS ALIKE!

THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!

HAPPY SUMMER!

Roy Lichtenstein Sinking Sun

Roy Lichtenstein
Sinking Sun