Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

INTERNATIONAL ART ADVISORY SERVICE

Art Business Conference, London September 4th, book now!

Church House Conference Centre, London

THE ART BUSINESS CONFERENCE IN ITS FIFTH YEAR IN LONDON IS IMMINENT, A MUCH ANTICIPATED GATHERING FOR SENIOR ART MARKET PROFESSIONALS. LEADING EXPERTS FROM THE ART WORLD JOIN FORCES WITH BUSINESS LEADERS AND TECHNOLOGY EXPERTS TO SHARE THEIR INSIGHTS ON THE BUSINESS OF ART. FOUNDED AND DIRECTED BY LOUISE HAMLIN, INTRODUCED IN OUR LAST POST, THIS WEEK THE LRFA BLOG POST IS PLEASED TO PROVIDE THE DETAILS OF THE NEXT LONDON MEETING BEFORE RETURNING TO LOUISE’S INTERVIEW.

JUST AS A PICTURE IS WORTH 1000 WORDS, THE AGENDA OF THIS PROGRAM SHOWS WHAT A PROFOUNDLY PRODUCTIVE DAY THIS WILL BE. HELD ON TUESDAY, 4th SEPTEMBER 2018, AT THE CHURCH HOUSE CONFERENCE CENTRE, WESTMINSTER, LONDON, THE 2018 AGENDA IS AS FOLLOWS:

9.00 – 10.00: Delegate registration and breakfast networking in the Business Pavilion and Media Lounge  

10.00: Opening remarks from the conference chair, Georgina Adam

Georgina Adam has spent more than 30 years writing about the art market and the arts in general.  She was editor of the Art Market section of The Art Newspaper 2000-2008, then editor at large.  She writes a weekly column on Saturday for the Financial Times. In addition to her specialisation in the art market, Adam is particularly interested in emerging cultural centres.

Michael Ellis is Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Arts, Heritage and Tourism.

10.00-10.15: Opening Keynote Speech: Michael Ellis, Minister for Arts, Heritage and Tourism. 

10.15 – 11.15: Because it’s worth it – Valuing Contemporary Art: Contemporary art can be the most volatile market in the art world. But who decides what it is worth? And how? Four specialists in this area – a gallerist, collector, Valeria Napoleone, a dealer on the secondary market and Ralph Taylor, Global Head of Post-War and Contemporary Art at Bonhams – discuss how values are established from the artist’s degree show to appearing on the block at auction. Also up for consideration is how societal shifts in politics and world geography can make an impact on the careers – and value – of certain artists’ work. This session will be moderated by Melanie Gerlis (Financial Times)

Valeria Napoleone is an art collector and patron to a select number of arts organisations. She is Head of the Development Committee at London based not for profit gallery Studio Voltaire

11.15 – 11.30: Morning refreshment break and networking in the Business Pavilion and Media Lounge

ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING AND TIMELY TOPICS IN TODAY’S ART MARKET IS THE USE OF BLOCKCHAIN AS A TRANSPARENT MEANS TO ESTABLISH THE OWNERSHIP HISTORY OF A WORK OF ART. IN THIS YEAR’S ABC LONDON CONFERENCE, THIS SUBJECT WILL BE EXPLORED IN DEPTH BY A PANEL OF VERY KNOWLEDGABLE ART AND TECHNOLOGY EXPERTS.

11.30 – 12.30: Provenance and the Blockchain: Issues and Future Visions:  This panel explores the topic of provenance and due diligence in the art market. The session will open with an introduction to the blockchain and this will be followed by a discussion that will assess current approaches to ownership history and investigate the likely future impact of blockchain technologies on the market.  Issues we seek to explore include:

  • What is the current state of provenance research in the art market?
  • What impact might the digitisation of catalogues raisonnés have on approaches to provenance?
  • Could the blockchain revolutionise how we address provenance in the future?
  • Should we be seeking an international industry standard for the recording of provenance in catalogues raisonnés, auction catalogues and archives?
  • Can provenance research be applied to the market for antiquities and cultural heritage?
  • How can collectors be encouraged to engage with the importance of provenance, particularly as prices rise and risks multiply?
  • How might artists be affected by these new technological developments?
  • To what extent might such emerging technologies disrupt traditional approaches to art business more generally?  Speakers: Robert Upstone, (Robert Upstone Ltd), Jess Houlgrave (Codex Protocol) and Gareth Fletcher, (Sotheby’s Institute), moderated by Tom Flynn (Flynn & Giovani)   
  • Gareth Fletcher is a Lecturer in the MA Art Business and Unit Leader of the Art Crime, and Art and its Markets summer study programmes at Sotheby’s Institute of Art.

Codex is a decentralized registry for unique assets like art, fine wines, watches and more. Use cryptocurrency to buy $6 billion of art and collectibles today, and plug into a growing ecosystem of third-party services. Codex stores an item’s identity securely on the blockchain as a Codex Record. We make it easier to buy, sell and manage assets of all kinds.

https://codexprotocol.com/

12.30 – 12.55: Presentation: The Fifth Anti-Money Laundering Directive – what does this mean for the art trade? 

This session will ask: why us?  What the AML regulations seek to prevent & how do they do it?  Who is required to comply with the regulations?  What does compliance involve? Plus Practical issues for KYC, understanding the transaction, source of funds & risk assessments.  This practical session will offer guidance and advice.  It is now relevant to any business selling works of art in transactions valued at €10,000 or more, regardless of the payment method used. 

Speaker: Mathilde Heaton (RAM – The Responsible Art Market Initiative) and Adrian Parkhouse (Farrer & Co)

Legal Counsel (UK, Europe & Asia), Phillips Auctioneers
Lawyer and Art Law Consultant, Art Law Advisory
Responsible Art Market Initiative, Taskforce member

12.55 – 13.00: Presentation: Have We Taken the Commoditisation of Art a Step Too Far? Speaker: (Willis Towers Watson) 

Willis Towers Watson (NASDAQ: WLTW) is a leading global advisory, broking and solutions company that helps clients around the world turn risk into a path for growth. With roots dating to 1828, Willis Towers Watson has over 40,000 employees serving more than 140 countries.

LET’S JOIN THE ART BUSINESS CONFERENCE FOR ITS LUNCH AND NETWORKING BREAK AND DISCUSSION TABLES AND RETURN IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST TO THE AFTERNOON SESSION. IN THE MEANTIME YOU CAN MAKE YOUR PLANE AND HOTEL RESERVATIONS!

AND FOR THOSE OF US STUCK ON THIS SIDE OF THE POND, THERE IS ALWAYS THE GREAT NEW YORK ART BUSINESS CONFERENCE NEXT SPRING, AT TIME WARNER, TO ANTICIPATE.

 

 

 

A force for good: The Art Business Conference with founder Louise Hamlin

Louise Hamlin
Founder and Director
The Art Business Conference

ART CONFERENCES AND PANELS ABOUND, USUALLY HELD IN CONJUNCTION WITH AN ART FAIR, OR A MUSEUM ASSOCIATION OR ACADEMIC GATHERING SUCH AS THE COLLEGE ART ASSOCIATION WHICH ANNUALLY BRINGS TOGETHER SCHOLARS IN THE FIELD OR CONVERSATIONS AT MIAMI ART BASEL WHICH FEATURES PANEL DISCUSSIONS WITH LEADING ARTISTS, COLLECTORS AND GALLERISTS.

THE ART BUSINESS CONFERENCE, HOWEVER, IS UNIQUE IN ADDRESSING THE CONCERNS OF EVERY ASPECT OF THE ARTS FROM A BUSINESS PERSPECTIVE. LEADING LAWYERS WHO SPECIALIZE IN INTERNATIONAL ART AND CULTURAL PROPERTY ISSUES, HEADS OF ARTIST ESTATE FOUNDATIONS, GLOBAL INSURANCE BROKERS, INTERNATIONAL ART SHIPPING AND TRANSPORT EXPERTS, FOUNDERS OF INTERNET ART PLATFORMS SUCH AS ARTSY, ART FAIR ORGANIZERS SUCH AS THE DISTINGUISHED CHAIRMAN OF MASTERPIECE, LONDON SERVE ON PANELS ORGANIZED BY FOUNDER AND DIRECTOR, LOUISE HAMLIN, AND ADDRESS THE TOPICS THAT CONCERN EVERYONE IN THE ART WORLD. THE DISCUSSIONS, BOTH PROVOCATIVE AND EDUCATIONAL, AND NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES KEEP US INFORMED AND CURRENT ON THE BUSINESS OF ART.

ARCIS

THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO WELCOME LOUISE HAMLIN, FOUNDER OF THE ART BUSINESS CONFERENCE AND ART MARKET MINDS.

THE ART BUSINESS CONFERENCE IS AN EXTRAORDINARY PLATFORM TO GAIN EXPERTISE IN EVERY ASPECT OF THE BUSINESS OF ART FROM EXPERT PANELISTS GATHERED TOGETHER  BY LOUISE HAMLIN, FOUNDER AND DIRECTOR. INITIATED IN LONDON IN 2014 AND HELD IN NEW YORK AS WELL FOR THE LAST TWO YEARS, IT IS THE LEADING FORUM TO DISCUSS THE KEY ISSUES THAT CONCERN OUR GLOBAL ART MARKET. THE ROSTER OF KEYNOTE SPEAKERS AND THE SUBJECTS UNDER DISCUSSION ARE TIMELY, INFORMATIVE AND INVALUABLE IN PROVIDING INSIGHT FOR RUNNING AN ART BUSINESS OR FOR COLLECTING WITH SKILL AND INSIGHT.

LOUISE, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR TAKING TIME FROM YOUR VERY BUSY SCHEDULE TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE LRFA BLOG.

WHAT IS YOUR PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND IN THE ARTS? WHAT WAS YOUR CAREER PATH PRIOR TO ORGANIZING THE ART BUSINESS CONFERENCES IN LONDON AND NEW YORK?

I studied History of Art at the Courtauld Institute and worked for The Art Newspaper for 14 years, ultimately as Head of Sales, before starting Art Market Minds in 2014, the business behind the Art Business Conference.  My whole career has been in the Art world and I have been lucky enough to work with a great many people from a wide variety of businesses within it.

HOW DOES THE ART BUSINESS CONFERENCE SUPPORT AND ADD TO THE BUSINESS OF THE PROFESSIONALS THAT ATTEND?

The professionals who attend the conference come from a broad range of businesses across the art market.  The conference provides the opportunity not just to learn about different issues in the market but hopefully offers practical insight and guidance to art businesses and those running an art collection today.  It is also a good opportunity for delegates to meet with one another, network, and actively tap into each others’ expertise.

WHO IS THE TARGET AUDIENCE AND WHAT IS THE MAIN FOCUS OF THE CONFERENCE?

Senior Art Market professionals are the target audience but the conference is open to anyone who works or is interested in working in the Art Market.  The main focus of the conference is to bring together art market professionals to discuss the key issues affecting the global art world and to share insights. All our delegates are busy working professionals, so we have to offer something that not only educates but provides plenty of opportunities to network. 

Protecting the Artist’s Legacy
Art Business Conference

FOR THE GALLERY OWNER, PRIVATE DEALER OR ADVISOR, WHAT ARE TOPICS OF SPECIAL INTEREST?

You have highlighted right there the diverse range of people who work in the Art Market but my hope is that the areas of special interest we cover have broad appeal: whether a gallery owner or an advisor, listening to, and meeting with, specialist service providers including lawyers, insurers and curators,  shippers, art storage providers and IT security experts, will be at the very least, thought-provoking and at best, inspire best practice across the art market.

FOR THE COLLECTOR, WHAT ARE SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS OF THE CONFERENCE?

The conference wants to be a force for good in today’s art market. When the art trade is covered in the press, it is more often covering negative stories. The conference aims to promote best practice in the industry and hopefully this sends a positive message to collectors or new investors in art. There are also practical aspects the conference offers for collectors, as we have a number of exhibitors in our Business Pavilion in both London and New York who offer services to the collector.  In New York 2018, there was Sandra Liotus Lighting Design, offering bespoke lighting solutions for all kinds of delicate art work; the Art Loss Register which can provide full searches on works of art; Veevart and Synergy Associates that build secure IT platforms for data and collection management.

Stolen: The Gallery of Missing Masterpieces
Julian Radcliffe, the head of the Art Loss Register in London, has been the consultant adviser on this important project.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, LOUISE WILL DETAIL THE FORTHCOMING 5th LONDON ART BUSINESS CONFERENCE ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2018, AT THE CHURCH HOUSE CONFERENCE CENTRE, WESTMINSTER, LONDON.

BOOK YOUR RESERVATION NOW!

Essentialist beliefs about artworks by esteemed psychologist , Ellen Winner, Ph.D.

Andy Warhol
Portraits of the Artists
On exhibit at the Neuberger Museum

FIVE MUSEUMS IN THE HUDSON VALLEY IN NEW YORK STATE ARE CURRENTLY EXPLORING UNIQUE ASPECTS OF THE WORK OF ANDY WARHOL. WARHOL X 5 TAKES A LOOK FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES AT THE ARTIST’S ICONIC SERIAL APPROACH TO HIS SUBJECT MATTER IN PRINTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, MULTIPLES, AND VIDEOS. WARHOL REVOLUTIONIZED OUR DEFINITION OF THE PROCESS OF ART-MAKING BY HIS TECHNICAL ADOPTION OF SILK-SCREEN, TRADITIONALLY ASSOCIATED WITH EDITIONS OF PRNITS, IN THE CREATION OF UNIQUE WORKS OF ART.

THIS APPRECIATION, ACCORDING TO THE RESEARCH OF ELLEN WINNER, Ph. D. WHO HAS DEDICATED HER PROFESSIONAL LIFE TO THE PSYCHOLOGY EXPLORATION OF ART, DOES NOT EXTEND TO WORKS BY OTHER ARTISTS. HER TEST CASES DOCUMENT THAT WE PREFER THE “ESSENCE” OF THE CREATOR OF AN ORIGINAL EVEN WHEN A COPY IS IDENTICAL.

IN THEIR STUDY, ESSENTIALIST BELIEFS IN AESTHETICS, DR. WINNER AND HER COLLEAGUES CONCLUDE:

Participants suggested that duplicates made by others lacked the creator’s “heart” or “soul.”  The special quality transferred from artist to artwork resembles the “placeholder” aspect of the representations posited by psychological essentialism—one need not know in what the essence consists in order to believe that it exists and has real causal powers.

In the current experiments, this essence was sufficient to increase evaluative judgments having to do with object history. Interestingly, this essence transfer does not seem to be positive contagion on the standard construal since physical contact is not necessary. And as essentialism predicts, other studies have found that the transferred quality supports inductive inferences about paintings and sculptures but not artifacts with no connection to special creators.

Vincent Van Gogh
Blue Starry Night, 3 D replica

In any case, the philosophical thought experiment of comparing an artwork with its identical copy is no longer hypothetical even for artworks once quite difficult to duplicate: Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum has created 3D printed replicas of the artist’s works complete with identical brushwork and texture, and an unsanctioned 3D scan of an ancient Egyptian statue has been illegally distributed online for anyone to use. The historically recent tension between essentialist beliefs about artworks and the likelihood of encountering such works as duplicates may be a permanent feature of our cultural landscape.

Ancient Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten
3D scan replica

The entire study documented by Ellen Winner, Nathaniel Rabb, and Hiram Brownell appears in the May 24, 2018 issue of Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts

http://Essentialist Beliefs in Aesthetics

SUMMARY Part III

You might think that people disfavored the sanctioned copy because they actually thought this was not fully moral. To check for this, we also had people rate the immorality. But when we controlled for these ratings statistically, the copies by the assistant were still disfavored over the copies by the artist. So we cannot chalk up the disfavoring of assistant copies to anything to do with immorality.

We believe our findings to be consistent with “essentialism,” the belief that certain objects have internal essences – my wedding ring, my late father’s sweater, etc. (Gelman 2013).  There is convergent evidence for this conclusion. People prefer music albums and artists’ screen prints that were printed earlier rather than later in a series. People said that a duplicate sculpture or painting was like the same object as the original when it was made by the artist but not by someone else.

Bottom line: We like to look at original works that we know were made by the artist because it makes us feel like we are communing with the artist’s mind, soul, heart, essence. Forgeries lack this, even if they are identical to the original, and hence just as beautiful.

Gifted Children: Myths and Realities
by Ellen Winner, Ph.D.

THE LRFA BLOG THANKS ELLEN FOR HER CONTINUED SUPPORT AND CONTRIBUTIONS ON THE SUBJECT OF THE NATURE OF PERCEPTION, ONE OF THE BASIC FOUNDATIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ARTS.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, WE ARE DELIGHTED TO INTRODUCE LUCILLE HAMLIN, FOUNDER OF THE ART BUSINESS CONFERENCE HELD IN SEPTEMBER IN LONDON AND IN APRIL IN NEW YORK. LUCILLE ASSEMBLES THE MOST INTERESTING PANELS OF EXPERTS TO SHARE THEIR KNOWLEDGE OF THE BUSINESS OF ART AND HAPPILY WILL SHARE HER EFFORTS WITH US.

PLEASE STAY TUNED!

 

 

Artists imbue their works with a special essence according t with expert Ellen Winner, Ph.D.

Ellen Winner, Ph.D.

IN THE ARTS SECTION OF THE NEW YORK TIMES ON JULY 8, TOM MASHBERG CONTRIBUTED AN ARTICLE ENTITLED ” DO YOU LIKE ‘DOGS PLAYING POKER’? SCIENCE WOULD LIKE TO KNOW WHY”.  ELLEN WINNER, Ph.D., A PSYCHOLOGIST AT BOSTON COLLEGE WAS FEATURED BASED ON HER RECENT RESEARCH AND ARTICLE PUBLISHED WITH TWO COLLEAGUES TO THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EMPIRICAL AESTHETICS IN ANTICIPATION OF A CONVENTION ON ART AND PSYCHOLOGY IN AUGUST 2018.

ELLEN HAS DEDICATED HER LIFE’S RESEARCH TO THIS SUBJECT AND HER CONTRIBUTION TO OUR UNDERSTANDING OF PERCEPTION AND PSYCHOLOGY IN THE ARTS IS LEGENDARY. HER PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE:

Ellen Winner, Ph.D.
Invented Worlds: The Psychology of the Arts

 

THE TIMES WRITES:

The organization whose members initiated much of this research, the Society for the Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts, is a unit of the American Psychological Association that was established in 1945. Its membership has grown consistently over the years and stands at about 500.

A second organization that promotes similar research, the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics, , includes not only psychologists but philosophers, sociologists and neuroscientists. Each group publishes a research journal and both will hold conventions in August.

Ms. Winner’s team at Boston College published its study, “Essentialist Beliefs in Aesthetic Judgments of Duplicate Artworks,” in the society’s journal in June. The research was designed to explore why people come to devalue pieces they had once revered after finding out that the works were not actually created by the artist.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/08/arts/design/do-you-like-dogs-playing-poker-science-would-like-to-know-why.html

An excerpt from “Essential Beliefs in Aesthetic Judgments of Duplicate Artworks”

Philosophers have long been interested in the puzzle of forgery, and consistent with philosophers’ assumptions, laypeople devalue artworks that they believe to have been forged. We found that the second of two identical artworks was rated lower on all evaluative dimensions when made by a forger as opposed to a famous artist, replicating previous results. The question we explored here was why forgeries are devalued.

Identical forgeries constitute a special case of the more general phenomenon of duplication (Currie, 1985), an observation that highlights the many factors present in real cases of forgery. A forged painting previously thought to be by a famous artist is not just a duplicate but a deception and thus the product of an immoral action. Moreover, a forged painting is worth considerably less money than an original, introduces duplication in a medium that normally involves one-of-a-kind objects, and loses its historical specialness by eliminating its previously thought association with a great artist. Any of these factors could plausibly account for its perceived deficiency.

Here we explore the effect of duplication on aesthetic judgments while manipulating (a) the moral character of the act of duplication, (b) the medium of the artworks (painting vs. photography), and (c) the causal-historical specialness acquired by being made by a famous artist. To capture the conditions of the philosophical puzzle without the response demand created by presenting the same artwork first as an original and later as a forgery, we showed participants two identical images presented simultaneously and varied their creators.

Summary, Part II

As expected, forgeries were rated worse on all dimensions. But again, we can’t say whether it was because they’re fraudulent, worth less money, or just not the one the artist made. So the key question was whether people would disfavor sanctioned assistant copies, which are essentially forgeries with the monetary loss and intent to deceive stripped out.

Although people thought the artist’s copy and the assistant’s copy were equally beautiful, they disfavored the assistant’s copy on all of the historical dimensions. What’s surprising about this result is that it’s not rational: why should the second in a series of ten be more influential, creative, or original just because it was made by the artist rather than the sanctioned assistant? Both were conceived by same person (the artist), were made at same time in history, had the artist’s stamp on it, and were said to be worth the same amount of money.

April Gornik
Light Before Heat

This suggests that when we strip away all of the problems with forgery that aren’t art-specific—their worthlessness, their fraudulence—people would still have a problem with them because they’re not made by the original artist. This is consistent with the irrational belief that artists imbue their works with some special essence when they make it. This makes it more original, more creative, and more influential even if it’s not more beautiful.

Remarkably, this irrational devaluation does not depend on physical contact: the results were the same regardless of how much people thought the artist came into contact with the copy

You might think that people disfavored the sanctioned copy because they actually thought this was not fully moral. To check for this, we also had people rate the immorality. But when we controlled for these ratings statistically, the copies by the assistant were still disfavored over the copies by the artist. So we cannot chalk up the disfavoring of assistant copies to anything to do with immorality.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, ELLEN WILL SHARE THE CONCLUSIONS OF THIS STUDY. WE’LL NEVER LOOK AT A WORK OF ART AGAIN WITHOUT WONDERING ABOUT THE CREATIVE PROCESS AND OUR PERCEPTION OF IT.

PLEASE JOIN US!

Forgery! A scientific study by Ellen Winner, Ph.D., an expert in psychology and the arts

Ellen Winner, Ph.D
Professor of Psychology
Boston College

THE ARTS ARE A CENTRAL ASPECT OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR THAT MUST BE INCLUDED IN OUR UNDERSTANDING OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION. NO ONE HAS MADE A DEEPER COMMITMENT TO THIS STUDY THAN ELLEN WINNER, PH.D, PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY AT BOSTON COLLEGE.  ELLEN HAS CONTRIBUTED TO THIS BLOG SEVERAL TIMES. HER RESEARCH FOCUSES ON TWO AREAS OF COGNITION IN THE ARTS: THE STUDY OF THE CREATIVE PROCESS IN THE VISUAL ARTS, THE ROLE OF ART IN STUDENTS’ LIVES AND THE STUDY OF MUSICAL TRAINING ON CHILDREN’S BRAIN GROWTH AND ON THEIR COGNITION.

ELLEN’S MOST RECENT BOOK, HOW ART WORKS: A PSYCHOLOGICAL EXPLORATION HAS A RELEASE DATE OF OCTOBER 21, 2018.

How Art Works: A Psychological Exploration
by Ellen Winner, Ph.D.
Pre-order for October 31, 2018

 

https://www.amazon.com/How-Art-Works-Psychological-Exploration/dp/0190863358/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1531677085&sr=1-2&refinements=p_27%3AEllen+Winner

IT IS WITH GREAT PLEASURE THAT THE LRFA BLOG WELCOMES ELLEN BACK. IN THESE SERIES OF POSTS, SHE WILL SHARE HER RESEARCH ON FORGERY IN ART AND OUR PERCEPTION OF IT. RECENTLY, THE NEW YORK TIMES SECTION ON THE ARTS FEATURED AN ARTICLE ON THE SUBJECT THAT FEATURED ELLEN AND HER RESEARCH. IT FOCUSES ON OUR EVALUATION OF A FAKE VERSUS AN ORIGINAL PAINTING AND OUR REACTION TO THE TWO.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/08/arts/design/do-you-like-dogs-playing-poker-science-would-like-to-know-why.html

PSYCHOLOGY OF AESTHETICS, CREATIVE AND THE ARTS , PUBLISHED THE COMPLETE STUDY BY NATHANIAL RABB, HIRAM BROWNELL, AND ELLEN WINNER, ON MAY 24, 2018 IN THEIR ONLINE JOURNAL. 

HERE IS THE LINK TO THE ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY AND THANKS TO ELLEN’S GENEROSITY, A SUMMARY IN THE NEXT SERIES OF LRFA BLOG POSTS.

https://leslierankow.files.wordpress.com/2018/07/2018-24584-001_rabb.pdf

ESSENTIALIST BELIEFS IN AESTHETIC JUDGMENTS OF DUPLICATE ARTWORKS

May 17 2018

Aesthetic philosophers assume that a forged identical copy of an artwork is aesthetically worse than the original, and experimental evidence suggests that nonphilosophers share the intuition. This presents an apparent puzzle because visually identical artworks might be thought to be equally good works of art regardless of their histories. We examine this puzzle by presenting participants with side-by-side identical images of artworks, labeled “first” and “second” to convey original/duplicate status in morally neutral language, while indicating that the creator of the second was either the same artist, the artist’s assistant, or a forger. Forgeries were devalued relative to artists’ duplicates on all dimensions. Assistants’ duplicates were devalued on historical (e.g., originality) but not broadly evaluative (e.g., beauty) dimensions, even when both duplicates were the second of a series of 10 and thus were equally duplicative. The results are not explained by moral or monetary evaluations and were observed for painting as well as photography, a medium in which duplication is standard practice. The pattern of judgments is consistent with beliefs in individual artifact essences.

Duplication—the creation at time of some object nearly identical to another object existing at time—is now ubiquitous. Images, words, and sounds meant to entertain or inform routinely reach us in copied form; mass-produced artifacts litter the landscape. Does the knowledge that an object is a duplicate affect how we respond to it?

SUMMARY PART I

Why do we care if an artwork is a forged copy? Presumably because we believe that we can see things in the forgery that are not as skilled or beautiful as what we see in the original, and if we placed them side by side, we think we could detect these differences.

But consider a philosophical thought experiment, asking people to imagine two identical artworks, one the original, one a forgery. If they could see no difference, would they care which was the original? And if so, why?

Would they care because the forgery is worth less on the market?

Would they care because a forgery is deceptive in intent, and thus has an unethical taint to it?

Or would they care because they knew that the original was more connected to the artist’s “essence” than the forgery?

Andreas Gursky
Rhein
Photograph, Edition of 10

 

 

We put this question to the test in two experiments, and we report here the results of the second experiment, where we tested a total of 440 participants. We presented two identical images to our participants and said that these were part of a series of 10 identical artworks. Some people saw two identical “paintings;” others saw two identical “photographs.” For everyone, the first image (on the left) was said to be by the artist), but we varied what we said about the second image (on the right): this was said to either be by the artist, by the artist’s sanctioned assistant, or by a forger.

We thought it was important to include a sanctioned copy by an assistant so that we could determine whether the only reasons forgeries are devalued is because they are worth less on the market, or because they are fraudulent (immoral).  

We asked people to compare the second art work to the first art work on broadly evaluative dimensions (beauty, liking, quality), and also on historical dimensions (creativity, influence, originality).

We then compared ratings based on whether the second work was by the artist, the assistant, or the forger. 

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, ELLEN WILL REPORT ON HER FINDINGS.

STAY TUNED!

 

Social media and photography with Yancey Richardson Gallery director, Matthew Whitworth

Mark Steinmetz
Athens, GA (Girl on Hood of Car), 1966
The Photography Show Presented by AIPAD
April 5-8, 2018 Pier 94, New York

IN 2008, THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM CURATED AN EXHIBIT PHOTOGRAPHY: REFLECTIONS ON THE MEDIUM SINCE 1960. THE MUSEUM PRESENTED FOUR DECADES OF PHOTOGRAPHS THAT FOCUSED THE CAMERA ON TO PHOTOGRAPHY ITSELF. IN THE SIXTIES, PHOTOGRAPHY BECAME THE “WEAPON OF CHOICE FOR ARTISTS SUCH AS ANDY WARHOL AND VITO ACCONCI IN BREAKING DOWN THE BOUNDARIES NOT ONLY BETWEEN MEDIUMS BUT BETWEEN ART AND LIFE ITSELF.”

https://www.metmuseum.org/press/exhibitions/2008/photography-on-photography–reflections-on-the-medium-since-1960

THE ROLE OF A GOOD GALLERY IS TO EDUCATE AS WELL AS TO PLACE ITS ARTISTS’ WORK IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE COLLECTIONS. THE EDUCATIVE PROCESS IS ACHIEVED BY CURATING GROUP EXHIBITIONS THAT EXPLORE A THEME OR TECHNIQUE, PRESS RELEASES THAT DOCUMENT BOTH THE TECHNICAL AND THEMATIC ASPECTS OF THE WORKS ON EXHIBIT, LECTURES AND MONOGRAPHS ON THE ARTISTS THEY REPRESENT. YANCEY RICHARDSON NUMBERS AMONGST THE GALLERIES THAT ARE DEEPLY COMMITTED TO CONTINUING THE TRADITION OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND EXPLORING NEW CHALLENGES AND INNOVATIONS IN THE FIELD.

TODAY, WE WELCOME BACK MATT WHITWORTH, DIRECTOR OF YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY, TO CONCLUDE HIS EXCEPTIONAL INTERVIEW ON THE GALLERY AND ON PHOTOGRAPHY ITSELF.

http://www.yanceyrichardson.com/

MATTHEW, DO YOU SEE A PATTERN OR TREND IN TERMS OF IMAGE AND/OR TECHNIQUE WITH THE YOUNGER ARTISTS WHO APPROACH YOU FOR REPRESENTATION OR THAT YOU SEE AT ART FAIRS OR IN STUDIOS?

Other than the ease of working digitally (anyone remember 35mm slides?) I can’t say there is a definite trend that I’ve never seen before.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya
Study for B.H. with Five Figures, 2014-2015
Archival pigment print

BEING: NEW PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 AT MoMA EXPLORES CURRENT PHOTOGRAPHY TRENDS. PAUL MPAGI SEPUYA, AN ARTIST I GREATLY ADMIRE, IS INCLUDED IN THIS INFORMATIVE EXHIBITION.

MATTHEW, HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE HIS WORK, BOTH AESTHETICALLY AND TECHNICALLY, AND HOW DO YOU THINK IT MEETS THE DEFINITION OF NEW PHOTOGRAPHY.

Paul has had quite a year. We showed two distinct bodies of work for his first solo commercial show here at the gallery (actually anywhere) last spring. The main gallery was curated somewhat from his recent senior thesis work from UCLA along with some newer work. The Project gallery had earlier (2014!) work from his Studies series. I think while I loved the main gallery presentation (as did several major photography curators) and how each image “talked” to one another, the Studies work really resonated the most with me. Being a self-proclaimed formalist, I was fascinated by how he was disrupting, compressing, and expanding the notion of pictorial space within the picture plane all though analog processes. A mirror, some tape, a pushpin or two, some strips of photos, all come together to create a certain kind of magic. With the camera always in the same position in each image facing out at us, the constant reference back to photography, the act of photographing and the notion of looking and being looked at, was also intriguing to me.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya
Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon
New Museum
September 2017 – January 2018

Paul is of course speaking to a lot more than that. His work is pushing the identity of the model/photographer/subject/object to new boundaries. I thought his work looked so “clean” and well finished at the New Museum show Trigger: Using Gender as a Tool and a Weapon. It was a big, and somewhat jumbled but important and timely, show where Paul’s artistic maturity really stood out. He’s only 35 but is already exercising a very developed voice. He’s getting quite a bit of press because people are realizing that. It’s going to be so interesting to see how he develops further and where he goes with the next body of work.

https://www.newmuseum.org/exhibitions/view/trigger-gender-as-a-tool-and-as-a-weapon

HOW INFLUENTIAL ARE THE ART FAIRS IN TERMS OF THE EXPANSION OF THE PHOTOGRAPHY MARKET?

They are crucial I think as long as the galleries and dealers that participate continue to expand and develop their programs in new and exciting ways. Showing up to the swap meet with your bins and recycled material just isn’t going to cut it in New York or anywhere else. Paris Photo is an excellent example of how a small fair in the basement of the Louvre became the most important photography venue/destination in the world.

Sharon Core
1661 from the series 1606-1907, 2011
archival pigment print
Paris Photo
Yancey Richardson Gallery

HOW INFLUENTIAL IS THE WEB IN TERMS OF THIS EXPANSION. CLEARLY, PHOTOGRAPHY WILL REPRODUCE MORE EFFECTIVELY THAN SOME OTHER MEDIUMS ON INSTAGRAM, ONLINE AUCTIONS, GALLERY WEBSITES, OR IS THAT ASSUMPTION INCORRECT?

It’s hard to give just one answer with one metric like yes, it’s good we’re seeing 42, but clearly it’s moving things around. We’ve seen good sales from the online platforms for some artists and then are surprised when people just don’t respond to other work online. I always say I’m happy that everything isn’t done out on the web, I’d be out of a job. We don’t fetishize the print but it is what we’re selling after all and most collectors need to see it in real life before they commit.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE EXHIBITIONS WE CAN ANTICIPATE IN THE GALLERY PROGRAM AHEAD?

David Maisel’s abstracted aerial photographs was our most recent exhibition. We’ll be showing new work by a new gallery artist Ori Gersht in the fall and the one I’m most excited about, Mickalene Thomas in early 2019.

Mickalene Thomas
Pulse Art Fair, Miami

WHAT EXHIBITS WOULD YOU LIKE TO CURATE THAT MAY BE TOO IMPRACTICAL AND WHY?

Oh, I’ve got some ridiculously themed ideas I’m still working on. I could tell you but I’d have to kill you. How about the history of bed sheets throughout photography? Uncovered!: A photographic exploration of bed linens in conversation with John Waters.

 

Rachel Perry
Lost in my Life, 2016
archival pigment print


WHAT DO YOU ANTICIPATE FOR THE GALLERY’S DIRECTION AND GROWTH IN THE YEARS AHEAD?

We are always striving to maintain, improve, and grow our current program as well as our relationships with private collectors and museum curators while constantly mining for the new and interesting.

PELLO IRAZU
Borrar 4A, 2015
Interventions
Group Summer Exhibition 2018
Yancey Richardson Gallery, Chelsea

Visit Yancey Richardson Gallery this summer to view Interventions, a group exhibition of photographs that have been physically manipulated or altered, i.e. torn, taped, painted, set on fire. It presents a diverse group of artists ranging from John Baldessari, Gordon Matta-Clark, Vic Muniz and Macao Yamamoto. Introduce yourself to Matthew and have the opportunity to learn even more about the art of photography.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, WE WELCOME BACK ELLEN WINNER, WHOSE RESEARCH FOCUSES ON THE STUDY OF THE CREATIVE PROCESS. WE ARE DELIGHTED THAT ELLEN HAS PERMITTED US TO PUBLISH HER FASCINATING RECENT ARTICLE ON FORGERY, “ESSENTIALIST BELIEFS IN AESTHETIC JUDGMENTS OF DUPLICATE ARTWORKS”, FEATURED IN LAST WEEK’S NEW YORK TIMES.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/08/arts/design/do-you-like-dogs-playing-poker-science-would-like-to-know-why.html

THANK YOU FOR FOLLOWING THE BLOG, YOUR COMMENTS, CONTRIBUTIONS AND SUPPORT!

Photography: past to present with Matthew Whitworth at the Yancey Richardson Gallery

Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher
Pitheads, 1974
Tate Museum

BERND AND HILLA BECHER FIRST BEGAN THEIR PROJECT TO SYSTEMATICALLY PHOTOGRAPH INDUSTRIAL STRUCTURES IN THE LATE 1950s IN RESPONSE TO THE DESICCATION OF THE GERMAN LANDSCAPE DURING WORLD WAR II. KNOWN FOR THEIR RIGOROUS DEVOTION TO THE 1920s NEW OBJECTIVITY MOVEMENT, THE BECHERS’ PHOTOGRAPHS ARE CLEAR, BLACK AND WHITE IMAGES OF SUCH INDUSTRIAL ARCHETYPES AS GRAIN ELEVATORS, WATER TOWERS AND COAL BUNKERS. THEIR RHYTHMIC AND REPETITIVE IMPACT GAINED A BROAD INFLUENCE ON THE WORK OF THEIR SUCCESSFUL STUDENTS AT THE DUSSELDORF ART ACADEMY THAT INCLUDED THOMAS STRUTH, ANDREAS GURSKY, AND CANDIDA HOFER. THEIR IMMERSIVE DOCUMENTARY QUALITY AND THE ADVANCES IN THE TECHNICAL CAPABILITIES OF BOTH PRINTING AND SCALE CONTRIBUTE TO CREATING THE BLURRING OF BOUNDARIES BETWEEN PHOTOGRAPHY AND PAINTING.

THE YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY REPRESENTS A DIVERSE SELECTION OF ABSTRACT, FIGURAL AND LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHERS RESPONDING TO THE LEGACY OF THE DUSSELDORF SCHOOL.

IT IS A PLEASURE TO REGROUP WITH MATT WHITWORTH, DIRECTOR OF YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY, TO DISCUSS BOTH PAST AND PRESENT TRENDS IN PHOTOGRAPHY IN TODAY’S LVRA BLOG.

http://www.yanceyrichardson.com/

MATTHEW, WELCOME BACK!

Larry Sultan
Pictures from Home series
Fixing the Rainbird, 1985

WHO ARE THE PHOTOGRAPHERS THAT HAVE MADE THE LARGEST IMPACT ON THE NEXT GENERATION OF PHOTOGRAPHERS AND IN WHAT WAYS?

It used to be fairly easy to point to Bernd and Hilla Becher and say look at the artists they taught, they are or will be big and important. Now the Dusseldorf School, as it’s more commonly referred to, has had descendants of the descendants. The gestation period is quite quick. Aside from that I think you have to look at who has been copied or emulated. Tina Barney stands out to me. Larry Sultan had a very important, if all too short, working career. With Larry’s Pictures from Home, the biographical nature of photography and what it could say really set a new bar. That show at the Queens Museum and the book are still haunting and almost gut wrenching to me. I see a lot of artists working in very self-referential ways these days and can’t help think if Tina and Larry helped open a lot of doors to that.

Anthony Hernandez
Landscapes for the Homeless

THE GALLERY HAS HAD SUCH A SUBSTANTIAL HISTORY OF EXHIBITIONS THAT HAVE BEEN ACKNOWLEDGED BOTH CRITICALLY AND COMMERCIALLY. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS OF YOUR EXHIBITION PROGRAM?

Thank you very much. I can point to several. I think Anthony Hernandez’s recent show was a huge risk but the work is so good and tough and important and had never been seen in New York. Holland Cotter in the Times called the complete series of Landscapes for the Homeless “one of the most moving in contemporary American photography”. Zanele Muholi’s 2 solo shows of her self portraits have been an amazing experience as far as audience interaction, general buzz and phenomenal sales.

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/16/arts/design/photographs-of-desperate-shadows-cast-by-the-california-sun.html

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO A COLLECTOR JUST STARTING TO EXPRESS AN INTEREST IN COLLECTING?

It’s always collect what you want and need to have. You’ll never miss the money but you’ll always miss the art if you let it get away.  When new collectors ask me how much a print is going to be worth I have to tell them that they are asking the wrong question, a legitimate one but the wrong one. Collecting is about passion so follow that and you’ll always be happy. Also, there is no rush. If you like an artist, and their work in general, but don’t see the right image for you, wait. Chances are they will eventually produce something that strikes you so hard you can’t walk away.

Andrew Moore
Dirt Meridian

DO MOST PHOTOGRAPHY COLLECTIONS HAVE A HISTORICAL ARCH AND IF SO, WHAT IS THE TIMELINE?

Some do and most I deal with don’t. I always thought it was so boring and tedious when collectors who were starting out thought they had to collect from square one in order to build a solid collection. “OK, I need an Atget, check. OK, I need a Cartier Bresson, check,” etc. It’s so much more interesting to help steer a collector who is interested in many things (besides photography) and knows what they want but not exactly how to go about getting it. It’s my job to pair the work with the collector and I always find that stimulating and a great and fun challenge.

ARE THERE SPECIFIC ARTISTS AND/OR PERIODS OF PHOTOGRAPHY THAT ARE IN THE HIGHEST DEMAND?

Right now there is a huge shift towards artists dealing with gender, racial, and sexual identity. Mickalene Thomas, Zanele Muholi, and Paul Mpagi Sepuya are the contemporary artists we represent that are dealing with these issues and whose works are in high demand.

 

Elina Brotherus
Artists at Work 9, 2009
A Room of One’s Own exhibit at Yancey Richardson

HOW DO YOU FIND THE PHOTOGRAPHY MARKET AT A TIME WHEN THE ART MARKET IN GENERAL IS UNDERGOING A CORRECTION?

I don’t think there has been a real “correction” yet. If you look at the only publicly available sales data, the Auction Houses, the numbers seem to be quite healthy. Maybe I’m not seeing the reports you are? The gallery has been able to increase sales year over year since before I joined. One can wonder though, is that due to blind and reckless spending or is it because of the program? Don’t get me wrong, I survived through 2008 and beyond so that is always in the back of my head. I’m keeping an eye on the Dow more than I am Christie’s, Sotheby’s, or Phillips.

Sharon Core
Four Heart Cakes, 2004

CERTAINLY THE PHOTOGRAPHY MARKET HAS GARNERED ITS SHARE OF AUCTION RECORDS, CINDY SHERMAN, RICHARD PRINCE, ANDREAS GURSKY READILY COME TO MIND.  WHAT ARE THE MOST SIGNIFICANT AUCTION RESULTS IN THE PHOTOGRAPHY MARKET AND WHY DO YOU THINK IT IS THAT ARTIST, OR PARTICULAR PHOTOGRAPH COMMANDS THIS KIND OF COMMERCIAL SUCCESS?

The reactions to the Auction House records always frustrate and perplex me because they are in the business of selling things, any and many “things”. They purport to benefitting artist’s careers and their artwork but let’s be realistic, whether it’s a watch, a bottle of wine, or a Picasso, they want the best sales result. The money goes to them and the seller, not the artist. When collectors come to me and say, “Why did this go for such a high price?” all I can really say is that at least 2 people wanted it at the same time. Why would someone (or two people) pay $97,500 for an unlimited edition Sebastiao Salgado when they could have bought the same print from me that morning, during the sale, or even right after it for $50,000. The only benefit to the artist or the gallery is that maybe the prices can be revised to a higher level after a good result but a bad result (possibly due to a lack of promotion on the Auction House’s part) can be a real nuisance. We spend most of our time promoting the artist and their work for the larger picture, if you will. We are in it for the long haul while the Auction Houses are in it for the immediate sale, then on to the next product of death, debt, or divorce.

 

Sebastiao Salgado
Fortress of Solitude

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, MATTHEW WILL SPEAK ON THE EFFECTS OF ART FAIRS AND THE WEB ON THE PHOTOGRAPHY MARKET.

THANK YOU ALL FOR FOLLOWING!

Outside one’s comfort zone: the collector profile with Matthew Whitworth of Yancey Richardson Gallery

Pello Irazu
Installation view
Yancey Richardson Gallery

IN THE AGE OF THE SMART PHONE, EVERYONE IS A PHOTOGRAPHER CONSTANTLY SHOOTING AND SHARING PHOTOGRAPHS, CREATING A DAILY RECORD OF ACTIVITY AND LOCATIONS IN A VISUAL DIARY. HOW DO WE DIFFERENTIATE BETWEEN THIS MULTITUDE OF  IMAGES  AND IMAGE MAKERS THAT WE SEE ON SOCIAL MEDIA OR IN ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS AND THE FINE ART IMAGES FOUND IN A GALLERY OR MUSEUM EXHIBITION?

TO QUOTE PHOTOGRAPHER AND INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY FOUNDER, CORNELL CAPA:

Photography is demonstrably the most contemporary of art forms. It is the most vital, effective, and universal means of communication of facts and ideas between peoples and nations.

ONE ESSENTIAL AREA OF EXPERTISE IS THE KNOWLEDGE OF BOTH THE CREATIVE AND TECHNICAL POSSIBILITIES OF PHOTOGRAPHY, THE BASIC USE OF CAMERAS AND IMAGING SOFTWARE, A SKILL SET THAT INCLUDES CAMERA OPERATION, SHUTTER SPEED, APERTURE, COMPOSITION, IMAGE ENHANCEMENT AND PRINTING. THE SECOND IS MORE ELUSIVE: DEVELOPING A PHOTOGRAPHIC EYE. WITH DEDICATION AND INTENTION, A PHOTOGRAPHER TRANSFORMS EVERYDAY OBSERVATIONS INTO COMPELLING PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIES THAT REFLECT THE ARTIST’S UNIQUE VISION, STATEMENT AND STYLE.

Lux: The Radiant Sea
Installation view
Yancey Richardson Gallery

AT YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY, THESE CRITERIA ARE MET IN THE ROSTER OF ARTISTS THE GALLERY REPRESENTS. DIVERSE IN IMAGE, SUBJECT, INTENT, AND TECHNIQUE, THE GALLERY ARTISTS HAVE BEEN EXTENSIVELY COLLECTED AND EXHIBITED IN MUSEUMS WORLDWIDE AND WIDELY PUBLISHED IN MONOGRAPHS, ART JOURNALS AND CRITICAL TEXTS.

TODAY, MATTHEW WHITWORTH, DIRECTOR AT YANCEY RICHARDSON, WILL SHARE HIS KNOWLEDGE OF THE PHOTOGRAPHY MARKET’S COLLECTOR PROFILE AND HOW IT HAS EVOLVED.

http://www.yanceyrichardson.com/

MATTHEW, WHO ARE THE GALLERY COLLECTORS?  WHAT PERCENTAGE EXCLUSIVELY COLLECT PHOTOGRAPHY AND WHAT PERCENTAGE  ALSO COLLECT IN OTHER MEDIUMS (PAINTING, SCULPTURE)?

That’s a fairly complicated question to answer without a few hours of database research on my end and a few pages of writing but I can defer to the 80/20 rule. That is, about 80 percent of our business comes from about 20% of our collectors. Out of that 20% I would guess 60-80% are primarily or strictly photography collectors.

ZANELE MUHOLI
2017
gelatin silver print

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE COLLECTOR PROFILE WHEN THE GALLERY FIRST OPENED AND HOW HAS IT CHANGED? HAS IT CHANGED IN TERMS OF THE KIND OF PEOPLE THAT ARE COLLECTING AND HAS IT CHANGED IN TERMS OF THE KIND OF PHOTOGRAPHY THEY COLLECT?

It seems that the demographic of the client has broadened quite a bit as well as what they’re looking for. The collectors tended to be older back in “the day” and there often were a lot of decorating needs that were filled by photographs, “I need a wide picture of a landscape” or “I’m looking for photographs of New York City”. Not that there’s anything wrong with that but today I see quite a few seasoned clients, and younger collectors, venturing outside of what you might think their comfort zone is. By following and collecting more intellectually rigorous and emotionally charged work, they are more interested in the artist’s voice, not just the image alone. The works of Zanele Muholi and Paul Mpagi Sepuya are prime examples.

LEWIS BALTZ
New Industrial Parks And Park City
Yancey Richardson Gallery
April 6 – May 12, 2001

IN TERMS OF VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHY, WHO ARE THE PHOTOGRAPHERS THAT THE GALLERY REPRESENTS? WHO RESONATES THE MOST STRONGLY WITH YOU AND WHY?

Well, vintage is often a misused or misunderstood term. It really means a print that was made on or around (usually within 3 years) the time the negative, or file in digital terms, was made. So, we are selling a lot of vintage work by the contemporary photographers we represent. If by vintage you mean “older” I would have to say the 1970s work by Lewis Baltz probably has the most appeal to me. Lewis was way ahead of his time. I’m not really so interested in anything before that period except for Paul Outerbridge.

Victoria Sambunaris
Untitled (Train crossing Great Salt Lake City, Utah), 2016
39 x 55 inches

IN TERMS OF THE MORE CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS THE GALLERY REPRESENTS, IS THERE A CONSISTENCY IN TERMS OF POINT OF VIEW, SUBJECT AND/OR TECHNIQUE?

Yes, they all have to be strong and well thought out. We don’t show work that is on the fence of what it or the artist wants it to be. Sometimes a pretty picture is just that and that’s fine but in the long run the artist has to have something interesting to say visually and be able to support that intellectually.

WHAT IS THE GALLERY PROCEDURE FOR ADDING AN ARTIST TO THE GALLERY ROSTER? IS THERE A SPECIFIC TIME PERIOD TO EVALUATE THE WORK OR RECOGNITION AND AWARDS FOR WORKS OF PHOTOGRAPHIC MERIT?

There is no specific time and there is no specific need or slot we are trying to fill. We do accept admissions online and are happy to take a look at digital portfolios but I would have to say that since we are an established gallery, most new additions to the roster are established artists. Those relationships are obtained by more complicated and in depth means. We are happy to be working with Ori Gersht, a recent addition to the gallery, but that didn’t happen because he sent us a link to his website.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, MATTHEW WILL SPEAK ON THE CURRENT AND FUTURE OF THE ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY.

PLEASE JOIN US.

It’s always about the image, at the Yancey Richardson Gallery with director Matthew Whitworth

Laszlo Moholy-Nagy
K VII
Oil on canvas
Shape of Light at the Tate Modern
until October 14, 2018

CURRENTLY AT THE TATE MODERN, THE EXHIBITION SHAPE OF LIFE EXPLORES THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PHOTOGRAPHY AND ABSTRACT ACT, A SUBJECT FIRST ADDRESSED IN THE UK ON SUCH A MAJOR SCALE. THE BIRTH OF ABSTRACT ART AND THE INVENTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY WERE BOTH DEFINING MOMENTS IN OUR VISUAL HISTORY.  SPANNING THE CENTURY FROM THE 1920s TO THE PRESENT, THE SHOW BRINGS TO LIFE THE INNOVATION FOUND IN PHOTOGRAPHY AND ITS SHARED HISTORY WITH ABSTRACT ART. THANKS TO THIS EXHIBITION, WHICH CONTINUES THROUGH OCTOBER 2018, WE CAN TRACE THE DIALOGUE BETWEEN SUCH PHOTOGRAPHERS AS MAN RAY, ALFRED STIEGLITZ, JARED BARK AND MAYA ROCHAT.

Jared Bark
Untitled (JBARK PB 1973)
Vintage gelatin silver photobooth prints

IN ANTICIPATION OF THE TATE MODERN SHOW, THE APRIL/MAY SOLO EXHIBITION AT YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY IN NEW YORK FEATURED JARED BARK’S AMAZING PHOTOBOOTH PIECES COMPRISED OF UNIQUE VINTAGE PHOTO BOOTH ASSEMBLAGES THAT FORM ABSTRACT IMAGES. MINIMALISM IN GENERAL AND THE WORK OF SOL LEWITT IN PARTICULAR IMPACT ON BARK’S PHOTOGRAPHY, A PERFECT EXAMPLE OF THE DIALOGUE BETWEEN ABSTRACTION IN PAINTING AND IN PHOTOGRAPHY.

YANCEY RICHARDSON OPENED IN SOHO IN 1995 AND MOVED TO CHELSEA IN 2000. CURRENTLY LOCATED IN A GREAT GROUND FLOOR EXHIBITION SPACE ON 22nd STREET, YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY IS ONE OF THE FIRST DEDICATED TO PHOTO-BASED ART.

TODAY, THE LRFA BLOG IS DELIGHTED TO CONTINUE ITS CONVERSATION WITH MATTHEW WHITWORTH, A DIRECTOR AT THE GALLERY.

http://www.yanceyrichardson.com/

Rachel Perry
Soundtrack to my Life
February – March 2018

HOW DO YOU SEE THE EVOLUTION OF THE GALLERY IN PARTICULAR AND THE PHOTOGRAPHY MARKET IN GENERAL SINCE YOU HAVE BEEN THE DIRECTOR AND SINCE YOU HAVE BEEN IN THE ART WORLD?

 With the gallery’s move 4 years ago to a ground-floor space on the same block, I can’t help but think that we’re seen as a more of an equal to the larger galleries showing painting, sculpture, and other works on paper. It levels the playing field a bit, as far as attendance for sure, to be able to be seen from the sidewalk. With that being said, along with a forward thinking program, we’ve developed quite a few new relationships with collectors who had never purchased a photograph or walked into a “photography gallery” before. That cross pollination can also be seen in the mixed-media art fairs we participate in, where we tend to do quite a bit better sales wise than at the photography specific ones. This has certainly changed since I started so many years ago when, if you wanted a specific piece by an artist, you knew there was probably only one place you could get it.

Bryan Graf
Field Recording (Sun Room)
Unique chromogenic print

HOW HAS TECHNOLOGY AFFECTED THE NATURE OF PHOTOGRAPHY?

One thing I’ve noticed is that the artists that use digital technology, don’t seem to be trying to make it as good as or just like analog anymore. Digital photography and printmaking have crossed into their own realm, where it’s OK to be digital and use the technology to its own end. Funny, though — now there’s been a return to analog with younger artists. It’s hip to use film and listen to vinyl records.

Gregory Crewdson
The Haircut, 2014
from the series Cathedral of the Pines

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE TECHNICAL ADVANCES THAT PHOTOGRAPHERS ARE EXPERIMENTING WITH THAT CHANGE THE IDEA OF WHAT A PHOTOGRAPH SHOULD BE?

Speaking to my previous point a bit more, I like to refer back to Gregory Crewdson’s last show at Gagosian. While I had mixed thoughts on the subject matter, I thought the printmaking and technical aspects of the work were so new and curious. They really were their own “thing.”

David Maisel
Terminal Mirage 22
Archival pigment printIN WHAT WAYS HAS THE ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY REMAINED THE SAME?

It’s always going to be about the image and it’s underlying strength.

DO YOU AGREE THAT PHOTOGRAPHY HAS TAKEN A TREMENDOUS LEAP FORWARD AS AN ESTABLISHED ART FORM AND AN AREA TO COLLECT?

Yes, absolutely. It used to be achieved by scale. Take the photographs of Andreas Gursky and Jeff Wall. There had never been prints that big before. Were we seduced by their imagery or their size? Today, more importantly, I see artists using photography to expand, and in some cases clarify, their voice. For example Mickalene Thomas. She may be best known for her bedazzled paintings taking on classical male artists’ views of women, but she broke out of an earlier rut in her practice by picking up a camera. She continues to make new photographic work today.

Mickalene Thomas

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, MATTHEW WILL PROFILE THE CURRENT COLLECTOR BASE AND EXPLORE PHOTOGRAPHY’S EARLIER INFLUENCES.

STAY TUNED!

 

Dedicated to photography: an introduction to the Yancey Richardson Gallery with its director Matthew Whitworth

 

Matthew Whitworth
Associate Director
Yancey Richardson Gallery

AS AN ARTISTIC MEDIUM, PHOTOGRAPHY IS A FAIRLY RECENT NEWBIE TO THE ART MARKET. ALTHOUGH THE CAMERA WAS INVENTED IN THE MID-19th CENTURY AND WAS PREDATED BY THE CAMERA OBSCURA, PHOTOGRAPHY AS AN ART FORM WAS TRULY RECOGNIZED IN THE 20th CENTURY, EXHIBITED IN GALLERIES AND COLLECTED BY INDIVIDUALS AND MUSEUMS. CIRCA 1485, LEONARDO DA VINCI USED THE CAMERA OBSCURA TO STUDY PERSPECTIVE AS FIRST DOCUMENTED IN HIS CODEX ATLANTICUS.  THE DUTCH MASTERS, PARTICULARLY VERMEER, WHOSE ICONIC PAINTINGS ARE CELEBRATED FOR THEIR QUIET BEAUTY AND IMPECCABLE DETAIL, MADE USE OF THE PINHOLE CAMERA AS EARLY AS THE MID-17th CENTURY. NOW GALLERIES DEDICATED TO THE ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY, SELLING BOTH VINTAGE AND CONTEMPORARY PRINTS, HEAVILY POPULATE THE GALLERY WORLD ALONG WITH GALLERIES THAT EQUALLY FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY IN AN EXHIBITION PLATFORM THAT INCLUDES PAINTING, SCULPTURE AND VIDEO.

Stephen Shore
County of Sutherland, Scotland
1988
C-print mounted on aluminum

ONE OF THE LONG ESTABLISHED AND MOST DEDICATED IS THE  YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY THAT OPENED IN SOHO IN 1995, THEN LAUNCHING WHAT IS TODAY ONE OF THE MOST PREEMINENT GALLERIES TO SPECIALIZE IN FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE UNITED STATES.  THE GALLERY WORKS WITH BOTH EMERGING AND ESTABLISHED COLLECTORS, MUSEUMS AND PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS. GALLERY INVENTORY RANGES FROM ESTABLISHED MASTERS OF THE 20thAND 21stCENTURY SUCH AS CARTIER-BRESSON, ROBERT FRANK, AND ANSEL ADAMS TO CONTEMPORARY AND MID-CAREER ARTISTS.

ONE OF THE MOST INTERESTING PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITIONS ON NOW IS BEING: NEW PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK. IN A BEAUTIFULLY CURATED EXHIBITION OF 17 INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, PAUL MPAGI SEPUYA EXEMPLIFIES THE PICTORIAL, POLITICAL AND SOCIAL CONCERNS OF ARTISTS’ TODAY, EXPLORING HIS IDENTITY IN INTENSE FIGURATIVE IMAGES VIEWED THROUGH THE LENS OF CONSTRUCTIVIST COLLAGE.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya
Figure with Poppies After RBN (2604), 2015
Archival pigment print

http://www.yanceyrichardson.com/

IN TODAY’S LRFA BLOG, WE ARE PLEASED TO WELCOME MATTHEW WHITWORTH, A DIRECTOR AT THE GALLERY SINCE 2015.

MATT, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR CONTRIBUTING TO THE LRFA BLOG WITH OUR FIRST INTERVIEW ON A GALLERY DEDICATED EXCLUSIVELY TO THE ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY.

HOW DID YOU FIRST BECOME INTERESTED IN ART? DID YOUR FAMILY COLLECT OR WHERE YOU INTERESTED IN THE PRACTICE ITSELF?

When I was a young boy growing up in New York City, my favorite places to visit (besides the Museum of Natural History) were the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim, the latter most likely because I had dreams of skateboarding down it. I liked looking at the paintings and sculptures and roaming around the great spaces. I also went to school with Frank Stella’s son Michael. He would invite me over and we’d hang out. His dad had some of his own large-scale paintings installed in their house as well as several in progress downstairs in the studio. I thought they were pretty cool, but not as much as the scale model train sets he had been working on.

Frank Stella
Whitney Museum of American Art
2015 Retrospective

My introduction to photography came from my mother. She became interested in amateur photography through her sister and set up a small darkroom when I was about 7. I was hooked instantly. Seeing images develop in the shadows of the red darkroom safelight was like alchemy to me.

WHAT IS YOUR EDUCATIONAL HISTORY AND WHEN DID YOU BEGIN TO FOCUS ON ART HISTORY IN GENERAL AND PHOTOGRAPHY IN PARTICULAR?

 My interest in photography continued throughout high school when my family and I moved to a small suburb of Boston. I was able to use the school’s equipment as well as set up a darkroom in our basement. I went to UMass Amherst for 2 years and took some wonderful art history classes, but was frustrated there because I had to travel back and forth to Smith College (as part of the great Five College Interchange program) to gain access to a darkroom and photography classes. I remembered SUNY Purchase had an active art program from my earlier college searches, so I went to visit and before I knew it, had transferred and graduated. My all-time favorite class at Purchase was “Field Trips to Museums and Galleries of New York,” taught by Irving Sandler. It was equivalent to something like “Tasting Great French Food of New York with Julia Child.”

David Maisel
Atlas
Aerial Photography

WHAT A PRIVILEGE TO HAVE STUDIED WITH IRVING SANDLER, ONE OF AMERICA’S MOST INFLUENTIAL ART HISTORIANS WHO, IN 1970, WROTE THE LANDMARK “TRIUMPH OF AMERICA PAINTING” AND, AS RECENTLY AS 2015, “SWEPT UP BY ART”.

https://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-features/magazines/archives-new-cool-art/?utm_source=Art+in+America&utm_campaign=aff2ae75aa-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_06_05_03_40&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c7cb106f7b-aff2ae75aa-293049497

WHAT IS YOUR PREVIOUS WORK HISTORY AND WHAT PROMPTED THE MOVE TO YOUR CURRENT POSITION?

I worked at Janet Borden, Inc. for many, many years. I learned a lot but it was time for a change. YRG’s program is so relevant, topical, and growing in such an interesting way. I’m proud to be a part of it.

David Maisel
Atlas
Aerial photography
May 17 – July 6, 2018

IN OUR NEXT POST, MATTHEW WILL SHARE SOME OF THE VERY RICH HISTORY OF THE GALLERY, FROM ITS ORIGINAL LOCATION IN SoHo, TO ITS CURRENT ONE ON WEST 22nd STREET IN THE HEART OF CHELSEA.

PLEASE JOIN US!