Leslie Rankow Fine Arts

INTERNATIONAL ART ADVISORY SERVICE

Dana Prussian, VP Art Services, Bank of America Private Bank: a focused career path

Dana Prussian
VP, Art Services, Bank of America Private Bank

 

ON MAY 30, 2018, WEALTH MANAGEMENT.COM FEATURED AN ARTICLE ON THE NOW ESTABLISHED INCLUSION OF ART AS AN ASSET CLASS.

AT CHRISTIE’S, THE COLLECTION OF PEGGY AND DAVID ROCKEFELLER SET A RECORD HIGH FOR THE MOST VALUABLE PRIVATE COLLECTION   SOLD AT AUCTION AT $833 MILLION.

n.b. Gathered over a lifetime and handed down from previous generations, the collection reflects the Rockefeller family’s deep, life long passion for Impressionist works of Art, American paintings, English and European furniture, Asian works of art, European ceramics and Chinese porcelain,  silver, and American decorative arts and furniture. What was a passion for collecting for pure aesthetic joy has been transformed into a philanthropic legacy. The proceeds from the Estate sale at Christie’s have gone to support selected charities in which the Rockefellers believed. 

Peggy and David Rockefeller sale
Christie’s New York

“THE VIGOROUS BUYING THIS WEEK FOR EVERYTHING FROM A MONET TO A MONEY CLIP … SURPRISED MANY ART EXPERTS,” ACCORDING TO A NEW YORK TIMES REPORT ON THE AUCTION.

INDEED, A CONVERGENCE OF FACTORS IN RECENT YEARS HAS GENERATED HIGHER INTEREST IN ART AS AN ASSET THAT HAS THE POTENTIAL TO APPRECIATE: INTEREST RATES AT HISTORIC LOWS, STOCK MARKET VOLATILITY, TECHNOLOGY CREATING INCREASED TRANSPARENCY IN THE ART MARKET AND INCREASED INTEREST IN ART GLOBALLY, AMONG OTHERS.

ALTHOUGH DEMAND FOR ART FLUCTUATES, WITH DIFFERENT AREAS OF THE ART MARKET EXPERIENCING VARYING LEVELS OF DEMAND, THE GROWING TREND OF VIEWING ART AS AN ASSET CLASS HAS MEANT INCREASED INTEREST AMONG WEALTH MANAGEMENT PROFESSIONALS. NEARLY 90 PERCENT OF WEALTH MANAGERS SAID THEY THINK ART AND COLLECTIBLES SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN WEALTH MANAGEMENT OFFERINGS, ACCORDING TO THE DELOITTE 2017 ART & FINANCE REPORT.

https://www.wealthmanagement.com/high-net-worth/art-asset-class

Christie’s Education

IN TODAY’S LRFA BLOG POST, WE ARE FASCINATED TO FOLLOW DANA’S ASTUTE ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL JOURNEY REFLECTING BOTH HER PASSION AND HER COMMITMENT TO MASTERING THE ART OF FINANCE.  IN TODAY’S WORLD, MANY PRIVATE AND PUBLIC BANKS AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS HAVE DIVISIONS SPECIALIZING IN OFFERING LOANS AND ADVISE ON COLLECTING, THE BANK OF AMERICA BEING ONE OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING. MANY UNIVERSITIES AND AUCTION HOUSES OFFER CLASSES AND DEGREES. CHRISTIE’S, FOR EXAMPLE,  OFFERS A GRADUATE DEGREE: MASTERS IN ART, LAW AND BUSINESS.

https://www.christies.edu/new-york/courses/degree/masters/art-law-business

A FEW YEARS AGO WHEN DANA WAS STILL IN SCHOOL, SHE WAS A PIONEER AND CARVED OUT HER OWN ACADEMIC PATH TO GAIN RECOGNITION AS A FINANCIAL ADVISOR TO INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES OF HIGH NET WORTH.

DANA, THE LRFA BLOG WARMLY WELCOMES YOU BACK.

WERE YOU COMMITTED TO THE IDEA OF COMBINING ART AND FINANCE FROM THE BEGINNING OR DID THE IDEA EVOLVE AS YOU PROGRESSED IN SCHOOL AND PROFESSIONALLY?

Yes, pretty much. That said, when I graduated, the idea of “Art as an Asset Class” was only just taking shape. It certainly was not institutionalized like it is now. I knew that I wanted to jump onto that track as soon as possible, but was not sure how long it would take.

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST POSITION AND DID IT COMBINE YOUR TWO AREAS OF EXPERTISE?

It had nothing to do with the art world! I had just come out of a Christie’s internship when I graduated, and I knew that if I wanted to work in the Art Finance sphere, I needed the Finance component. I knew nothing about finance! Like one Columbia Econ class, nothing. So I got into a two-year rotational analyst program at Barclays, which gave me a necessary understanding of financial products.  

A SELF-MADE MAN, HENRY PHIPPS UNDERSTOOD THE CHALLENGES INVOLVED IN CREATING WEALTH. AS A FOUNDING PARTNER AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER OF CARNEGIE STEEL, HIS INNOVATIONS MATCHED HIS WORK ETHIC. HE ALSO UNDERSTOOD THE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN COMMUNICATING AND SUSTAINING VALUES, AND GROWING AND PRESERVING WEALTH FOR HIS FAMILY. PHIPPS FOUNDED BESSEMER TRUST WITH THIS CONNECTION IN MIND. HE COMMUNICATED HIS INTENTIONS AND GUIDANCE TO EACH OF HIS CHILDREN, URGING THEM TO SPEND WISELY AND WORK COLLABORATIVELY TO PRESERVE AND MAINTAIN THE FAMILY’S WEALTH AND VALUES FOR GENERATIONS TO COME.

https://www.bessemertrust.com/what-makes-us-different/key-facts

YOU WERE AT BESSEMER TRUST FOR OVER THREE YEARS. HOW DID THEY GROOM YOU FOR YOUR CURRENT POSITION?

Bessemer was the perfect intermediary step to my transitioning into Art Services. The advisors and culture are truly crème de la crème, and I was fortunate enough to be part of an incredibly motivated team. Working as a Client Advisor there taught me three invaluable skills: how to hustle and grow a book of business, what it looks like to provide exceptional client service, and how to look at a balance sheet holistically. I worked with several art collectors who were part of our book, and by the end of my time at Bessemer, I knew that I had the skill set to serve a super sophisticated group of collectors and focus solely on the art on their balance sheets. I ultimately left Bessemer because, in the time I was there, the concept of “Art as an Asset Class” took shape more formally and there was a new spot open at Bank of America Private Bank.   

WHAT ARE YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE ART SERVICES DIVISION AT BANK OF AMERICA PRIVATE BANK?

I’m one of two VPs of Art Services on the team. The two of us have divided the country in half and lead Art Lending and Consignment efforts for our markets. I focus on our NYC market in addition to Miami, Palm Beach, Dallas, Houston, DC, and Long Island. You can imagine, that’s a lot of art collectors and internal advisors to cover!

HOW DID THE PROGRAM DEVELOP? WHEN WAS IT INITIATED AND HOW HAS IT GROWN AND CHANGED SINCE ITS ONSET?

In 2015, the Private Bank (formerly US Trust) hired Deloitte to implement a strategy that would serve our clients and their art collections. The head of that consulting project came on board as our National Arts Services Executive, and he built out the program from there. In the last four years, our team has grown our Art Lending book from $2 billion to $8 billion. We’re now the largest art lenders in the country.

 

Bank of America
Art Services
Panel Discussion

WHAT IS THE SCOPE OF SERVICES THAT YOU OFFER COLLECTORS AND INSTITUTIONS?

We are obviously highly focused on art lending, but we have expanded our services beyond lines of credit. We offer the only Consignment Services platform at a private bank, so we can act as agent for a client who wishes to sell at auction. We negotiate everything from enhanced financial packages to sales and marketing strategies.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, DANA PRUSSIAN WILL SHARE WITH US THE WORKING OF THE ART SERVICES DIVISION AT BANK OF AMERICA PRIVATE BANKING. THANK YOU, DANA, AND THANK ALL THE FOLLOWERS OF THE BLOG FOR YOUR CONTINUED INTEREST!

Introducing Dana Prussian, Bank of America Private Bank Art Services, combining business acumen and a passion for art

Dana Prussian
VP, Art Services, Bank of America Private Bank

IN MARCH 2016, THE NEW YORK TIMES PUBLISHED A STUDY ON A TREND IN THE ART MARKET WHICH HAS BEEN ON THE RISE  FOR AT LEAST THE LAST DECADE: ART AS AN ALTERNATIVE ASSET AND AS COLLATERAL FOR A LOAN.

Highlights from

ART AS COLLATERAL IN A FICKLE MARKET, Scott Rayburn, March 7, 2016, New York Times

Art and money have long been closely linked, but in the 21st century, it seems, the two have become synonymous.

One way to extract the latter from the former is art-based lending, in which paintings or sculptures are used as collateral for loans. Now that the notoriously fickle and opaque art market is seemingly headed toward a downturn, with money tighter and the prices of many artworks lower, will this kind of niche financing become more attractive to collectors?

Art lenders who have offered full-recourse loans, secured by a range of personal assets, have faced unfavorable publicity. During the financial crisis of 2008-2009, the photographer Annie Leibovitz pledged her four homes and the rights to her images to secure a $24 million loan from Art Capital. She was unable to service the debt, and a high-profile court action ensued.

“This is an opportunity,” Andrea Danese, a co-founder of Athena and the company’s chief executive, said in a telephone interview. Mr. Danese said there was potentially about $150 billion worth of art in private hands that could be collateralized. He identified three groups to whom his company’s products might appeal.

“First, there are billionaires who put the money into private equity deals, where they make 20 to 25 percent,” he said. “Then there are collectors with, say, $30 million of art they leverage to buy another piece. And thirdly there are the art-rich and cash-poor in their 70s and 80s who don’t want to sell because of capital gains or estate taxes.”

But art lenders, like pawnbrokers, can get a boost when markets dip.

THIS UNPRECEDENTED DEVELOPMENT IN THE ART MARKET OVER THE LAST DECADE HAS RESULTED IN A FOCUS ON THE FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF ART. ART IS SEEN NOT ONLY AS AN OBJECT THAT IS AESTHETIC PLEASING OR CHALLENGING AND INTELLECTUALLY FULFILLING BUT ALSO AS A NEW ALTERNATIVE ASSET CLASS OFFERING INTERESTING BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES. THUS, IT HAS PRODUCED AN OPPORTUNITY FOR EXPERTS IN THE FINANCIAL WORLD WHO ARE INTERESTED IN ART TO ENJOY EXCITING AND INNOVATIVE CAREERS THAT COMBINE THE TWO.

DANA PRUSSIAN, VICE PRESIDENT, ART SERVICES AT BANK OF AMERICA PRIVATE BANK, IS AN IMPRESSIVE, ARTICULATE AND KNOWLEDGEABLE WOMAN WHO IS  APPLYING HER INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL BACKGROUND AND TRAINING TO ASSIST INDIVIDUAL COLLECTORS  AND ART INSTITUTIONS IN THE ACQUISITION, DONATION AND DEACCESSION ART AND TO USE ART AS AN ALTERNATIVE INVESTMENT VEHICLE.

Linnea in Monet’s Garden

THE LRFA BLOG IS HONORED TO WELCOME DANA PRUSSIAN.

DANA, SO MANY THANKS FOR TAKING THE TIME TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE LRFA BLOG. WHERE DID YOU GROW UP? DID YOU HAVE AN INTEREST IN ART AT AN EARLY AGE AND, IF SO, HOW DID THAT COME ABOUT?

I grew up in Louisville. My parents encouraged me to be active in the arts- I danced with the Louisville Ballet, took acting classes, played the violin. I’m not sure where my interest in fine art came about, though I do remember being obsessed with Linnea in Monet’s Garden when I was very young. Did anyone else have that doll? Book? Video? Childhood affinity for Giverny?

Diego Rivera Industry Murals
Detroit Institute of the Arts

WAS YOUR FAMILY INTERESTED IN OR COLLECT ART?

Not particularly, but my family has always supported the arts, whether it was the symphony, the theater, or the ballet. Much of my extended family lives in Bloomfield Hills, MI, and my aunt was a docent at the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) while I was growing up. I vividly remember visiting Rivera’s Detroit Industry Murals and the beautifully intricate Dutch Golden Age paintings.

Gerard der Borch, The Younger
Lady at Her Toilette
Collection of the Detroit Institute of the Arts

WHAT IS YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND?

I moved to New York City 10 years ago to attend Barnard College at Columbia University where I received a degree in both Art History and Political Science. It was really my secondary school that influenced me more than anything. I went to Louisville Collegiate School, which is this very close-knit, traditional college prep school, and I still feel endlessly lucky to have attended. We had a required course, HATA (or, History and the Arts) that was a two-year world history class with corresponding art, dance, music, and religion. It was my first serious exposure to art history and the material was woven in this organic, experiential way. After that course, I moved right into AP Art History, and it was a love story from there. I ended up passing out of the first three levels of art history when I arrived at Columbia. Even though I was so influenced by Collegiate, that there is nothing, NOTHING like being an Art History student in New York City. My senior seminar was at the Met on Monday mornings (the good old days when the Met was closed on Mondays and we essentially had the museum to ourselves), and I vividly remember meeting classmates on the Met steps on crisp autumn mornings, taking class with one of the Met’s curators, and then heading down 5th avenue to Christie’s for my fall internship. You simply cannot replicate that experience anywhere else.

Johannes Vermeer
Young Woman with a Pitcher
Metropolitan Museum of Art

WHAT DID YOU INTEND YOUR CAREER PATH TO BE WHEN YOU FIRST STARTED WORKING?

My exact role, except it did not exist when I graduated!

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, DANA WILL START TO DETAIL HER PROFESSIONAL ROLES THAT LEAD HER TO HER CURRENT POSITION. GREAT INSIGHTS FOR EVERYONE INTERESTED IN COLLECTING OR IN FOLLOWING IN HER FOOTSTEPS!

PLEASE JOIN US!

 

Stronger for Life, a grant finalist!

Dear Followers, Friends and Colleagues who generously donated to the documentary Stronger for Life:

Happy New Year! I thought you would be as pleased as I am to start the New Year with this wonderful piece of news. From the Heart Productions was created over 20 years ago to support independent documentary film making. It is truly an honor for the doc to have made this year’s finalist list. They appoint a new team of judges to determine the winner but, in the meantime, the info on the documentary will be publicized by them to encourage other producers and companies to support financing our post-production costs. As you know, there has been genuine interest on the part of several major figures in the film industry who have expressed interest in seeing the final cut of the film and helping with its marketing and distribution.

Of course, we will keep you posted but in the meantime, thank you all so much– we could never have come this far without your incredible support.

So many thanks,

Leslie

Leslie Rankow/Executive Producer/STRONGER FOR LIFE

Stronger for Life is an honored finalist for the From the Heart Productions/Roy W. Dean Grant featured in their newsletter and on their website to encourage donations from other producers and companies.

 

VIDEO

From Ilaria Montagnani, founder of Powerstrike, on her documentary, STRONGER FOR LIFE

I am excited to announce that the Stronger For Life documentary has been selected as one of 20 finalists in a highly competitive grant process established by From The Heart Productions: Roy M. Dean Grant. In the coming months, ten new judges will be selected to review the finalists’ films and choose the Top 10.
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Because we made it into the 20 finalists, they are offering a feature in the next newsletter, and a year’s exposure on their website, to encourage other producers and companies to donate and fund for additional post production.
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We are currently working on a newer cut and I am looking forward to giving you more updates soon.
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Thank you all. None of this would have been possible without your support.
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Much gratitude,
Ilaria

Special gifts for any season from Gagosian’s rare book expert, Doug Flamm

Marcel Duchamp
Eau & Gaz A Tous Les Etages

IN 2005, THE CENTRE POMPIDOU CURATED  A SURVEY, “THE OBJECT IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY”, TRACING THE HISTORY OF OBJECTS IN OUR WESTERN PICTORIAL TRADITION.

THE OBJECT HAS APPEARED THROUGHOUT HISTORY SINCE ANTIQUITY. IN THE 16th CENTURY, HOWEVER, THE REPRESENTATION OF INANIMATE OBJECTS BECAME QUITE SEPARATE AS A GENRE IN ITSELF: THE STILL LIFE. SKULLS, MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, MIRRORS, BASKETS OF FLOWERS AND FRUITS SEEM TO ENCLOSE THE VIEWER IN THE MUTE WORLD OF THINGS.

DUTCH PAINTING IN THE 16TH AND 17TH CENTURIES WAS FULL OF TABLES ARRAYED WITH CRYSTALLINE GLASSES AND PEELED FRUIT, WHILE THE VANITAS BECAME ESTABLISHED IN FRANCE, WHERE A CENTURY LATER THE UNDISPUTED GENIUS OF THE GENRE. CHARDIN, WOULD RISE TO PROMINENCE. THE STILL LIFE WAS ALSO CEZANNE’S PREFERRED REALM OF PICTORIAL PRODUCTION, SINCE IT OFFERS AN INEXHAUSTIBLE REPERTOIRE OF FORMS, COLORS AND DIFFERENT KINDS OF LIGHT. THE CUBISTS WOULD SEE IT AS THE GENRE BEST SUITED TO CONVEY THE QUESTION OF THE REPRESENTATION OF SPACE IN PAINTING. WITH HIS REVOLUTIONARY STILL LIFE WITH CHAIR CANING, AS EARLY AS 1912, PICASSO BROUGHT INTO THE PICTURE A PIECE OF OILCLOTH FOR THE CANING AND AN ACTUAL ROPE TO GIVE MATERIAL PRESENCE TO THE OVAL OF THE CHAIR’S FRAME.

http://mediation.centrepompidou.fr/education/ressources/ENS-Object-EN/ENS-objet-EN.htm

Marcel Duchamp
Eau et Gaz a Tous les Etages

BUT THE RADICAL GESTURE BELONGED TO MARCEL DUCHAMP WHO  TRANSFORMED THE MANUFACTURED EVERYDAY OBJECT, THE READYMADE, INTO A WORK OF ART BY MEANS OF NOTHING MORE THAN HIS DECLARATION THAT IT WAS SO.  PIERO MANZONI’S CONTRIBUTION TO THIS AVANT-GARDE APPROACH INTRODUCED RADICALLY UNCONVENTIONAL MATERIALS  AND IN THE UNITED STATES IN THE SIXTIES, ELLSWORTH KELLY CHALLENGED THE TRADITIONAL DEFINITION AND FORMAT OF PAINTING BY CREATING SHAPED OBJECTS OF PURE FORM AND COLOR.

THANKS TO DOUG FLAMM’S INFORMED EYE, GAGOSIAN GALLERY’S RARE BOOK EXPERT HAS SELECTED THREE VERY SPECIAL BOOKS THAT COVER DIFFERENT PERIODS AND ISMS OF ART BUT SPEAK IN TERMS OF THE UNIQUE VISION OF EACH ARTIST’S AESTHETIC RELATIONSHIP TO THE OBJECT.

MARCEL DUCHAMP

In the concept of the readymade that expanded our parameters of the definition of art, Marcel Duchamp became associated with an assault on the conventional understanding of art’s nature and status. Duchamp also used readymades as parts of a private symbolic language. He spoke of how using prefabricated objects freed him from the ‘trap’ of developing a particular style or taste. Duchamp did very little painting after 1912, creating the first of his “readymades” ‘in 1913. These were ordinary objects of everyday use, sometimes slightly altered, and designated works of art by the artist. His earliest readymades included Bicycle Wheel (1913), a wheel mounted on a wooden stool, and a snow shovel entitled In Advance of the Broken Arm (1915). One of his best-known pieces is a urinal, titled Fountain and signed ‘R. Mutt’

Marcel Duchamp

Eau et Gaz à Tous les Étages

Accompanied by a self- portrait of Duchamp signed “Marcel Dechiravit,” with
a hand-colored collotype
of The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (the Large Glass), an original pochoir frontispiece, and a pochoir
of the readymade Eau et Gaz à Tous les Étages signed by Duchamp.

Piero Manzoni
Stadtisches Museum Munich

PIERO MANZONI

Piero Manzoni di Chiosca e Poggiolo, better known as Piero Manzoni, was an Italian artist best known for his ironic approach to avant-garde art. Often compared to the work of Yves Klein, his own work anticipated, and directly influenced, the work of a generation of younger Italian artists brought together by the critic Germano Celant in the first Arte Povera exhibition held in Genoa, 1967. Manzoni is most famous for a series of artworks that call into question the nature of the art object, directly prefiguring Conceptual Art. His work eschews normal artist’s materials, instead using everything from rabbit fur to human excrement in order to “tap mythological sources and to realize authentic and universal values”. Piero Manzoni

PIero Manzoni
MANZONI, 1970
Edition Stadlisches Museum

Piero Manzoni

Mönchengladbach Kassettenpublikation

Texts by Johannes Cladders and Udo Kultermann

Mönchengladbach, Germany: Städtisches Museum Mönchengladbach, 1969.

This limited-edition catalogue for Piero Manzoni’s posthumous 1969–70 exhibition at the Städtisches Museum Mönchen- gladbach comes encased in a clear plastic box with eight indents. The catalogue includes twenty-two black-and-white offset images. With essays by Johannes Cladders and Udo Kultermann (in German). From an edition of 440 copies.

Paris: Trianon Press, 1959.

This is the deluxe edition of the first catalogue raisonné of the work of Marcel Duchamp, containing 208 detailed entries and an extensive bibliography. The box, designed by Duchamp, includes a signed readymade mounted on the front cover, reading: “Eau et Gaz à Tous les Étages.”

Mounted to the red cloth-covered box is autoportrait de profil of Duchamp, signed “Marcel Dechiravit.” The box has two hinged panels of an acetate reproduction and a collotype reproduction, with the former depicting a scale-version of Duchamp’s famous The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (the Large Glass). From an edition of 137 copies

ELLSWORTH KELLY
Ellsworth Kelly’s work can be viewed in terms of what it is not. unlike the painting of the abstraction expressionist and color field artists at the time, Kelly had no desire to make works involving expression, conceptual organization, depiction, or narrative. He was willing to drop traditional painting’s insistence on the square or rectangular frame to pursue departures of vision and experience.

Ellsworth Kelly

Derriere Le Miroir, No. 149

Containing five original lithographs

Paris: Maeght Editeur, 1964.

Ellsworth Kelly produced five original lithographs for this issue of Derrière le Miroir, the French art magazine created in 1946
and published until 1982. This deluxe issue was printed on Arches paper and is housed in the original chemise and slipcase. Unlike the prints from the regular edition, the print quality of the deluxe edition is superlative in its color and feel. From an edition of 150 copies, signed by the artist.

DOUG, WARM REGARDS AND  ENORMOUS THANKS FROM THE LRFA BLOG FOR THIS YEAR’S CONTRIBUTION.

HAPPY NEW YEAR AND NEW DECADE TO ONE AND ALL!

Christopher Schardt
Lyra
Installation at Hudson Yards, New York

 

From Durer to Anish Kapoor, centuries of great books thanks to Gagosian rare book specialist, Doug Flamm

Albert Durer
Die Unterweysung der Messung

CURRENTLY AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM, THE EXHIBITION “THE RENAISSANCE OF ETCHING” IS A BEAUTIFULLY CURATED AND IN-DEPTH STUDY OF A PRIINTMAKING TECHNIQUE THAT CHANGED THE COURSE OF THE MEDIUM.  ITS TRANSFORMATIVE POWER DEMOCRATIZED ART AND PROVIDED ACCESSIBLE IMAGES TO THE MASSES AS EARLY AS THE 15th CENTURY. WHEN THE TECHNIQUE MOVED FROM A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE  INTO THE DOMAIN OF PRINTMAKERS AND PAINTERS, IT REVOLUTIONIZED THE ART WORLD AND CONTINUES TO REPRESENT A PIVOTAL MOMENT IN THE HISTORY OF ART.

The history of printmaking has been punctuated by moments of great invention that have completely changed the course of the medium. The beginning of etching in Europe in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries—when the technique moved out of the workshop of armor decorators and into those of printmakers and painters—represents one of those pivotal moments. Etching, essentially drawing on the surface of a metal plate, had an ease that opened the door for all kinds of artists to make prints. The pioneers of the medium included some of the greatest painters of the Renaissance, such as Albrecht Dürer, Parmigianino, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder.

This exhibition traces the first sixty years of the etched print (circa 1490 to circa 1560), from its emergence in the workshop of the German printmaker and armor decorator Daniel Hopfer to the years when a range of artists from Germany, Flanders, Italy, and France began experimenting with etching. Approximately 125 etchings, produced by both renowned and lesser-known artists, are displayed alongside a number of drawings, printing plates, illustrated books, and armor.

https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/renaissance-of-etching

Albert Durer

AVAILABLE AT GAGOSIAN BOOKSHOP,  AT 976 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK, BETWEEN 76th AND 77th STREET, AN EXTRAORDINARY STUDY BY ALBERT DURER DELVES EVEN MORE DEEPLY INTO THE SUBJECT OF 15th CENTURY ART BY ONE OF THE GREAT ARTISTS AND PRINTMAKERS OF THE GERMAN RENAISSANCE. BORN IN THE IMPERIAL FREE CITY OF NUREMBERG, GERMANY, DURER’S VAST BODY OF WORK INCLUDED ALTARPIECES AND RELIGIOUS WORKS, NUMEROUS PORTRAITS AND SELF-PORTRAITS, AND ENGRAVINGS.

TREAT YOURSELF OR ANY ART HISTORICALLY ORIENTED  FRIEND OR COLLEAGUE WITH A COPY OF THIS VERY RARE BOOK, INTRODUCED TO US BY GAGOSIAN’S RARE BOOK SPECIALIST, DOUG FLAMM, WHO HAS BROUGHT THE GAGOSIAN BOOKSHOPS HERE AND IN PARIS AND LONDON TO A LEVEL OF GREAT ATTENDANCE AND POPULARITY, WITH BOOKS RANGING AS FAR BACK AT THIS 15th CENTURY BOOK BY ALBERT DURER UP TO THE MOST AVANT-GARDE PRINTINGS AND EXPERIMENTAL ARTISTS’ BOOKS OF THIS DECADE.

Albert Durer
Die Unterweysung der Messung

ALBERT DURER

Die Unterweysung der Messung, mit dem Zirckel unn Richtscheyt

in Linien ebnen ganken corporen

Nuremberg, Germany: Hieronymous Andreas Formschneider, 1525.

This is the first edition of Dürer’s treatise on perspective and the uses of mathematical geometry in art. Historically significant, it is the first literary document in which a strictly representational problem—painting—receives a scientific analysis at the hands of a Northern European artist.

In the book, Dürer examines the construction of plane curves and helices by means of Euclidian geometry; the construction of polygons and their uses in architectural ornamentation and parquet floors; as well as polyhedrons, stereometry, and perspective. The woodcuts and diagrams are beautifully executed with great precision; these include the famous illustrations of the two figures demonstrating a drawing instrument, signed with Dürer’s monogram (dated 1525 for this edition), as well as an image of an artist drawing a seated man with the aid of Dürer’s machine. The text of Book Three contains Dürer’s famous original treatise on the shaping of Roman capital letters and the construction of Gothic letters using small geometrical forms.

There were three further German editions of Die Unterweysung, published in 1533, 1538, and 1603, as well as five Latin editions published between 1532 and 1606.

CENTURIES LATER, PUBLISHED BY CAROLINA NITSCH AND THE NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART IN 2005,  DOUG FLAMM HAS INTRODUCED THE LRFA BLOG TO AN EXTRAORDINARY WORLD ATLAS BY THE CONTEMPORARY BRITISH INDIAN SCULPTOR, ANISH KAPOOR.

Anish Kapoor
Turning the World

Anish Kapoor is a leading contemporary British-Indian artist working in large-scale abstract public sculpture. Among his best-known works is the popular Cloud Gate (2006), otherwise known as “the Bean,” featured in Chicago’s Millennium Park. Throughout his career, Kapoor has worked on a variety of scales and with diverse materials—mirrors, stone, wax, and PVC—exploring both biomorphic and geometric forms with a particular interest in negative space. “That’s what I am interested in: the void, the moment when it isn’t a hole,” he explained. “It is a space full of what isn’t there.” Born on March 12, 1954 in Bombay, India, Kapoor moved to London in the late 1970s, studying at both the Hornsey College of Art and Chelsea College of Arts. He first gained critical recognition for his work in the 1980s, with his metaphysical site-specific works in which he manipulates form and the perception of space.

Anish Kapoor
Turning the World

ANISH KAPOOR

TURNING THE WORLD
New York: Carolina Nitsch and
New Museum of Contemporary Art, 2005.

A world atlas open to a spread. A circle and a square shape are cut out of the left and right pages, respectively. Incrementally smaller shapes are cut out of each page behind the spread, creating two painted volumes into the depths of the entire atlas. The front, spine, and back cover of the atlas are also painted. From an edition of 26 copies, signed and numbered by the artist.

Taking a cue from current events, British artist Anish Kapoor furthered his formal exploration of the void in this work. Using the field provided by a world atlas opened to pages displaying the Middle East, Kapoor incised and painted geometric shapes on both recto and verso. Negative space, for instance, is created by a red circle carved out on the left and a red square carved out on the right. These extend through the entire depth of the book and leave nations demarcated and divided by cartographic abstractions. Each signed and numbered edition is displayed in a slipcase, with painted front and back cover and spine.

ALTHOUGH  CHRISTMAS IS OFFICIALLY TOMORROW, EVERYONE WILL WELCOME A BELATED GIFT FROM GAGOSIAN BOOKSHOP.

PLEASE JOIN THE LRFA BLOG IN OUR NEXT POST AS DOUG FLAMM, AT GAGOSIAN, CONTINUES TO TEMPT US WITH HIS RECOMMENDATIONS.

AND IN THE MEANTIME, THE HAPPIEST OF HOLIDAYS!

Roy Lichtenstein
Peace Through Christmas Tree

Tis the season to visit Doug Flamm, rare book specialist at Gagosian Gallery

Gagosian Gallery and Bookshop, New York, Madison Avenue

WHATEVER YOUR AESTHETIC  INTERESTS OR THOSE OF THE LUCKY PEOPLE YOU ARE GIFTING, DOUG FLAMM, WHO MODESTLY HOLDS COURT AT THE GAGOSIAN SHOP, AT 976 MADISON AVENUE, BETWEEN 76th AND 77th STREET, HAS BOTH AN EXPERT’S KNOWLEDGE OF RARE BOOKS AND ART BOOKS AND AN INTUITIVE SENSE OF EXACTLY WHICH VOLUME WILL FASCINATE AND DELIGHT THE RECIPIENT FOR MANY YEARS TO COME.

THE LRFA BLOG ALWAYS LOOKS FORWARD TO THE HOLIDAY SEASON FOR THE EXCUSE TO VISIT GAGOSIAN BOOKSHOP AND TO VISIT WITH DOUG, PICKING DIFFERENT GIFTS AND, ON OCCASION, PURCHASING AN IRRESISTIBLE ONE TO TAKE HOME.

WE ARE  DELIGHTED TO CELEBRATE OUR HOLIDAY TRADITION AND SHARE DOUG FLAMM’S LATEST PICKS FOR YOU AND YOURS. THE FIRST TWO RECOMMENDATIONS REVISIT THE SIXTIES AND SEVENTIES, AN HOMAGE TO THE NEW YORK ART WORLD BY UGO MULAS IN THE SIXTIES AND TO THE NEW YORK AVANT-GARDE  IN THE SEVENTIES BY GIANFRANCO GORGONI.

Ugo Mulas New York: The New Art Scene

This exhibition of photographs by the Italian Ugo Mulas (1928-1973) was redolent with a double nostalgia. The first was the subject – the New York art world in the 1960s and the artists who made it the culture capital of the known universe. During three visits to New York, Mulas and his camera got inside the studios, dinner parties, and happenings of the likes of Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Barnett Newman, and Andy Warhol, among others. He charted the movement from one generation to the next, from the Abstract Expressionist legacy of “go big or go home,” in a portrait of Newman in front of a vast empty white canvas, to the casual disorder of manufacture in Warhol’s “factory,” with Jackie Os scattered on the floor. The appearance of such figures as choreographer Trisha Brown notwithstanding, Mulas’s New York is a boys’ club, no matter which way they might swing sexually. But looking at these photographs, you almost wanted to have been there.

http://photographmag.com/reviews/ugo-mulas-new-york-the-new-art-scene-at-matthew-marks-gallery/

New York: The New Art Scene is Ugo Mulas’s homage to Manhattan’s art world of the mid-1960s. The book includes photographs of the Pop Art scene as well as of studio visits with Lee Bontecou, John Chamberlain, Jim Dine, Marcel Duchamp, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Barnett Newman, Kenneth Noland, Claes Oldenburg, Larry Poons, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, George Segal, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Tom Wesselmann.

UGL MULAS New York: The New York Art Scene

UGO MULAS

New York:
The New Art Scene

Text by Alan Solomon

Illustrated with approx. 500 photogravure plates by Ugo Mulas

New York: Holt Rinehart Winston, 1967.

RICHARD SERRA The New Avat-Garde, Issues for the Art of the Seventies

RICHARD SERRA

SUSTAINING AN IMPORTANT CAREER FOR NEARLY 5 DECADES, RICHARD SERRA RECENTLY COMMANDED THREE UBER GAGOSIAN GALLERY SPACES IN NEW YORK.HIS WORK WAS FIRST ATTRACTING ATTENTION IN THE SEVENTIES AND SHAPED THE DISCOURSE OF ART IN THE 20th CENTURY.

One of the most famous sculptors of his generation, Richard Serra is also one of the most important artists of the 20th century. Combining the action of Abstract Expressionism with the raw, procedural grind of Process Art, his sculptures recast Minimalism on a monumental scale. Recognizable for their patina—Serra’s favorite material is rolled Cor-Ten steel with an evenly rusted surface—as much as for their size, sculptures like Torqued Ellipses (1996-1997) at the  Dia: Beacon count among the previous century’s most iconic artworks.

https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-how-richard-serra-changed-the-course-of-public-art

THE MINIMALIST SCULPTOR, RICHARD SERRA, WITH CURRENT SHOWS IN THE FALL OF 2019 AT THREE BRANCHES OF THE GAGOSIAN GALLERY, KEEPS THE DYNAMIC OF THE SUBLIME IN SPLENDID TENSION.

The New Yorker, The Art World, October 7, 2019 ISSUE

RICHARD SERRA WILL JOLT YOU AWAKE

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/07/richard-serra-will-jolt-you-awake

GIANFRANCO GORGONI (1941-2019)
The Italian photographer Gianfranco Gorgoni, who was the premiere documenter of major Land art works—including Robert Smithson’s  SpiralJetty, 1970, and Christo and Jeanne-Claude,  Running Fence, 1976—has died at age seventy-seven. Born in Rome, Gorgoni moved to the US in 1968 to produce a photographic essay and stayed after a chance encounter with Robert Rauschenberg.In the 1970s, Gorgoni captured the portraits of artists including Ellsworth Kelly, Claes Oldenburg, Agnes Martin, Andy Warhol, Alfred Leslie,  and others, many of which were included in his book The New Avant-Garde: Issues for the Art of the Seventies (1972) and Beyond the Canvas: Artists of the Seventies and Eighties (1985).Leo Castelli staged four solo shows dedicated to the artist between 1972 and 1996, and his oeuvre was the subject of a solo exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Art in 1978. His work was also included in the Forty-Fifth Venice Biennale (1993) and can be found in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the J. Paul Getty Museum. The Nevada Museum of Art opened  “Gianfranco Gorgoni Land Art Photographs,” an exhibition of his landscape images, in October.
https://www.artforum.com/news/gianfranco-gorgoni-1941-2019-80797

The New Avant-Garde: Issues for the Art of the Seventies

AT GAGOSIAN BOOKSHOP, “NEW AVANT-GARDE, ISSUES FOR THE ART OF THE SEVENTIES”, RESPONDS TO YOUR CURIOSITY ABOUT THIS WILDLY CREATIVE PERIOD OF AMERICAN ART.

THE NEW AVANT-GARDE, ISSUES FOR THE ART OF THE SEVENTIES

Text by Gregorie Muller New York: Praeger, 1972.

New York: The New Art Scene

Documenting the art world of  the 1970s, Gianfranco Gorgoni’s exceptional photographs portray the raw energy that was present during this transformative time in American sculpture. Most notable are the images of Richard Serra throwing molten lead in Leo Castelli’s warehouse.

FOLLOW THE NEXT LRFA BLOG FOR MORE OF DOUG’S RECOMMENDATIONS!

SEASON’S GREETINGS!

Outstanding highlights from Sikkema Jenkins with gallery partner Meg Malloy

Sheila Hicks

LAUNCHING SOLO SHOWS AND GROUP EXHIBITIONS EVERY MONTH THROUGHOUT THE YEAR CREATES A PHENOMENAL WORKLOAD FOR A GALLERY BUT THIS IS JUST THE PROVERBIAL TIP OF THE ICEBERG OF THE EFFORT IT TAKES TO SUPPORT ARTISTS, PLACE THEIR WORK IN COLLECTIONS, BOTH PRIVATE AND PUBLIC, GAIN INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION FOR THEIR WORK AND ORGANIZE EXHIBITIONS IN OTHER GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS. SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO. EXEMPLIFIES A GALLERY DEDICATED TO A LONG-TERM COMMITMENT TO THEIR ARTISTS, CONTINUALLY ADDING NEW TALENT TO A ROSTER OF ESTABLISHED ARTISTS, AND GIVING THEM A PERMANENT COLLABORATION BETWEEN GALLERY AND ARTIST TO PROVIDE BOTH COMMERCIAL AND CRITICAL SUCCESS.

THE LRFA BLOG IS VERY PLEASED TO WELCOME  BACK MEG MALLOY, PARTNER AT SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO., TO SHARE A VERY FEW OF THE MANY HIGHLIGHTS OF GALLERY NEWS AND TO SPEAK ABOUT THE GALLERY’S HOPES AND PLANS FOR THE FUTURE.

https://www.sikkemajenkinsco.com

Arturo Herrera

MEG, WELCOME BACK. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE EXHIBITIONS THAT YOU HAVE HAD IN THE LAST FIVE YEARS AT THE GALLERY THAT ARE PARTICULARLY MEMORABLE?

Kara’s last show was so exciting. We placed all of the works in the main space with major museums, and all of them have been on view at those institutions since those acquisitions.  I was just up at the Harvard Museums where I saw how many classes were held in front of Kara’s piece,  and it was great to see the work MoMA bought front and center in the rehang of the collection!   Mitch Epstein’s show addressing our uses and abuses of the land was very powerful, and will be shown at the Amon Carter next year.  Vik’s current show Museum of Ashes is striking a chord with visitors. It focuses on the tragic fire at  the National Museum in Rio and the loss of its irreplaceable artifacts, by recreating them out of the actual ashes.  

Louis Fratino

Louis Fratino’s show was so fresh and tender, and Jennifer’s work for her most recent show was just so powerful. It’s hard to convey how much pleasure I get  out of each of our artists’ shows.  Walking through the space and looking for four to five weeks, you really connect and see more, or learn to understand something different over time. It  Is such a gift.

MANY OF YOUR ARTISTS ARE HONORED WITH MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS AND SHOWS AT OTHER PRESTIGIOUS GALLERIES HERE AND ABROAD. HOW DO YOU ARRANGE FOR THESE AND HOW DO YOU PUBLICIZE THEM TO THE ARTIST AND GALLERY’S BEST ADVANTAGE?

We send out email blasts and use Instagram to announce exhibitions and awards.  We have also started making e-books for our shows with installation shots  to better share with a non local audience what the gallery and our artists are up to!

Josephine Halvorson

RECENT AWARDS AND MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS: 

Jeff Gibson wins the  MacArthur Foundation Fellowship

Kara Walker’s commission at Turbine Hall at the Tate Modern

Vik Muniz opening the new museum in Sarasota

Josephine Halvorson wins the James and Audrey Foster prize at the ICA, Boston

Jennifer Packer at MoCA this spring and the Serpentine this fall

Erin Shirreff at SF MoMA  now through November

Deana Lawson with survey forthcoming at Ica Boston at PS 1

Arturo Herrara’s  new work at Corbett vs Dempsey forthcoming

Marlene McCarty exhibit at the UB Art Galleries in Buffalo

Sheila  Hicks in MoMA’s Surrounds, the installation section on the 6th floor

Erin Shirreff

HOW HAVE YOU SEEN THE GALLERY SYSTEM CHANGE AND ADAPT TO GLOBALIZATION IN GENERAL AND HOW HAS SIKKEMA JENKINS APPROACHED THESE CHANGES IN PARTICULAR?

There is a wider worldwide audience.  There is also a lack of interaction as people use places like Artsy for inquiries.  I don’t like that!  I think we need a sense of who a buyer is. 

WE ARE IN THE THROES OF THE PRESENCE OF UBER-GALLERIES BOTH IN THE BRICKS AND MORTAR WORLD AND AT THE ART FAIRS. HOW DO SUBSTANTIAL, LONG-TERM BUT MORE MODEST GALLERIES DEAL WITH THIS COMPETITION?

We cannot compete with the uber galleries. But we can keep doing what we do best. Show great artists, work as hard as we can for them, place the work in the best collections we can, and remain approachable!

Mitch Epstein

WHAT EXHIBITIONS ARE YOU PLANNING FOR THE SEASON AHEAD?

We are currently showing Zipora Fried, a wonderful artist who was with the great  Stellar Rays until they closed. It is our first solo show with her and we are thrilled.  In the back galleries we are showing new  Cameron Martin paintings paired with vintage Kepes photographs.   Cameron’s show at James a Fuentes last year was a stunner, and we are delighted to show these new pieces.  In January, we will show new work by William Cordova and Josephine Halvorson’s Foster Prize show.  Then we will show Kara Walker, including some pieces that will go to Kunstmuseum  Basel for her forthcoming show there. In  May we will show  Merlin James, a still undervalued painter who’s got a terrific artists following.

We have to get Arturo Herrera and Kay Rosen on the books, both such strong wonderful artists

Kay Rosen

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE PLANS FOR THE GALLERY IN THE FUTURE?

To keep going!  To support our artists as best we can and to keep the non-uber gallery alive!

MEG, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR WONDERFUL CONTRIBUTION TO THE LRFA BLOG AND TO SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO.  GALLERY. IT IS NO WONDER THAT THE GALLERY HAS SUCH A LOYAL AND DEDICATED TEAM AND CONTINUES TO GROW AND THRIVE.

TIS THE SEASON, AND IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOGS, WE ARE DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE THE LRFA BLOG ANNUAL TRADITION:  POSTS FROM DOUG FLAMM, GAGOSIAN’S RARE BOOK EXPERT, WITH THIS YEAR’S IRRESISTIBLE GIFTS.

 

Art, artists and art fairs with gallery partner, Meg Malloy, of Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

Jeffrey Gibson
My Eyes Have Seen You
Sikkima Jenkins Booth H8 Art Basel Miami 2019

Art Fairs, A Global Phenomenon

The Rise of the Art Gathering
By Peter Letzelter-Smith

At the most utilitarian level, art fairs are simply trade shows. The trade is art. And like trade shows in any industry, they’re gatherings that bring sellers and potential buyers together in one place to converse, negotiate, and do deals. On a more inspirational level, art fairs are opportunities to feel the excitement of sharing time and space with other lovers of art. To see and to be seen. To get introduced to new galleries and new artists and to be stimulated. They are, at their best, broad avenues of inspiration for you to stroll down.

Today art fairs play a critical role in the world of contemporary art, accounting for millions of dollars of revenue for galleries and a must-do part of the calendar for a wide variety of collectors, curators, agents, and artists.

https://www.artland.com

AS YOU ARE READING THIS, ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 2019 IS OPENING  ITS DOORS TO THE PUBLIC AT THE MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER. YESTERDAY’S VIP OPENING INDICATED A HEALTHY AND BRISK GLOBAL ART MARKET IN WHICH 269 GALLERIES OFFER BOTH PRIMARY AND SECONDARY MARKET WORKS. PRIVATE COLLECTIONS OPEN THEIR DOORS TO THE PUBLIC, ART IN PUBLIC PLACES HAS LAUNCHED A PROJECT FEATURING SEVEN NEW MONUMENTAL OUTDOOR SCULPTURES, AND THE MIAMI MUSEUMS  HAVE CURATED EXHIBITIONS  OF ARTISTS WHOSE WORK IS TIMELY AND SOCIALLY AND POLITICALLY RELEVANT.

IN TODAY’S LRFA BLOG POST, WE ARE DELIGHTED TO VISIT WITH MEG MALLOY, PARTNER AT SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO. TO GAIN HER PERSPECTIVE ON THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ART FAIR IN TODAY’S GLOBAL CONTEMPORARY MARKET.

SIKKEMA JENKINS ART BASEL MIAMI SHOW CATALOG:

https://www.artbasel.com/catalog/gallery/1271/Sikkema-Jenkins-Co

MEG, THANK YOU AND WELCOME BACK!

Sheila Hicks
Fete du Lundi
Art Basel Miami 2019

WHAT ART FAIRS DO YOU PARTICIPATE IN, AND WITH SO MANY ART FAIRS PROLIFERATING EVERY MONTH, HOW HAVE YOU NARROWED THE FIELD TO THESE CHOICES?

There are three fairs we feel are core to our business: Basel, Miami Basel and Frieze New York.   This year we added Frieze London because of Kara’s Tate Turbine Project, Fons Americanus.  And we also plan to do ADAA with a solo booth of Jeffrey Gibson’s work.    We have done fairs all over, including Hong Kong, Bogota, Rio, Expo in Chicago and the Armory.  But we don’t have a large staff, and we find that clients from all over visit the gallery.  New York still is such an important art world center,  and in the gallery we  can give more of a sense of the breadth of what an artist does.  So it is all about keeping a balance.

Jeffrey Gibson
In Numbers Too Big To Ignore 2016

DO YOU FIND THAT DIFFERENT FAIR VENUES DEMAND DIFFERENT TYPES OF BOOTH IN TERMS OF WHAT CATEGORY OF ARTISTS YOU SELECT OR DO YOU MAKE A MIX OF EMERGING AND ESTABLISHED ARTISTS AT EACH FAIR?

In both Basel and Miami we do overview booths that give a real sense of the program.  But you also have to think strategically about what needs exposure because of a forthcoming museum show or a particular project.

Kara Walker Installation

YOU HAVE REPRESENTATED A VERY STRONG SELECTION OF BLACK ARTISTS SUCH AS KARA WALKER  PRIOR TO THE CURRENT WAVE OF POPULISM TO MAKE UP FOR THE OVERSIGHT. HOW DID YOU GRAVITATE TO HER WORK, FOR EXAMPLE?

I was not at the gallery when Kara joined, but it was clear to me from the moment I saw her NY debut at the Drawing Center show that hers was an original and powerful voice.  The fact that she had such wicked skill and was able to combine humor and and  elegance with a head-on engagement with the horror of our  history and the legacy of mistreatment of people of color was just so much to take in.  Her greatness was undeniable.  Brent responded to the work right away and then met Kara at her studio in Providence and they just connected.   And then Michael had actually studied with Kara’s dad in Atlanta.

Merlin James
HyperFocal: 0

YOU HAVE ALSO HAD THE INSIGHT TO SELECT NEW CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS SUCH AS JENNIFER PACKER WHEN THEY ARE AT THE EDGE OF LEAPING TO ANOTHER LEVEL OF ARTISTIC RECOGNITION.  HOW WERE YOU INTRODUCED TO HER WORK?

Michael and I each saw Jennifer’s work at her Studio Museum residency show and we were both so struck by it.   She was clearly such a talented painter.  She makes figurative painting feel so fresh, but she also has such a clear sense of history!   Michael visited her first and then I came to the second visit.  Sometimes you just know.

Jennifer Packer
April
Oil on canvas

YOU HAVE AN IMPRESSIVE TRACK RECORD FOR PICKING ARTISTS AT AN EARLY STAGE IN THEIR CAREERS, AND BUILDING AN EXTENSIVE MARKET IN BOTH THE PRIVATE SECTOR AND MUSEUM AND INSTITUTIONAL VENUES.  HOW DO YOU GO ABOUT APPROACHING COLLECTORS TO INTEREST THEM IN SOMEONE NEW OR TO GAIN APPROVAL FROM A MUSEUM BOARD TO ACQUIRE AN EMERGING CONTEMPORARY ARTIST WITH A GREAT CAREER AHEAD.

Thank you!  We strive to get work we think curators should see in front of them without barraging them.   Sometimes it takes years.  And we’re lucky to  have some really loyal collectors and consultants who know our track record, and have faith in what we do, and they keep visits to us at the gallery in regular rotation.  We are also privileged to have an upstairs viewing area where  we can expose visitors to artists not on view downstairs.

Deana Lawson
Soweto Queen
Pigment Print

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG POST, WE LOOK FORWARD TO LEARNING ABOUT SOME OF THE OUTSTANDING EXHIBITIONS AT THE GALLERY, PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE. THANK YOU, MEG!

Holding one’s breath while allowing artists complete creative license with Meg Malloy, partner, Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

Zipora Fried As the Ground Turns Solid Current exhibit Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

 

BOASTING A DIVERSE ROSTER OF NOTEWORTHY ARTISTS WORKING TODAY, SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO. IS AN ESTABLISHED MIDSIZE GALLERY SPACE LOCATED IN WEST CHELSEA. REPRESENTED ARE SUCH BIG-NAME VETERANS AS VIK MUNIZ AND KARA WALKER, AS WELL AS MID-CAREER POWERHOUSES SHEILA HICKS AND DEANA LAWSON. THE WORK REPRESENTS ARTISTS WHO WORK IN EVERY MEDIUM: PAINTING, PHOTOGRAPHY, SCULPTURE, VIDEO, INSTALLATION; AND IN EVERY GENRE: ABSTRACTION, NARRATION, FIGURATION, MANY ADDRESSING SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ISSUES, OTHERS ADDRESSING THE LEGACY OF ART HISTORY AND EVOLVING IT FORWARD.  THE UNIFYING FACTOR IS THE QUALITY, ENGAGEMENT AND IMPACT OF THE WORK, TO THE VIEWER, TO THE COLLECTOR AND TO THE MUSEUM CURATOR.

IN 2019 ALONE, SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO.  EXHIBITED THE WORK OF THE FOLLOWING ARTISTS, AN ABBREVIATED EXAMPLE OF THE BREADTH AND SCOPE OF THE ARTISTS THE GALLERY SUPPORTS AND ENCOURAGES.

Brenda Goodman

BRENDA GOODMAN

With over 50 years of experience as a painter, Goodman is an artist at the height of her career. She began in 1960s Detroit, as a member of the famed Cass Corridor Movement. In the early 1970s, she exhibited with Guston, Tworkov and de Kooning at the Gertrude Kasle Gallery. After moving to New York City in 1976, Goodman explored ways to integrate intensely personal issues with the freedom of abstract expressionism.

Louis Fratino

LOUIS FRATINO

Drawing inspiration from personal experience and, more recently, photographic source material, Fratino makes paintings and drawings of the male body. His work includes portraits, nudes, and intimate scenes of male couples engaged in activities ranging from the mundane to the graphically sexual. The result is a body of work that is a loving and honest expression of the contemporary gay experience.

Jennifer Packer

JENNIFER PACKER

Packer’s painted figures and still lifes are exceptional for their expressive fields of color, worked tenderly by the artist’s hand. They are images made with the utmost care–for the subject, and for the artist herself. Packer’s subjects are often friends and family, loved ones who serve as an emotive force in her life. Her representations critique the positionality, autonomy and power of the marginalized subject.

Terry Haggerty

TERRY HAGGERTY

Terry Haggerty’s paintings reveal the multi-dimensional possibilities within painting – bold color is used to enliven and give volume and depth to positive and negative space. A series of monochrome lines, corners, and edges fold around one another, activating gaps between geometric planes of color. Haggerty’s works embrace the tension between two-dimensional outline and three-dimensional form, creating images characterized as “half object, half painting.”

AND CURRENTLY, THE BEAUTIFUL RECENT ABSTRACTIONS BY

Zipora Fried

ZIPORA FRIED

Working across sculpture, photography, and drawing, Fried’s oeuvre explores the potential of color and form to transcend language and express the nuances of the human experience. The subconscious remains a focal point of interest for Fried, as the formal conditions of object and image become deconstructed and reinterpreted through their symbolic connections to one another. Every gesture of the artist’s hand, in shape and form, signifies a distinct moment in the phenomenological experience of Fried’s work.

MEG, WHAT ARTISTS DOES THE GALLERY REPRESENT, AND HOW WOULD YOU CHARACTERIZE THE WORK?

The artists that  we represent are quite varied, and it is hard to pinpoint, but I feel that all  start from social or conceptual concerns, and all have great skill and create work that is consistently engaging on both a visual and an intellectual level.

IS THERE A PARTICULARLY AESTHETIC, OR CONCEPTUAL OR ABSTRACT POINT OF VIEW THAT CONNECTS EACH ARTIST’S WORKS?

I would say it is open-ended, but each of our artists has an integrity and an unshakable commitment to what they do. 

WHAT DID YOU MOVE TO CHELSEA, AND WHAT PROMPTED THAT DECISION?

The gallery moved to Chelsea because there were great spaces, and Soho rents were through the roof.

WAS THE CURRENT 22nd STREET LOCATION THE FIRST SPACE THAT YOU TOOK, AND HOW HAS IT EXPANDED OVER THE YEARS?

We are at the same address, but the gallery has been in the unusual position of  being able to expand in place as the business grew.   We had half of our downstairs originally and then were offered the other half.   This was due to unfortunate circumstances as both Pat Hearn and Colin de Land who had that space passed away.  Then we rented the back of upstairs from Anina Nosei for storage and viewings, and then when she didn’t renew we took over  that space. 

Sheila Hicks

 

THE GALLERY ROSTER IS A STRONG MIX OF ESTABLISHED ARTISTS SUCH AS ARTURO HERRERA, SHEILA HICKS, KARA WALKER, AND EMERGING TALENTS. WHO ARE SOME OF THE ARTISTS AND WHAT ARE SOME OF THE EXHIBITIONS THAT HAVE RESONATED WITH YOU THE MOST?

That is an impossible question!  😊

YOU SHOW ARTISTS IN A WIDE VARIETY OF MEDIA. WHO ARE SOME OF THE ARTISTS THAT YOU REPRESENT THAT ARE THE MOST CHALLENGING IN TERMS OF THE EXHIBITION OF THEIR WORK? YOU ARE SO GENEROUS WITH THE GALLERY SPACE, ALLOWING THE ARTISTS LICENSE TO TREAT THE SPACE AS PART OF THE CREATIVE PROCESS.

You have to have faith in an artist’s  vision.   That said, there are times when we hold our breath. For Kara’s last show, there were three very large-scale unframed works on paper.  The audience for that show was enormous and we worried that the work could be damaged but people were so respectful.  William Córdova created a scaffolding that pushed viewers to the perimeter of the gallery. 

William Cordova
Machu Picchu

MORE ABOUT THE GALLERY, ART FAIRS, CURRENT AND FUTURE EXHIBITIONS WITH MEG MALLOY IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG.

IN THE MEANTIME, EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY, AND HAVE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!

Andy Warhol
Turkey Noodle Soup

An evolution from the world of art publishing to partner with Sikkema Jenkins & Co.’s Meg Malloy

Kara Walker
The High Note, The Low Note, The psychotic and The Judge

 

KNOWN FOR  SUPPORTING THEIR ARTISTS AND ARTIST PROJECTS  IN ALL OF THEIR ARTISTIC ENDEAVORS, SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO. HAS A STRONG PUBLISHING ARM THAT PRODUCES EDITIONS OF WORKS BY THE GALLERY ARTISTS. THEIR SEPTEMBER EXHIBITION WAS  A REFLECTION OF THAT DEDICATION.

EDITIONS: JEFFREY GIBSON, KAY ROSEN, ERIN SHIRREFF, KARA WALKER
SEPTEMBER 3 – OCTOBER 5, 2019

Sikkema Jenkins & Co. is pleased to present a selection of editions by gallery artists Jeffrey Gibson, Erin Shirreff, Kara Walker, and Kay Rosen

Jeffrey Gibson’s new series of multimedia prints, feature vivid, screen-printed letters collaged onto a digitally printed background. Adapting lyrics from popular dance songs of the eighties and nineties, Gibson prints highlight the centrality of joy and celebration as a form of strength and resistance for marginalized communities. 

Jeffrey Gibson
The Future is Present
Edition of 30, Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

Kay Rosen’s edition, The Man, is centered around the idea of formal and textual transformation. Spanning the wall in a series of vinyl letters, The Man composes a narrative based on repeated phrases and wordplay. The body of “The Man” is deconstructed across each line of text, as a series of interconnected linguistic relationships rather than a cohesive singular identity. Rosen’s work utilizes the force of language, or a singular word, to recontextualize language as a visual experience. 

Erin Shirreff’s Four Heads diptych appropriates Jean Arp painted wood sculpture Two Heads (1929). Using the printing methods of photogravure and Chine-collé, Four Heads reconfigures the three-dimensional forms and edges of Arp’s sculpture on a two-dimensional plane. By reinterpreting traditional representations of image, form, and dimensionality, Shirreff’s work asks viewer’s how to negotiate the difference between object and photographic representation. 

The High Note, The Low Note, The Psychotic and The Judge (2018) by Kara Walker is a painted-laser cut stainless steel sculpture produced as a limited edition for the Camden Arts Centre in London. The High Note features four grotesque faces bisecting one another on two opposing steel sheets. Walker’s work reveals the multiple identities implicated by the horrors of slavery and white supremacy.

Jeffrey Gibson
Installation View, September 2019 exhibition
Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

A PARTNER AT THE GALLERY AS OF 2003, MEG MALLOY’S FIRST INTRODUCTION AS A PROFESSIONAL IN THE NEW YORK ART WORLD WAS IN PRINT PUBLISHING, WORKING AT THE HIGHLY-RESPECTED CROWN POINT PRESS IN THEIR NEW YORK GALLERY. THIS AFFORDED HER AN INTRODUCTION TO MANY CELEBRATED INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS  SUCH AS JOAN JONAS, RICHARD DIEBENKORN AND WAYNE THIEBAUD, AND TO THE HIGHEST STANDARDS OF PRINT PUBLISHING IN DEPTH FIRST AT CROWN POINT AND SUBSEQUENTLY AT THE LEGENDARY EDITION SCHELLMANN.

Erin Shirreff
Four Heads
Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

WITH AN EXTENSIVE BACKGROUND AT DISTINGUISHED PRESSES, MEG MALLOY, PARTNER AT SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO., WAS INVITED TO JOIN THE GALLERY INITIALLY TO EXPAND THEIR ART PUBLISHING DIVISION.

MEG, THANK YOU FOR CONTRIBUTING TO THE LRFA BLOG.

TO CONTINUE,  WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST JOB IN THE ART WORLD?

Through Connie, I got a job at Crown Point Press, the San Francisco-based publisher. The amazing Kathan Brown had brought an etching press over from England by boat in the 60s, and revived fine art etching in the U.S.  Kathan was quite adventurous and worked with unexpected artists like Joan Jonas and John Cage, as well as more traditional painters like Diebenkorn and Thiebaud.  She brought Connie on to include more international artists and Connie had them interview me for a job.  Rather than hiring me for San Francisco, they hired the wonderful and much more experienced Valerie Wade – Kathan’s business partner to this day!  

They  hired me for the New York gallery where I would work for Karen McCready, a legendary print dealer, who had come to Crown Point Press from Pace.  It was a terrific  place to work and I learned so much.  After working at CPP, I went to Edition Schellmann, a German based publisher of prints, multiples and catalog raisonnes.   I stayed there twelve years!   While at Schellmann, we did a project with Kara Walker, whose work I so admired, and through that project, I got to know Michael Jenkins and Brent Sikkema. They originally brought me in to work on their  publishing program.  We still do editions as part of our program, the most recent the bronze maquette of Kara’s Tate project.

Kay Rosen
The Man
Editions September-October 2019
Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

WHAT IS THE HISTORY OF THE GALLERY? AT WHAT POINT DID YOU COME ON BOARD?

Brent had been a photo dealer in Boston but had moved to NYC in 1991 to open a contemporary gallery in Soho.   It was always a gallery I loved.  Michael was an artist whose work I admired, and he had also curated shows for Brent. He joined the gallery in 1996.  I joined in the beginning of 2002.  Brent had taken Kara on at the beginning of her career,  shortly after her Drawing Center show, and Vik Muniz also came onboard early.  We feel so fortunate that both of these wonderful artists are still with the gallery.  In terms of gallery name, the gallery changed its name to Sikkema Jenkins and Co. in 2003.  Though I started out overseeing the publishing projects, I quickly got caught up in all the exciting things going on at the gallery and my role expanded.  I became a partner in 2003.

Erin Shirreff, Kara Walker, Kay Rosen
Installation view
Editions, exhibited September 2019
Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

WHAT WAS THE CLIMATE OF THE ART WORLD WHEN YOU JOINED? WHAT WERE THE BEST APPROACHES TO PLACING WORKS IN COLLECTIONS?

The art world was much smaller!   The print world was especially so, and also very collegial.  The AIDS crisis was at its height in the U.S. and the art world’s connection to politics and protest was much closer; there was more urgency.  Everyone participated in protests.

In terms of collections,  then as now, you would strive to get museum attention for artists, and to place works with collectors who feel some sense of responsibility or connection to the work.   Someone who will lend to an exhibition.  Someone who will care for the work.  These things are constants.

IN OUR NEXT LRFA BLOG, MEG WILL INFORM US OF THE FOCUS OF THE GALLERY AND SOME HIGHLIGHTS OF ITS DISTINGUISHED HISTORY.

PLEASE JOIN US!